• Title/Summary/Keyword: Animal Genetic Resources

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Assessment of Genetic Diversity, Relationships and Structure among Korean Native Cattle Breeds Using Microsatellite Markers

  • Suh, Sangwon;Kim, Young-Sin;Cho, Chang-Yeon;Byun, Mi-Jeong;Choi, Seong-Bok;Ko, Yeoung-Gyu;Lee, Chang Woo;Jung, Kyoung-Sub;Bae, Kyoung Hun;Kim, Jae-Hwan
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.27 no.11
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    • pp.1548-1553
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    • 2014
  • Four Korean native cattle (KNC) breeds-Hanwoo, Chikso, Heugu, and Jeju black-are entered in the Domestic Animal Diversity Information System of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). The objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationships and population structure of these KNC breeds (n = 120) and exotic breeds (Holstein and Charolais, n = 56). Thirty microsatellite loci recommended by the International Society for Animal Genetics/FAO were genotyped. These genotypes were used to determine the allele frequencies, allelic richness, heterozygosity and polymorphism information content per locus and breed. Genetic diversity was lower in Heugu and Jeju black breeds. Phylogenetic analysis, Factorial Correspondence Analysis and genetic clustering grouped each breed in its own cluster, which supported the genetic uniqueness of the KNC breeds. These results will be useful for conservation and management of KNC breeds as animal genetic resources.

Population Structure and Genetic Bottleneck Analysis of Ankleshwar Poultry Breed by Microsatellite Markers

  • Pandey, A.K.;Kumar, Dinesh;Sharma, Rekha;Sharma, Uma;Vijh, R.K.;Ahlawat, S.P.S.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.18 no.7
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    • pp.915-921
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    • 2005
  • Genetic variation at 25 microsatellite loci, population structure, and genetic bottleneck hypothesis were examined for Ankleshwar poultry population found in Gujrat, India. The estimates of genetic variability such as effective number of alleles and gene diversities revealed substantial genetic variation frequently displayed by microsatellite markers. The average polymorphism across the studied loci and the expected gene diversity in the population were 6.44 and 0.670${\pm}$0.144, respectively. The population was observed to be significantly differentiated into different groups, and showed fairly high level of inbreeding (f = 0.240${\pm}$0.052) and global heterozygote deficit. The bottleneck analysis indicated the absence of genetic bottleneck in the past. The study revealed that the Ankleshwar poultry breed needs appropriate genetic management for its conservation and improvement. The information generated in this study may further be utilized for studying differentiation and relationships among different Indian poultry breeds.

Genetic Diversity and Relationships of Korean Chicken Breeds Based on 30 Microsatellite Markers

  • Suh, Sangwon;Sharma, Aditi;Lee, Seunghwan;Cho, Chang-Yeon;Kim, Jae-Hwan;Choi, Seong-Bok;Kim, Hyun;Seong, Hwan-Hoo;Yeon, Seong-Hum;Kim, Dong-Hun;Ko, Yeoung-Gyu
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.27 no.10
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    • pp.1399-1405
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    • 2014
  • The effective management of endangered animal genetic resources is one of the most important concerns of modern breeding. Evaluation of genetic diversity and relationship of local breeds is an important factor towards the identification of unique and valuable genetic resources. This study aimed to analyze the genetic diversity and population structure of six Korean native chicken breeds (n = 300), which were compared with three imported breeds in Korea (n = 150). For the analysis of genetic diversity, 30 microsatellite markers from FAO/ISAG recommended diversity panel or previously reported microsatellite markers were used. The number of alleles ranged from 2 to 15 per locus, with a mean of 8.13. The average observed heterozygosity within native breeds varied between 0.46 and 0.59. The overall heterozygote deficiency ($F_{IT}$) in native chicken was $0.234{\pm}0.025$. Over 30.7% of $F_{IT}$ was contributed by within-population deficiency ($F_{IS}$). Bayesian clustering analysis, using the STRUCTURE software suggested 9 clusters. This study may provide the background for future studies to identify the genetic uniqueness of the Korean native chicken breeds.

Evaluation of Genetic Variation and Phylogenetic Relationship among North Indian Cattle Breeds

  • Sharma, Rekha;Pandey, A.K.;Singh, Y.;Prakash, B.;Mishra, B.P.;Kathiravan, P.;Singh, P.K.;Singh, G.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.22 no.1
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    • pp.13-19
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    • 2009
  • In the present study, genetic analyses of diversity and differentiation were performed on four breeds of Indian zebu cattle (Bos indicus). In total, 181 animals belonging to Ponwar, Kherigarh, Gangatiri and Kenkatha breeds were genotyped for 20 cattle specific microsatellite markers. Mean number of alleles observed per locus (MNA) varied between 5.75 (Kenkatha) to 6.05 (Kherigarh). The observed and expected heterozygosity for the breeds varied from 0.48 (Gangatiri) to 0.58 (Kherigarh) and 0.65 (Kenkatha) to 0.70 (Kherigarh), respectively. $F_{IS}$ estimates of all the breeds indicated significant deficit of heterozygotes being 28.8%, 25.9%, 17.7% and 17.7% for Gangatiri, Ponwar, Kherigarh and Kenkatha, respectively. The $F_{ST}$ estimates demonstrated that 10.6% was the average genetic differentiation among the breeds. Nei's genetic distance DA and Cavalli- Sforza and Edwards Chord distance ($D_C$) and the phylogenetic tree constructed from these reflected the close genetic relationship of Gangatiri and Kenkatha, whereas Ponwar appears to be more distant.

Post-Thaw Cryosurvival of Bovine Embryos Produced In Vitro and In Vivo after Controlled Freezing

  • Cho, Sang-Rae;Choi, Sun-Ho;Choe, Chang-Yong;Lee, Poong-Yeon;Son, Jun-Kyu;Kim, Jae-Bum;Kim, Sung-Jae;Kim, Hyun-Jong;Shin, Seung-Oh;Son, Dong-Soo
    • Journal of Embryo Transfer
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    • v.24 no.4
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    • pp.253-257
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    • 2009
  • To enhance the embryo preservation technology and better application of embryo transfer technique to the field (dairy science or animal reproduction. etc.), we examined the viabilities of bovine embryos produced in vitro and in vivo after cryopreservation according to their developmental stage and thawing temperature. Bovine embryos from in vivo/vitro fertilization (Hanwoo) were examined at day 7, 8, and 9. Survival rates and total cell numbers of in vivo fertilized embryos were as follows: morulae 68.8% and $67\;{\pm}\;6.0$; blastocysts 80.5% and $120\;{\pm}\;10$; expanded blastocysts 77.4% and $138\;{\pm}\;9.7$, respectively. Rates of embryo development for blastocysts and expanded blastocysts after thawing were significantly higher than that of morula stage embryos (p<0.05). While survival rates of in vitro fertilized embryos according to developmental stage showed no significant difference among groups (morula 67.9%; blastocyst 74.3%; and expanded blastocyst 79.4%), total cell numbers were significantly lower than those of other groups (morula $64\;{\pm}\;5.9$; blastocyst $116\;{\pm}\;8.7$; and expanded blastocyst $135\;{\pm}\;9.1$) For the viability according to thawing temperature, survival rate was higher in $37^{\circ}C$.

Estimating genetic diversity and population structure of 22 chicken breeds in Asia using microsatellite markers

  • Roh, Hee-Jong;Kim, Seung-Chang;Cho, Chang-Yeon;Lee, Jinwook;Jeon, Dayeon;Kim, Dong-kyo;Kim, Kwan-Woo;Afrin, Fahmida;Ko, Yeoung-Gyu;Lee, Jun-Heon;Batsaikhan, Solongo;Susanti, Triana;Hegay, Sergey;Kongvongxay, Siton;Gorkhali, Neena Amatya;Thi, Lan Anh Nguyen;Thao, Trinh Thi Thu;Manikku, Lakmalie
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.33 no.12
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    • pp.1896-1904
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    • 2020
  • Objective: Estimating the genetic diversity and structures, both within and among chicken breeds, is critical for the identification and conservation of valuable genetic resources. In chickens, microsatellite (MS) marker polymorphisms have previously been widely used to evaluate these distinctions. Our objective was to analyze the genetic diversity and relationships among 22 chicken breeds in Asia based on allelic frequencies. Methods: We used 469 genomic DNA samples from 22 chicken breeds from eight Asian countries (South Korea, KNG, KNB, KNR, KNW, KNY, KNO; Laos, LYO, LCH, LBB, LOU; Indonesia, INK, INS, ING; Vietnam, VTN, VNH; Mongolia, MGN; Kyrgyzstan, KGPS; Nepal, NPS; Sri Lanka, SBC) and three imported breeds (RIR, Rhode Island Red; WLG, White Leghorn; CON, Cornish). Their genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships were analyzed using 20 MS markers. Results: In total, 193 alleles were observed across all 20 MS markers, and the number of alleles ranged from 3 (MCW0103) to 20 (LEI0192) with a mean of 9.7 overall. The NPS breed had the highest expected heterozygosity (Hexp, 0.718±0.027) and polymorphism information content (PIC, 0.663±0.030). Additionally, the observed heterozygosity (Hobs) was highest in LCH (0.690±0.039), whereas WLG showed the lowest Hexp (0.372±0.055), Hobs (0.384±0.019), and PIC (0.325±0.049). Nei's DA genetic distance was the closest between VTN and VNH (0.086), and farthest between KNG and MGN (0.503). Principal coordinate analysis showed similar results to the phylogenetic analysis, and three axes explained 56.2% of the variance (axis 1, 19.17%; 2, 18.92%; 3, 18.11%). STRUCTURE analysis revealed that the 22 chicken breeds should be divided into 20 clusters, based on the highest ΔK value (46.92). Conclusion: This study provides a basis for future genetic variation studies and the development of conservation strategies for 22 chicken breeds in Asia.