• Title, Summary, Keyword: Palliative care

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Integration of Palliative Care in the Hospital Setting

  • Wozencraft, Colin;Tucker, Rodney O.;Howell, Stephen
    • Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care
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    • v.15 no.4
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    • pp.188-192
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    • 2012
  • Palliative medicine has shown demonstrated benefit for patients with serious illness, their families, and hospital systems. As such, the demand for palliative care services is growing at a fast pace, and health care facilities frequently struggle to develop and implement effective and sustainable methods of providing this care. As with any new system, challenges and barriers naturally exist to instituting palliative care. Undertaking careful assessment, planning, and resource allocation can provide the greatest likelihood of success when developing these novel yet much needed models of care. This summary paper offers a qualitative overview of the potential benefits and the rationale to implement robust palliative care systems. We briefly review the history of palliative medicine in the broadest sense and address several seminal works from the US palliative care literature. Core practices to establish and advance palliative medicine are suggested. Commentary is provided on some of the particular barriers to palliative system development that may need to be addressed in the context of Korean medical culture. Collectively, we hope this overview can contribute to a framework within which such research and development can occur, leading to increasingly effective and sustainable palliative medicine in Korea.

Barriers to Early Palliative Care

  • Yoon, Seok-Joon
    • Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care
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    • v.23 no.4
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    • pp.252-255
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    • 2020
  • This article aims to discuss the barriers hindering cancer patients from receiving early palliative care, which has been demonstrated to be more effective in improving quality of life and controlling symptoms. Specifically, there are barriers in four aspects of delivering early palliative care. First, the difficulty of starting discussions about early palliative care and the lack of adequate appointment time can impede communication between oncologists and patients and their family members. Second, determining the timing of referral and deciding upon and applying a standard for referral can be barriers in the process of referral from oncology to palliative care. Third, palliative care patients and their family members can face difficulties regarding in what format and by whom the services will be delivered. Fourth, biases, misinformation, and inaccurate beliefs can be barriers in the process of patients and their family members accepting care. In order to facilitate early palliative care, research and policy regarding these barriers are necessary, along with efforts made by medical staff.

Advances in Hospice and Palliative Care in Japan: A Review Paper

  • Mori, Masanori;Morita, Tatsuya
    • Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care
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    • v.19 no.4
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    • pp.283-291
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    • 2016
  • Over the past decade, hospice and palliative care in Japan have progressed rapidly under the national policies supported by the Cancer Control Act. The numbers of palliative care units/inpatient hospices, hospital palliative care teams, and clinics with a home hospice function have been steadily increasing. The increasing numbers of physicians, nurses, and pharmacists have been certified as specialists in palliative care by national associations. Collaborative efforts have been made to standardize and disseminate educational programs and training opportunities in undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing medical education. Research activities in Japan have markedly contributed to the growing body of evidence, especially in the fields of terminal delirium, terminal dehydration, palliative sedation, care for dying patients, prognostication, communication, psycho-oncology, and regional palliative care programs. This review focuses on major palliative care settings, specialty, national associations, education, and research in palliative care in Japan.

Existential Issues and Psychosocial Interventions in Palliative Care

  • Lee, Jae-Hon
    • Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care
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    • v.23 no.4
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    • pp.167-171
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    • 2020
  • The finite nature of human existence leads many to search for meaning, which comes into sharper relief for those who are imminently facing death. Therefore, universal existential concerns such as the inevitability of death, existential isolation, loss of meaning, freedom, and dignity are inherent psychological issues in palliative care. Consequently, one of the critical challenges facing palliative care is how to address these issues effectively. This paper provides an overview of common themes of existential concerns and psychotherapeutic interventions to address existential distress among patients in palliative care.

The relationship between Terminal Care Stress and Knowledge and Perception of Hospice-Palliative Care among Pediatric Nurses (아동간호사의 호스피스·완화의료에 대한 지식, 인식과 임종간호 스트레스)

  • Park, Eunyoung;Bang, Kyung-Sook
    • Perspectives in Nursing Science
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    • v.16 no.2
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    • pp.55-64
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    • 2019
  • Purpose: This study examined the knowledge and perception of hospice-palliative care and terminal care stress among pediatric nurses, and the relationships among these variables. Methods: In this descriptive research study, 154 pediatric nurses who experienced terminal care at least once were surveyed. This study used three scales, including the Palliative Care Quiz for Nursing (PCQN), Perception of Hospice-Palliative Care, and Terminal care stress. Data analyses using SPSS 22.0 included descriptive statistics, independent t-test, one-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, and stepwise multiple linear regression. Results: Terminal care stress experienced by the pediatric nurses was significantly related to the perception of hospice-palliative care; the hospice-palliative care education program enhanced the knowledge and perception of hospice-palliative care. Conclusion: Hospice-palliative care education programs should be developed and provided for pediatric nurses to improve pediatric hospice-palliative care. Additionally, further research on this topic is required because the present results are inconsistent with previous and current researches.

Palliative Care Models in Intensive Care Units and Nurses' Roles in the Models (중환자실 완화의료 모델과 간호사의 역할)

  • Koh, Chin-Kang
    • Journal of Korean Critical Care Nursing
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    • v.7 no.1
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    • pp.40-46
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    • 2014
  • Purpose: In Korea, about 30,000 people die in intensive care units annually. However, their quality of life at the end-of-life seems very low. The purpose of this study was to describe palliative care models that could be applied in intensive care units and examine nurses' roles in the models. Methods: A conventional literature review was performed focusing on palliative care in intensive care units and nursing roles in the approaches identified. Results: There are two different models regarding the implementation of palliative care approaches in the intensive care unit. Those are the consultative model and the integrative model. Each model has advantages and disadvantages. Therefore, an appropriate model must be chosen according to the setting. Nurses' roles could vary depending on the setting. Conclusion: Palliative care in the intensive care unit is important to improve patients' quality of life. Moreover, nursing roles are important in providing comprehensive palliative care in intensive care units.

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Do Korean Doctors Think a Palliative Consultation Team Would Be Helpful to Their Terminal Cancer Patients?

  • Shim, Hye-Young;Chang, Yoon Jung;Kawk, Kiu-Sang;Mai, Tran Thi Xuan;Choi, Jin Young;Ahn, Eun Mi;Jho, Hyun Jung;Park, So-Jung
    • Cancer Research and Treatment
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    • v.49 no.2
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    • pp.437-445
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    • 2017
  • Purpose Hospice and palliative care services (HPC) are not commonly utilized in Korea; however, palliative care teams (PCTs) have been found to be effective at addressing the shortcomings in HPC. In this study, we attempted to outline unmet palliative care needs of terminal cancer patients and the potential benefits of PCTs as perceived by doctors in Korea. Materials and Methods We surveyed 474 doctors at 10 cancer-related academic conferences from June to November 2014 with a self-report questionnaire to assess their perceptions of end-of-life care needs and the expected effects of PCTs on caring for terminal cancer patients. Among those surveyed, 440 respondents who completed the entire questionnaire were analyzed. Results In all domains, fewer participants reported satisfaction with palliative care services than those reporting needs (p < 0.001). The surveyed participants also reported difficulties with a shortage of time for treatment, psychological burden, lack of knowledge regarding hospice care, lengths of stay, and palliative ward availability. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that female doctors (odds ratio [OR], 2.672; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.035 to 6.892), doctors who agreed that referring my patients to a HPC means I must give up on my patient (OR, 3.075; 95% CI, 1.324 to 7.127), and doctors who had no experience with HPC education (OR, 3.337; 95% CI, 1.600 to 7.125) were associated with higher expected effectiveness of PCT activities. Conclusion The PCT activities were expected to fill the doctor's perceived unmet HPC needs of terminal cancer patients and difficulties in communications.

Policy on Hospice and Palliative Care in Korea (말기암환자 완화의료정책 현황)

  • Chang, Yoon-Jung
    • Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care
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    • v.15 no.4
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    • pp.183-187
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    • 2012
  • The importance of palliative care for terminal cancer patients has been emphasized globally. Korea has formulated and implemented its policy for cancer control as it drew up a 10-year plan for cancer patient care. We examined Korea's National Cancer Act and the second 10-year plan for cancer patient care, which are legal grounds for palliative care projects for terminal cancer patients, to check the current status of Korea's efforts to establish a hospice and palliative care system. Institutionalization of hospice and palliative care has been developed within a framework of the national cancer project. Efforts such as expansion of hospice units, experts training and quality improvement should continue after the reimbursement of hospice and palliative care begins in 2013.

Factors Influencing Compassion Fatigue among Hospice and Palliative Care Unit Nurses

  • Cho, Eun-Ju;Cho, Hun Ha
    • Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care
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    • v.24 no.1
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    • pp.13-25
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    • 2021
  • Purpose: This descriptive study aimed to explore nursing workplace spirituality, end-of-life care stress, and resilience as factors influencing compassion fatigue among nurses working in hospice and palliative care units. Methods: Data were collected using a self-report questionnaire completed by 146 nurses at 14 hospice and palliative care institutions across South Korea who had worked in a hospice and palliative care institution for at least 6 months and had experience providing end-of-life care. Data were collected from February 25, 2019 to April 12, 2019, and analyzed using SPSS for Windows version 18.0. As appropriate, descriptive statistics, the t-test, analysis of variance, the Scheffé test, Pearson correlation coefficients, and stepwise multiple regression were used. Results: The survey results showed that factors influencing compassion fatigue were resilience, subjective health status, current satisfaction with the hospice ward, and end-of-life care stress. Higher levels of resilience, a subjective health status of "healthy", high levels of current satisfaction with the hospice ward, and lower levels of end-of-life care stress were associated with lower levels of compassion fatigue, explaining 42.9% of the total variance. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that resilience is an important factor mitigating compassion fatigue among nurses at hospice and palliative care institutions. Therefore, intervention programs should be developed to reduce compassion fatigue.

Effects of Hospice and Palliative Care Education on Knowledge of Hospice and Palliative Care and Attitude toward Death in Nursing Students (호스피스 교육이 간호대학생의 호스피스 지식과 죽음에 대한 태도에 미치는 영향)

  • Lee, Young-Eun;Choi, Eun-Joung;Park, Jung-Suk
    • Journal of Korean Public Health Nursing
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    • v.26 no.2
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    • pp.280-288
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    • 2012
  • Purpose: The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of hospice and palliative care education on knowledge of hospice and palliative care and attitude toward death in nursing students. Method: Subjects of this study included 49 nursing students. Using a one-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental research design, we conducted experiments to determine the effects of a hospice and palliative care education during a period of seven weeks from August through November 2009. The program was composed of seven sessions (total: 28hrs). The SPSS/Win 18.0 program was used for analysis of collected data. Results: A significant change in knowledge of hospice and palliative care and attitude toward death was observed after the intervention. Conclusion: The hospice and palliative care education was effective for nursing students in improving their attitude toward death and in increasing knowledge of hospice and palliative care. Therefore, I recommend generous application of this program to nursing students in order to improve knowledge of hospice and palliative care and attitude toward death.