• Title, Summary, Keyword: Basic medical education

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Clinical Competency-Centered Learning Outcomes in Basic Medical Education (진료역량 중심의 기본의학교육 학습성과)

  • Lee, Kang Wook
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.18 no.3
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    • pp.145-149
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    • 2016
  • Outcome-based learning is a global trend in medical education. The Korean Association of Medical Colleges (KAMC) has been developing learning objectives for basic medical education (BME) in Korea. In 2012, KAMC published the 1st edition of "Learning outcomes of basic medical education: Clinical competency-centered" in order to promote outcome-based medical education. KAMC has recently revised and updated the learning outcomes of basic medical education in the clinical competency-centered 2nd edition to reflect the suggestions of all medical schools in Korea and improve application of the published learning outcomes for BME in the field of medical education. KAMC has been making efforts to integrate clinical competency-centered learning outcomes with scientific concepts and principle-centered learning outcomes in addition to basic clinical skills and performance in BME.

A Study of the Historical Development and Directions of Premedical Education (의예과 교육의 역사적 발전과 교육과정 편성 방향 고찰)

  • Jung, Hanna;Yang, Eunbae B.
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.19 no.3
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    • pp.115-120
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    • 2017
  • Despite the importance of how the premedical education curriculum is organized, the basic direction of the curriculum has not been evaluated at a fundamental level. In order to explore the basic directions of the premedical education curriculum, this study examined medical education as a university education, the historical basis of premedical education, and the direction of the premedical education curriculum. Historically, as medical education was incorporated into the university education system, premedical education developed based on basic science and liberal arts education. Accordingly, the direction of the premedical education curriculum began to split into two approaches: one believing in a basic science-based education intended to serve as the foundation of medical training, and the other believing in a liberal arts-based education intended to cultivate the qualities of a doctor. In recent years, however, the binary division in the direction of premedical education has ceased to exist, and the paradigm has now shifted to an agreement that premedical education must cultivate the basic scientific competence required for learning medical knowledge as well as the social qualities that a doctor should have, which are cultivated through the liberal arts. Furthermore, it has been asserted that the direction of premedical education should move toward the qualities that will be required in the future. With the fourth industrial revolution underway, the role of doctors is now being re-examined. This means that today's medical education must change in a future-oriented way, and the direction of the premedical education curriculum must be on the same page.

Remarks for Basic Medical Education Quality Improvement of Yonsei University in Korea (기본의학 교육과정 개선 방안 - 연세의대 광혜교육과정을 중심으로 -)

  • Ryue, Sook-Hee;Ahn, Duk Sun;Lee, Won Taek;Park, Jeon Han;Jung, Hyun Su;Park, Mu Seuk;Yang, Eun Bae
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.11 no.2
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    • pp.15-24
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    • 2009
  • Medical Students' competencies depend on the medical school curriculum. Basic medical education, in particular, is an important starting point for further medical competency development. We aimed to identify the most important areas of reform in the basic medical education curriculum of Yonsei Medical School. To accomplish this, we sought case studies of different medical schools and discussion points for quality improvement methods. A qualitative comparison method saturated through the systematic discussions on the emerging thematic approaches to determine the current directions in medical school curriculum reform. The discussions, which involved 7 experts, spanned 8 months and were based on a literature review, with focus on the 7 selected case studies. From the discussions, we concluded that in order to improve basic medical education curriculum, the following measures need to be carried out. First, an outcome-based curriculum is to be designed. The expected outcome is to be deliberately and succinctly defined and should be expressed as teaching and learning objectives. Second, the core subjects and elective subjects are to be classified on the basis of the aim, content, and passage level of the subjects. Hence, the core curriculum must be treated as a standard part of medical knowledge, and the elective curriculum must be richer and more in-depth. Third, universities should institutionalize regular evaluation of their departments. Appropriate and just evaluations should be made, and feedback given to the school's administrative department. Fourth, the departmental and administrative management of the basic medical education curriculum should be harmonized with each other. Finally, teaching and learning resources are to be increased and diversified and made available to professors and students for basic medical education.

Human and Society-Centered Learning Outcomes in Basic Medical Education (사람과 사회 중심의 기본의학 학습성과)

  • Kim, Dae Hyun
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.18 no.3
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    • pp.150-155
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    • 2016
  • Learning objectives for human and society-centered basic medical education to improve physicians' ability to practice in a Korean context were developed by the Korean Association of Medical Colleges in 2015-2016. The task-force committee identified eight domains for medical practitioners: human illness, reflection and self-improvement, patient safety, communication and collaboration, medical ethics, legal issues, social accountability, and professionalism. A total of 172 enabling learning outcomes and 42 terminal learning outcomes were identified by the workshop. The workshop members were representatives from 41 medical schools, the Korean Medical Association, and a scientific group (medical ethics, legal issues, and medical communication). The curriculum for "medical humanity and social medicine" was first published in 2007. The human and society-centered learning objectives that were developed will be revised annually.

The Change of Basic and Postgraduate Medical Education after Intern Training System Dismantling (인턴수련제도 폐지에 따른 기본의학교육-졸업 후 의학교육의 변화)

  • Kim, Byung Soo
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.15 no.2
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    • pp.69-74
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    • 2013
  • This study aimed to review the expected changes in the medical educational environment and to evaluate approaches to coping with the abolition of the postgraduate intern training system. It is expected that after the intern training system is dismantled, postgraduate medical students will be deprived of the opportunity to practice opportunity for clinical practice and to inquire into their medical specialization. Therefore, major improvements in the clinical education curriculum must be made so that students can do so through the clinical education program. Offering students the opportunity to perform clinical practice through the clinical education program might require a revision in the laws and regulations on clinical education as well as the standardization of the clinical education curriculum in line with international practices. Reform measures to provide students the opportunity to inquire their specializations might be the introduction of a medical curriculum containing diverse fields and the establishment of a matching program to assign medical students to their residency programs after medical school. Finally, the fact that the basic concern of postgraduate medical education is the cultivation of primary care physicians must not be forgotten even after the dismantling of the postgraduate intern training system.

A Survey on the Educational Status of Basic Korean Medicine and Basic Medical Science in Colleges of Korean Medicine in 2020 (2020년 전국한의과대학 기초한의학 및 기초의학 교육현황 조사)

  • Kim, Mikyung;Han, Chang-ho
    • The Journal of Korean Medicine
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    • v.41 no.3
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    • pp.98-124
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    • 2020
  • Objectives: This study was aimed to present a summary and analysis of a survey on the educational status of basic Korean medicine and basic medical science in colleges of Korean medicine nationwide. Methods: The data on the curriculum and weekly education plans were acquired in the first half of 2020. Data showing the educational status and contents of basic Korean medicine and basic medical science were extracted. Results: Most of the colleges were providing a subject-based education. All subjects of basic Korean medicine were included in the required courses for majors, and most of them appeared to have developed and been using common main textbooks and standardized educational contents. However, there were some subjects in which the education period was dispersed until the 3rd and 4th grades, or in which discussions to develop and use common textbooks and standardized educational content were required. Most of the subjects of basic medical science were also educated as required courses for majors, but there were some subjects with a low curriculum establishment rate, and these could be considered as areas to be reinforced first when reorganizing the curriculum. Conclusions: It is expected that the findings of this study would be a basis for exploring the ways to concrete changes that are desirable and also realistically feasible when reorganizing the curriculum of colleges of Korean medicine in the near future.

A Proposal for the Future of Medical Education Accreditation (의학교육 평가인증의 미래를 위한 제언)

  • Lim, Ki-Young
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.22 no.1
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    • pp.28-31
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    • 2020
  • For the past 20 years, the medical education accreditation program of Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation (KIMEE) has contributed greatly to the standardization and improvement of the quality of basic medical education in Korea. Now, it contributes to establishing and promoting the future of medical education. Since its inception in 2019, Accreditation Standard of KIMEE 2019 (ASK2019) aims to achieve world-class medical education through the application of learner-centered curriculum using a continuum framework for the three phases of formal medical education: basic medical education, post-graduate medical education, and continuing professional development. ASK2019 also promotes medical education which meets community needs and employs systematic assessments throughout the education process. These are important changes that can be used to gauge the future of the medical education accreditation system. Furthermore, internationalization, interprofessional education, health systems science, and on-going, permanent self-assessment systems in every medical school are emerging as important topics for the future of medical education. It's time for the medical education accreditation system in Korea to observe and adopt new trends in global medical education.

A Study on the Current Status of the Curriculum Operation of the Basic Medical Sciences in Nursing Education (간호학교육에서 기초의.과학 교과운영에 대한 연구)

  • 최명애;신기수
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing
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    • v.27 no.4
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    • pp.975-987
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    • 1997
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate the current status of curriculum operation of the basic medical sciences in nursing education at college of nursing, department of nursing and junior college of nursing, ultimately to provide the basic data to improve a curriculum of basic medical science in nursing education. 78 professors who were in charge of basic medical science at 22 colleges of nursing and department of nursing, and 20 junior colleges of nursing responded the questionnaire consisted of 22 question items about the status of objectives, lectures, laboratory practice and characteristics of professors, and mailed to the author. The findings of this study were as follows : 1. The subjects of basic medical science were identified as physiology, anatomy, biochemistry, pathology, microbiology, pharmacology in the most colleges of nursing and junior colleges of nursing. 2 colleges of nursing and department of nursing(9.1%) and 19 junior colleges of nursing(95%) did not open biochemistry, 1 college of nursing and department of nursing(5%) did not open pathology and pharmacology. 2 Junior colleges of nursing(10%) did not open pharmacology, 1 junior college of nursing(5%) did not open pathology, the other 1 junior college of nursing did not open microbiology. 2. Credits of the subjects were ranged from 1 to 4. Lecture hours of one semester of physiology at school of nursing and junior college of nursing was average 103.6 and average 102.67, that of anatomy was average 127.1 and average 98, that of microbiology was average 109.7 and average 86.33, that of biochemistry was average 105, that of pathology was average 91 and average 94, that of pharmacology was average 86 and average 85.75. 3. Most of schools used 1 textbook for lectures, 3 school of nursing and department of nursing recommended references without using textbook, while all 36 junior colleges of nursing used textbooks. 4. 5 among 10 schools of nursing and department of nursing had a laboratory practice in physiology, 4 among 7 schools in anatomy, 4 among 6 schools in biochemistry, 2 among 6 schools in pathology 5 among 6 schools in microbiology. Not all the schools had a laboratory practice in pharmacology. 4 among 9 junior colleges of nursing had a laboratory practice in physiology. 1 among 4 schools in anatomy, 2 among 7 schools in microbiology. Not all the junior colleges of nursing had a laboratory practice in pathology and pharmacology. 11 among 20 colleges of nursing and department of nursing, 4 among 7 junior schools of nursing used a textbook of laboratory practice. 5. All the subjects at school of nursing and department of nursing responded that content of lectures and laboratory practices of basic medical science should be different from that of medical education, 34 junior schools of nursing responded that content of lecture of basic medical science in nursing education should be different from that of medical education. 33 junior schools of nursing responded that content of practice of basic medical science in nursing education should be different from that of medical education. 6. The final degree of 25 professors who were in charge of basic medical science were doctors of. medicine, that of 5 professors were masters of medicine, that of 5 were doctor of pharmacology, that of 2 were a master of pharmacology, that of 1 was physical science. The final degree of 8 professors who were in charge of basic medical science were masters of medicine, 7 doctors of medicine, 4 masters of nursing science, 4 masters of pharmacology, 2 doctors of nursing, 2 doctors of physical science, 2 doctors of pharmacology and 1 master of public health. 9 full professors, 13 associate professors, 11 assist ant professors, 3 full time instructors, and 6 part time instructors were in charge of basic medical science at college of nursing and department of nursing, 20 part time instructors, 8 associate professors, 6 assistant professors, and 2 full professors were in charge of has basic medical science at junior college of nursing. Based on these results, curriculum of basic medical science in nursing education should be reviewed deeply based on nursing model.

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Needs Assessment of Medical Students During Clerkship About Basic Medical Science: Focused on 'Learning Outcome of Basic Medical Education: Scientific Concept and Principle-centered' (임상실습 중 의과대학생의 기초의학 관련 요구도 조사: '기본의학교육 학습성과: 과학적 개념과 원리중심')

  • Park, Hye Jin;Kim, Dae Hyun;Park, Won Kyun;Kum, Dong yoon;Kwon, Seon Young;Kim, Jae Bum;Kim, Jin Hee;Hwang, Il Seon;Kim, Min Seo
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.18 no.2
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    • pp.65-82
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    • 2016
  • This study aimed to identify curriculum gaps and a pilot study to provide the programs for selection during clerkship. Over the course of a clerkship, students analyze the current level and the needs level of TLO (terminal learning objectives) based on the book "Learning outcome of basic medical education: Scientific concept and principle-centered." We conducted a needs assessment utilizing a t-test, Borich Needs Assessment, and the Locus for Focus model. In the investigation of the needs level, the levels of the musculoskeletal and respiratory systems were relatively high and in the investigation of the current level, the levels of the digestive and musculoskeletal systems were relatively high. This study is expected to contribute to reasonable decision-making by utilizing various methods of analysis and providing in-depth results of needs analysis in designing clerkship curriculum.

History and Future of the Korean Medical Education System (우리나라 의사양성체제의 역사와 미래)

  • Ahn, Duck-Sun;Han, Hee-Jin
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.20 no.2
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    • pp.65-71
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    • 2018
  • Western medicine was first introduced to Korea by Christian missionaries and then by the Japanese in the late 19th century without its historical, philosophical, cultural, social, political, and economic values being communicated. Specifically, during the Japanese colonial era, only ideologically 'degenerated' medicine was taught to Koreans and the main orthodox stream of medicine was inaccessible. Hence, Korean medical education not only focuses on basic and clinical medicine, but also inherited hierarchical discrimination and structural violence. After Korea's liberation from Japan and the Korean war, the Korean medical education system was predominantly influenced by Americans and the Western medical education system was adopted by Korea beginning in the 1980s. During this time, ethical problems arose in Korean medical society and highlighted a need for medical humanities education to address them. For Korean medical students who are notably lacking humanistic and social culture, medical humanities education should be emphasized in the curriculum. In the Fourth Industrial Revolution, human physicians may only be distinguishable from robot physicians by ethical consciousness; consequentially, the Korean government should invest more of its public funds to develop and establish a medical humanities program in medical colleges. Such an improved medical education system in Korea is expected to foster talented physicians who are also respectable people.