• Title, Summary, Keyword: Hospice nurse specialist

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The perception of Hospice Health Professionals on the Hospice Clinical Nurse Specialist System (호스피스 전문간호사 제도에 관한 인식)

  • Oh, Pok-Ja;Lee, Hee-Jung;Kim, Bog-Ja
    • Asian Oncology Nursing
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    • v.3 no.1
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    • pp.15-23
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    • 2003
  • Purpose: This study was to find out hospice nurses and other health professionals' perception on the system of hospice and palliative nurse specialist. Methods: Using questionnaire, 63 nurses and 22 other health professionals answered about the benefit required qualification, workforce standard, and the extent of autonomy needed for hospice and palliative nurse specialist. Data was collected from August, 2002 to November, 2002. and analyzed by using SPSS 10 program. Results: 1) 96.4% of the subjects perceived that hospice nurse specialist will improve the quality of care and patient satisfaction. 2) The most frequent response for the type of education required for hospice nurse specialist was one year post RN program. 3) The most frequent response for the required clinical experience of hospice nurse specialists was minimum of four to five years. 4) The most important qualification for the hospice nurse specialists was an "good relationship with others", and "clinical experience". 5) One to two hospice nurse specialist per hospice facility was viewed as a sufficient number. 6. Autonomy was viewed as the most important characteristic which should be granted to hospice nurse specialist. Conclusion: The results of this study can be used as a basic information in establishing hospice nurse specialist program.

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Evaluation of Participation & Management on the Cyber Hospice Specialist Program (사이버 호스피스 전문 간호 교육 과정에서의 학습참여와 운영평가)

  • Kim, Boon-Han;Choi, Ji-Eun
    • Korean Journal of Adult Nursing
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    • v.15 no.1
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    • pp.105-115
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    • 2003
  • Purpose: The research purposes analyzed the study participation and lecture evaluation of applicants in the cyber hospice specialist education course to find problems of nurse education application on the web. Method: Study participants were 125 nurses for participation and 68nurses for lecture evaluation. The data was analysed by descriptive statistics. Result: The results obtained from this study were as follows 1) The residence distribution of study participants was spread out across the nation. Equal distribution of education was accomplished without a difference among provinces. 2) The average study duration in the study participation was about one hour and a quarter minutes a week, and number of access to lecture notes was 65.8 times. But in a discussion room and a cooperative room, the system using rate was very low, so we considered the idea to come up with a more effective application way. 3) The participant's lecture evaluation of cyber education were generally satisfied about the quality of lecture, time, contents etc. Conclusion: This study shows the possible implication for nursing fields using a web-based learning program for reeducation in a variety of fields, so nursing cyber application can be considered to come up with this more effective method.

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소아암 환아의 영적 케어

  • Sin, Min-Seon
    • Korean Journal of Hospice Care
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    • v.5 no.2
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    • pp.54-63
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    • 2005
  • The purpose of this study is to examine the requirement for child life support specialist and fetal education for children with cancer. This research presented was composed with three chapters : First chapter, I presented the purpose, scope and definitions of this research. Second chapter, I defined about hospice care service for children with cancer and kind of pediatric cancer. And general characteristics of children with cancer, a understanding character of death and dietary therapy. Lastly, I defined and investigated about spiritual care. Third chapter, I concluded with some of findings and final suggestions based on the results. According to the developmental stages children with cancer are disability of communication competence and more dependence on their parents, therefore parents' decision making were more difficulty. And parents with a child who suffers from a cancer needs a counseling in order to discover the meaning of life. Parents' psychological experience about the caring for their child suffering from pediatric cancer was equal to broken hearts due to shadow of the child's death from time to time. In other words a parents with a child who suffers from a cancer needs comprehensive services such as hospice, consultor as well as wide experienced pediatrician and nurse. Child life support specialist can help them recover and improve their o주 potential strength in behalf of overcoming their difficulties. And pastoral counseling can help them reduce the fear and anxiety about unknown world and death. The systematically developed a school-based counseling program would help children adjust to the difficulties after a perfect cure because of children adjusted to school well when they have good peer relationships.

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호스피스 전달체계 모형

  • Choe, Hwa-Suk
    • Korean Journal of Hospice Care
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    • v.1 no.1
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    • pp.46-69
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    • 2001
  • Hospice Care is the best way to care for terminally ill patients and their family members. However most of them can not receive the appropriate hospice service because the Korean health delivery system is mainly be focussed on acutly ill patients. This study was carried out to clarify the situation of hospice in Korea and to develop a hospice care delivery system model which is appropriate in the Korean context. The theoretical framework of this study that hospice care delivery system is composed of hospice resources with personnel, facilities, etc., government and non-government hospice organization, hospice finances, hospice management and hospice delivery, was taken from the Health Delivery System of WHO(1984). Data was obtained through data analysis of litreature, interview, questionairs, visiting and Delphi Technique, from October 1998 to April 1999 involving 56 hospices, 1 hospice research center, 3 non-government hospice organizations, 20 experts who have had hospice experience for more than 3 years(mean is 9 years and 5 months) and officials or members of 3 non-government hospice organizations. There are 61 hospices in Korea. Even though hospice personnel have tried to study and to provide qualified hospice serices, there is nor any formal hospice linkage or network in Korea. This is the result of this survey made to clarify the situation of Korean hospice. Results of the study by Delphi Technique were as follows: 1.Hospice Resources: Key hospice personnel were found to be hospice coordinator, doctor, nurse, clergy, social worker, volunteers. Necessary qualifications for all personnel was that they conditions were resulted as have good health, receive hospice education and have communication skills. Education for hospice personnel is divided into (i)basic training and (ii)special education, e.g. palliative medicine course for hospice specialist or palliative care course in master degree for hospice nurse specialist. Hospice facilities could be developed by adding a living room, a space for family members, a prayer room, a church, an interview room, a kitchen, a dining room, a bath facility, a hall for music, art or work therapy, volunteers' room, garden, etc. to hospital facilities. 2.Hospice Organization: Whilst there are three non-government hospice organizations active at present, in the near future an hospice officer in the Health&Welfare Ministry plus a government Hospice body are necessary. However a non-government council to further integrate hospice development is also strongly recommended. 3.Hospice Finances: A New insurance standards, I.e. the charge for hospice care services, public information and tax reduction for donations were found suggested as methods to rise the hospice budget. 4.Hospice Management: Two divisions of hospice management/care were considered to be necessary in future. The role of the hospice officer in the Health & Welfare Ministry would be quality control of hospice teams and facilities involved/associated with hospice insurance standards. New non-government integrating councils role supporting the development of hospice care, not insurance covered. 5.Hospice delivery: Linkage&networking between hospice facilities and first, second, third level medical institutions are needed in order to provide varied and continous hospice care. Hospice Acts need to be established within the limits of medical law with regards to standards for professional staff members, educational programs, etc. The results of this study could be utilizes towards the development to two hospice care delivery system models, A and B. Model A is based on the hospital, especially the hospice unit, because in this setting is more easily available the new medical insurance for hospice care. Therefore a hospice team is organized in the hospital and may operate in the hospice unit and in the home hospice care service. After Model A is set up and operating, Model B will be the next stage, in which medical insurance cover will be extended to home hospice care service. This model(B) is also based on the hospital, but the focus of the hospital hospice unit will be moved to home hospice care which is connected by local physicians, national public health centers, community parties as like churches or volunteer groups. Model B will contribute to the care of terminally ill patients and their family members and also assist hospital administrators in cost-effectiveness.

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Validation of a Palliative Prognostic Index to Predict Life Expectancy for Terminally Ill Cancer Patients in a Hospice Consultation Setting in Taiwan

  • Cheng, Wei-Hong;Kao, Chen-Yi;Hung, Yu-Shin;Su, Po-Jung;Hsieh, Chia-Hsun;Chen, Jen-Shi;Wang, Hung-Ming;Chou, Wen-Chi
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.6
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    • pp.2861-2866
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    • 2012
  • Background: The aim of our study was to assess the practical utility of the palliative prognostic index (PPI) as a prognostic tool used by nurse specialists in a hospice consultation setting in Taiwan. Methods: In total, 623 terminal cancer patients under hospice consultation care from one medical center in northern Taiwan were enrolled between January 1 and June 30, 2011. PPI was assessed by a nurse specialist at first hospice consultation and patients categorized into groups by prognosis (good, intermediate, poor). Patient survival was analyzed retrospectively to determine significance of between-group differences. Results: By PPI sum score, 37.2% of patients were in the good prognosis group, 18% in the intermediate prognosis group and 44.8% in the poor prognosis group. The death rates were 56%, 81.2% and 89.6% and median survivals were 76, 18 and 7 days, respectively. The hazard ratio was 0.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.10-0.24, p<0.001) for the poor versus good prognosis group and 0.54 (95% CI 0.43-0.69, p<0.001) for the poor versus intermediate prognosis group. The sensitivity and specificity for the poor prognosis group was 66% and 71%; the positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 81% and 52%, respectively, to predict patient death within 21 days (area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic was 0.68). Conclusions: Assessment by PPI can accurately predict survival of terminal cancer patients receiving hospice consultation care. PPI is a simple tool and can be administered by nurse members of hospice consultation teams.

The Meaning of Good Dying of Chinese Terminally Ill Cancer Patients in Taiwan

  • Chao, Co-Shi Chantal
    • 한국호스피스완화의료학회:학술대회논문집
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    • pp.162-174
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    • 2000
  • The purpose of this hermeneutic study was to investigate the meaning of "good dying" of Chinese terminally ill cancer patients in Taiwan; the factors related to this morning; and the strategies cancer patients used to ensure "good dying". Indepth unstructured interviews, prolonged participant observations, and review of clinical records were selected as the methods for data collection. In the four and one-half month period of data collection, the researcher was in the role of a full time clinical nurse specialist who directly took care of the subject patients in 4 hospitals and in patients' homes. The 20 subject were selected purposively according to selection criteria and various demographic backgrounds. Interview transcripts and field notes comprised the data for analysis. The results were composed by 3 constitutive patterns and 12 themes. Achieving inner peace appeared to herald the good dying state. The "good dying" for Chinese terminally ill cancer patients in Taiwan meant peace of body, peace of mind, and peace of thought. The constitutive pattern of peace of body included 4 themes: (1)minimizing the agony of physical symptoms; (2)short period of dying process without lingering death; (3) cleanliness, neatness, and integrity of the body; and (4) mobility. The constitutive pattern of peace of mind included 5 themes: (1) yielding; (2) non-attachment; (3) not to be lonely; (4) settle down all affairs; and (5) being in a preferred environment and enjoying nature. The third constitutive pattern of peace of thought included 3 themes: (1) getting through day by day without thinking; (2) meaningful life; and (3) expectation that the suffering would be ending. Through understanding of the terminally ill cancer patient' needs in their meanings of "good dying", recommendations can be made for humanistic care. The findings of this study have recommendations for care givers daily contact with dying patients and for medical and nursing education.

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