• Title/Summary/Keyword: broiler chicken growth

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Comparative Study of Red Ginseng and White Ginseng (I) -Effect of Red and White Ginseng on the growth of Broiler Chicken- (홍삼(紅蔘)과 백삼(白蔘)의 비교연구(比較硏究)(I) -홍삼과 백삼이 육용추(肉用雛)의 발육에 미치는 영향-)

  • Han, Dae-Suk;Bae, Dae-Sik
    • Korean Journal of Pharmacognosy
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    • v.7 no.3
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    • pp.225-232
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    • 1976
  • To compare the effects of red Ginseng and white Ginseng on the growth of experimental animals, both Ginseng were given to Broiler male chicken. Red and white Ginseng were administered to Broiler chicken in doses of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4g per kg weight of chicken. The increase in weight were 282g in red Ginseng group and 162g in white Ginseng group compared with control group. The increase of the feeding amounts per kg weight were 2.4kg for red Ginseng group, 2.67kg for white Ginseng group and 2.87kg for non-treated group. The growth of each organ in the red Ginseng group showed favorable increase trend than white Ginseng group as a whole and, particularly, considerable significance were observed in liver and brain. These results suggest that red Ginseng has better effect on the growth of chicken and organ than white Ginseng does.

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The effects of exogenous insulin-like growth factor-I on broiler chicken growth (외인성 insulin-like growth factor-I이 육계의 성장에 미치는 영향)

  • Lee, Ho-il;Lee, Moon-joon;Lee, Dae-yeoul;Kim, Young-ann;Kang, Chang-won;Chon, Seung-ki
    • Korean Journal of Veterinary Research
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    • v.34 no.3
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    • pp.457-463
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    • 1994
  • Insulin-like growth factor-I(IGF-I) plays an important role in the regulation of mammalian and poultry growth. IGF-I has many actions in different tissues, which include metabolic, mitogenic, and differentiative actions. IGF-I induces insulin-like effects - such as increased cell glucose uptake and glycogen sysnthesis, however several physiological actions of IGF-I may not have been identified yet. In order to investigate the effect on growth in broiler chicken treated with exogenous insulin-like growth factor-I, 30 chickens were injected $50{\mu}g$ reconbinant human IGF- I (rhIGF- I ) per kg body weight as experimental group and 30 ckickens saline subcutanously as control, 3 times according to ages from 2 to 35 days. We established radioimmunoassay method by which we can measure chicken IGF- I (cIGF- I ) as in rhIGF- I assay. The results obtained were as follows; 1) The dilution curve showed in parallelism between rhIGF- I and cIGF- I in the Sep-pak $C_{18}$ cartridge plasma extracts. 2) The body weight of broiler chicken were significantly increased at 31 days($1,176.50{\pm}99.79g$) and 35 days($1,252.84{\pm}125.21g$) of age in treatment groups, compared with control group($1,011.88{\pm}40.22g,\;1,111.32{\pm}153.67g$). The liver and kidney weights on 35 days$(35.24{\pm}5.18g,\;11.05{\pm}1.47g)$ were significantly higher in rhIGF- I treated group than control group($30.95{\pm}4.04g,\;10.01{\pm}1.60g$) 3) The plasma concentration of IGF- l and total protein in rhIGF- I treated group were $58.17{\pm}1.69ng/ml$, $3.75{\pm}0.62g/dl$ respectively compared with control group $45.70{\pm}1.64ng/ml$, $2.32{\pm}0.53g/dl$. The results suggest that exogenous rhIGF- I increased total body weight, liver and kidney weights in broiler chicken, and it may increase IGF- I and total protein concentration in serum.

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Effects of Two Herbal Extracts and Virginiamycin Supplementation on Growth Performance, Intestinal Microflora Population and Fatty Acid Composition in Broiler Chickens

  • Ramiah, Suriya Kumari;Zulkifli, Idrus;Rahim, Nordiana Asyikin Abdul;Ebrahimi, Mahdi;Meng, Goh Yong
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.27 no.3
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    • pp.375-382
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    • 2014
  • The competency of garlic and pennywort to improve broiler chicken growth and influence intestinal microbial communities and fatty acid composition of breast meat were studied. Two hundred forty, "day-old" chicks were randomly allocated to 4 treatment groups consisting of 6 replications of 10 chicks in each pen. The groups were assigned to receive treatment diets as follows: i) basal diet (control), ii) basal diet plus 0.5% garlic powder (GP), iii) basal diet plus 0.5% pennywort powder (PW) and iv) 0.002% virginiamycin (VM). Birds were killed at day 42 and intestinal samples were collected to assess for Lactobacillus and Escherichia coli. The pectoralis profundus from chicken breast samples was obtained from 10 birds from each treatment group on day 42 and frozen at $-20^{\circ}C$ for further analyses. Fatty acid profile of breast muscles was determined using gas liquid chromatography. Feed intake and weight gain of broilers fed with GP, PW, and VM were significantly higher (p<0.05) compared to control. Feeding chicks GP, PW, and VM significantly reduced Escherichia coli count (p<0.05) while Lactobacillus spp count were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the gut when compared to control group on day 42. Supplemented diet containing pennywort increased the C18:3n-3 fatty acid composition of chickens' breast muscle. Garlic and pennywort may be useful in modulating broiler guts as they control the enteropathogens that help to utilize feed efficiently. This subsequently enhances the growth performances of broiler chickens.

Effect of Dietary Cinnamon Powder on Savor and Quality of Chicken Meat in Broiler Chickens (닭고기의 품질 및 맛에 관한 계피 급여효과)

  • Park, Byung-Sung
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
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    • v.37 no.5
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    • pp.618-624
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    • 2008
  • A 35-day trial was carried out to determine the influence of dietary cinnamon powder (CNP) on the sensory evaluation and quality of chicken meat, carcass characteristics, plasma lipid level and growth performance of broiler chickens. There were 5 treatment groups: control; CNP 2.0%; CNP 3.0%; CNP 4.0%; and CNP 5.0%. The body weight of the broilers fed the diets containing 3.0% CNP was higher than the broilers fed the control feeds (p<0.05). The concentration of triacylglyceride, HDL-C was higher in the plasma from broiler chickens fed diets with CNP (p<0.05) but the concentrations of total cholesterol and LDL-C were significantly lower (p<0.05) compared to the control group. The carcass percentage, chicken breast and thigh weight were not different between the CNP and control groups. The WHC was significantly higher in the chickens fed 4% CNP diet, while the TBARS was significantly lower (p<0.05) in the chickens fed 3% CNP diet compared to the control group. The color of the breast muscle from the chickens fed 3% CNP diet was lighter than those from the control groups (p<0.05). The sensory evaluation of the taste and savor related to CNP in fried or boiled chicken meat were significantly better from the broiler chicken fed diets containing CNP than the control group (p<0.05). These results suggest that dietary cinnamon powder may improve savor and quality of chicken meat in broiler chickens.

Comparison of Growth Performance, Carcass Characteristics and Meat Quality of Korean Local Chickens and Silky Fowl

  • Choo, Y.K.;Kwon, H.J.;Oh, S.T.;Um, J.S.;Kim, B.G.;Kang, C.W.;Lee, S.K.;An, B.K.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.27 no.3
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    • pp.398-405
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    • 2014
  • This study was conducted to compare growth performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality of 4 breeds of local chicken. A total of 480 1-d-old chicks were distributed to 16 pens, with 4 treatments of breed, 4 replicates and 30 chicks per pen. Three Korean local breeds of white-mini broiler, Hanhyup-3-ho, and Woorimatdag, and a breed of silky fowl were raised under identical rearing and feeding conditions for 31-d, 37-d, 36-d, and 59-d, respectively. The BW and feed consumption on a pen basis were weekly measured for all pens, and ADFI, ADG and gain:feed were calculated for each pen. The ADFI and ADG of 3 breeds of Korean local chicken were greater than those of silky fowl (p<0.05). Within the Korean local breeds, ADFI of white-mini broiler was the highest (p<0.05), and ADG of Hanhyup-3-ho and white-mini broiler was the highest (p<0.05). Gain:feed of silky fowl was less than that of the 3 breeds of Korean local chicken. The carcass and breast yield of white-mini broiler were the greater than those of other breeds (p<0.05). The breast meat color (CIE $L^*$, $a^*$, and $b^*$) of 3 breeds of Korean local chicken were higher than that of silky fowl (p<0.05). The breast meat of Hanhyup-3-ho had greater cooking loss (p<0.05), whereas water holding capacity and pH were less than those of other breeds (p<0.05). The color score of 3 breeds of Korean local chicken was higher than that of silky fowl (p<0.05). Woorimatdag had a higher score on tenderness (p<0.05), whereas flavor score was less than that of other breeds (p<0.05). In conclusion, 4 local breeds of chicken have some unique features and seem to have more advantages, and this information can help consumers who prefer healthy and premium chicken meat.

Effect of Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) on Abdominal Fat Deposition in Yellow-feather Broiler Chickens and Its Possible Mechanism

  • Zhou, J.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.21 no.12
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    • pp.1760-1765
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    • 2008
  • A total of 60 one-day-old Yellow-feather broiler chickens were allotted into treatment and control groups. The treatment group was fed with the diet supplemented with 3% conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) for 48 d, while control group was fed with the diet supplemented with 3% rapeseed oil. Chickens were slaughtered in each group at the age of 49 d, and the blood and the abdominal adipose tissue were sampled. Serum cLeptin and serum cAdiponectin were measured by ELISA. The total RNA was extracted from adipose tissue to measure the abundance of the chicken growth hormone receptor (cGHR), insulin-like growth factor 1 (cIGF-1), insulin-like growth factor I receptor (cIGF-IR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma ($cPPAR{\gamma}$), cAdiponectin and cAdipoIR mRNA by RT-PCR using ${\beta}$-actin as an internal standard. Results showed that the CLA decreased the abdominal fat index by 20.93% (p<0.05). The level of serum cLeptin but not serum cAdiponectin was significantly increased by CLA treatment (p<0.05). CLA down-regulated the relative abundance of cGH-R mRNA and $cPPAR{\gamma}$ mRNA in abdominal adipose tissue by 24.74% (p<0.05) and 66.52% (p<0.01) respectively. However, no differences were found between CLA treatment group and control group (p>0.05) in the relative abundance of cIGF-1, cIGF-IR, cAdiponectin, and cAdipoIR mRNA in abdominal adipose tissue. The data suggested that CLA inhibited abdominal fat deposition in broiler chicken may be determined by decreasing the GHR available for GH, and by inhibiting the differentiation of preadipocytes via down-regulation of $PPAR{\gamma}$, but independent of IGF and (or) GH-IGF pathway or adiponectin action.

Effects of honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) venom by water supply on the performance of broiler chicken (봉독의 급수투여가 육계의 생산성에 미치는 영향)

  • Han, Sang-Mi;Lee, Kwang-Gill;Yeo, Joo-Hong;Oh, Baeg-Young;Kim, Bong-Soon;Lee, Woong;Kim, Soon-Tae
    • Korean Journal of Veterinary Service
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    • v.33 no.2
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    • pp.177-183
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    • 2010
  • This study was conducted to investigate the antibiotic effects of bee venom (Apis mellifera) on the growth performance and blood characteristics in broiler chicken. 1-day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into 3 groups with 3 replicates of 5,000 birds each. The treatments were control without antibiotic and bee venom, 0.5ppm or 1ppm bee venom. The final body weight and body weight gain were significantly higher in bee venom than control (P<0.05). The feed conversion ratio in all treated groups were significantly improved as compared to that of control (P<0.05). No significant differences among the groups were observed in the contents of total cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total protein, albumin and globulin in blood serum. The white blood cell, red blood cell, heterophil, lymphocyte, and stress indicator (heterophil:lymphocyte rate) were not significantly different among the groups. The superoxide dismutase-like activities in the groups that were water containing bee venom were significantly increased compared to those in the control group (P<0.05). It has been suggested that bee venom promotes the growth of broilers without any negative effect when added in broiler water.

Growth Data of Broiler Chickens Fitted to Gompertz Function

  • Duan-yai, S.;Young, B.A.;Lisle, A.;Coutts, J.A.;Gaughan, J.B.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.12 no.8
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    • pp.1177-1180
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    • 1999
  • This study describes the growth of broiler chickens to the two forms of Gompertz function for application in broiler production models. The first form is based on the estimated mature weight ($W_A$), while the second is based on the estimated hatch weight ($W_O$). Both equations gave identical estimation because they are mathematically identical. To fit the growth curve of commercial broilers that marketed at 35-42 days, it is unnecessary to keep broilers to near maturity (> day 140) to obtain growth data for deriving the Gompertz function. This date does not improve the curve fitting of the early growing period. Additionally, a high mortality and health problem occurred to this type of chicken after day 105.

Effects of Feeding Rancid Rice Bran on Growth Performance and Chicken Meat Quality in Broiler Chicks

  • Chae, B.J.;Lee, K.H.;Lee, S.K.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.15 no.2
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    • pp.266-273
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    • 2002
  • A total of 225 day-old broiler chicks (43.08 g initial body weight) were allotted to three dietary treatments for a 6-week feeding trial. The treatments were 1) Control (defatted rice bran; DFRB), 2) fresh rice bran (FRB) and 3) rancid rice bran (RRB). Rice brans were intentionally spoiled by two degrees of rancidity by the values of free fatty acids (FFA): 7.6% (FRB) and 16.3% (RRB). Diets were prepared on an isonutrient basis, and defatted or rancid rice brans were included 5 and 10% for starter (0-3 week) and finisher (3-6 week), respectively. At the end of the feeding trial, six chicks per treatment were sacrificed, and thigh meats were ground and stored at $1^{\circ}C$ for thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and peroxide value (POV) analyses. For a digestibility, 48 growing chicks (4 weeks old) were employed in cages (3 replicates/treatment, 2 birds/cage) according to the experimental design: FRB, RRB, pelleted and extruded rice bran. Some of the FRB were pelleted ($70^{\circ}C$) or extruded ($110^{\circ}C$). There was no significant difference in growth performance during the starter period, but chicks fed a diet containing DFRB grew faster (p<0.05) with increased feed intake (p<0.05) than those fed diets containing rice brans, FRB or RRB, during the finisher period. Feed conversion ratio in the RRB was inferior (p<0.05) to the DFRB. Between rice bran groups, weight gain was higher (pco.os) in FRB than in RRB during finisher period. There was a similar trend in growth performance of chicks for the overall period (0-6 week) as the finisher period. Dry matter and energy digestibilities were higher (p<0.05) in extruded than in RRB group. Protein digestibility was improved (p<0.05) when rice bran was extruded, but not pelleted. The chicken meats from RRB showed higher (p<0.05) TBARS than those from FRB during storage for 4 weeks at $1^{\circ}C$. In conclusion, it would appear that feeding rancid rice bran gave negative effects on growth performance and lipid stability of meat in broiler chicks.

Forsythia suspensa Extract Has the Potential to Substitute Antibiotic in Broiler Chicken

  • Han, X.;Piao, X.S.;Zhang, H.Y.;Li, P.F.;Yi, J.Q.;Zhang, Q.;Li, P.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.25 no.4
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    • pp.569-576
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    • 2012
  • Two experiments were conducted to investigate the potential for Forsythia suspensa extract (FSE) to substitute for antibiotic in broiler chicken. First, a well-diffusion assay procedure and a 2-fold dilution method were used to determine the bacteriostatic activity of FSE on Escherichia coli K88, staphylococcus aureus, and salmonella was assayed. An inhibitory effect of FSE was observed on the growth of these bacteria. This effect seems to be dose depended, which disappeared after 25.00, 12.50, 1.56 mg/ml. Second, a 42-d trial with 252 broiler chickens (d 1, $38.7{\pm}1.1$ g BW) was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary supplementation of FSE in broiler chicken. The feeding program consisted of a starter diet from d 1 to 21 and a finisher diet from d 22 to 42. Dietary treatments included were: i) NC: negative control fed a corn-soybean meal based diet; ii) PC: positive control group fed based diet with chlortetracycline; and iii) FC: a test group fed with 100 mg FSE/kg diet. In this study growth performance did not differ among treatments during the starter period. However, dietary supplemental chlortetracycline and FSE increased (p<0.05) average daily gain (ADG), average daily feed intake (ADFI) compared with NC during the finisher and overall phase. Apparent digestibility of calcium on d 21, digestibility of energy and calcium on d 42 of FC was greater (p<0.05) than NC. Moreover, cecal Escherichia coli counts for birds from FC were lower (p<0.05) than NC. Dietary FSE supplementation also improved (p<0.05) villus height and villus height to crypt depth ratios in both duodenum and ileum and decreased (p<0.05) crypt depth in the duodenum. Duodenum villus height and villus height to crypt depth ratio in both duodenum and ileum from the FC group were also greater (p<0.05). Serum growth hormone and IGF-1 were not influenced by different treatments. Apparently, FSE has the potential to substitute for antibiotic in broiler chicken.