• Title, Summary, Keyword: Oncology nurse practitioner

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The Role Behaviors of Oncology Nurse Specialist (종양전문간호사의 역할규명을 위한 연구)

  • Kim, Min-Young;Park, Sung-Ae
    • Asian Oncology Nursing
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    • v.3 no.1
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    • pp.24-44
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    • 2003
  • The purposes of this study was to identify and propose the expected role of the oncology nurse specialist by embodying role theory to oncology nurse specialist. The subjects of this study were 149 persons in 14 hospitals, who were classified to 4 groups, oncology nurse specialists(ONS) group, head nurses and charge nurses(HN & CN) group in hemato-oncology ward, registered nurses(RN) group in hemato-oncology ward, and hematologists & oncologists(H&O) group. The questionnaire which was consisted of 89 items for role of oncology nurse specialist, was made by researcher with a field study and literature review about role of oncology nurse specialist and verified by matrix delphi technique about content validity and construct validity. The data were collected from October 22, 2002 to November 5, 2002. All 4 groups proposed that ONS should perform an expert practitioner role first of all. But ONS group, RN group and H&O group proposed orderly expert practitioner, educator, researcher, consultant, and administrator & change agent, but HN & CN group did expert practitioner, educator, consultant, researcher, administrator & change agent. Expert practitioner had the most highest necessary degree in all groups and most highest performance degree in ONS group. That was consistent with results that all groups proposed role of expert practitioner at first. 4 items out of 20 items showed the meaningful differences between groups. For role of educator, oncology nurse specialist group proposed necessary degrees over 4.0 point out of 5.0 in all items. 4 items out of 18 items showed the meaningful differences between groups. For role of researcher, 3 nurses groups proposed a high necessary degree, but performance of ONS group was most lowest among 5 roles. 6 items out of 14 items showed the meaningful differences between groups. The role of consultant had high necessary degree in some items related to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. 2 items out of 17 items showed the meaningful differences between groups. In nursing behaviors of administrator & change agent, those items about enacting principle, cost development and participation of professional academy had a high necessary degree. 4 items out of 18 items showed the meaningful differences between groups. Oncology nurse specialists group performed 5 roles orderly, expert practitioner, consultant, educator, administrator & change agent, researcher. This result was different from expected role of themselves as well as the other groups. There was a different necessary degree between role and embodied nursing behaviors of role. ONS group and RN group proposed orderly educator, researcher, administrator & change agent, expert practitioner, consultant, but the other groups did educator, expert practitioner, researcher, consultant, administrator & change agent. The expected standards of oncology nurse specialist in this study were usually master's degree, total career of 5-7 years, oncology career of 3-5 years and certification. But for the post, qualification and qualification institution, various opinions were suggested. In the conclusion, there was a different necessary degree between role and embodied nursing behaviors of role. All groups proposed expert practitioner at first in abstract role, but educator at first in embodied nursing behaviors of role. So we have to consider this difference carefully in the future research. ONS acted the role of expert practitioner first of all, but we should develope and expand the roles of researcher, and administrator & change agent. We should enact roles by role behaviors induced from mutual agreements in necessary degree and performance degree, and bargain the role behaviors that showed the meaningful differences between groups But, we should consider carefully which group's opinion we have to select. I suggested 36 items out of 89 items, in which ONS proposed necessary degree over 4.0 out of 5.0 and half of them performed as the nursing behaviors of oncology nurse specialist that did not induce role stress. For the future, We should role bargain the role with other groups based on these items.

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Strategies to Develop a Korean-Contextualized Oncology Nurse Practitioner Program;Comparative Program Evaluation between Korea and the United States (한국적 종양 전문간호사 교육과정의 발전 전략;미국 교과 과정과의 비교분석)

  • Suh, Eun-Young
    • Asian Oncology Nursing
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    • v.6 no.2
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    • pp.93-103
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    • 2006
  • Purpose: With accumulated necessity to develop Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) in Korea, various types of Nurse Practitioner (NP) programs have been recently developed. Unlike the origin of the NP programs in the U.S., in which the lack of primary health care provider preceded the creation of NP education, NP programs in Korea are currently in an early stage in which the scope of practice and educational boundaries are still evolving. Just imitating American models may result in culturally inappropriate and practically non-feasible APN programs in Korea. This article was aimed to evaluate the top-ranked Oncology NP (ONP) programs in U.S. with those in Korea. Method: Using the Donabedian paradigm, the educational structure, process, and outcome were compared and contrasted between two countries. Results: The findings of this paper demonstrated that many aspects of structure of the Korean program are similar to those of the Americans with minor differences. Three strategies for future development of ONP program in Korea are suggested. Conclusion: Practical and feasible scope of practice for ONP in Korea should be determined. It needs to embrace every aspects of cancer experience. Also, nursing-oriented and culturally competent practice needs to be identified and incorporated into the ONP practice.

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The Real Picture of the Care Costs Paid to Korean Oncology Advanced Practice Nurses (종양전문간호사 업무에 대한 수가 실태)

  • Kim, Dal-Sook;Kim, Soo-Hyun;Kim, Kwang-Sung;Jun, Myung-Hee;Kim, Jin-Hyun;Lee, Hyun-Joo
    • Asian Oncology Nursing
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    • v.11 no.2
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    • pp.155-162
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    • 2011
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the actual care costs paid to Korean Oncology Advanced Practice Nurses (KOAPN). Methods: We collected data using a group discussion and questionnaire identified 115 tasks from job descriptions developed by the Korean Accreditation Board of Nursing. Forty-two KOAPN working at three university hospitals in Seoul were asked to evaluate each task as to type and whether the cost is paid or not. They were also asked to indicate the tasks in urgent need of development of a care cost with high priority. Results: Only five tasks (4.3%) related to treatment and complication related interventions or education were paid, and they were paid only once during the entire treatment period and were not covered by national health insurance. It was approved as a medical fee by health insurance review & assessment service. Furthermore, the names of the authority (doctor) and the actual provider (nurse) of the prescriptions were different for three of those tasks. Most of the suggested tasks needing development of care costs were actions specifically performed by nurses (physical-psychosocial-spiritual assessment, independent nursing interventions). Conclusion: KOAPN are currently paid for few tasks. To maximize the utilization of KOAPN, the establishment of a clear rational payment system directly related to their actual activities is needed.

A Study for Curriculum Development for Advanced Nurse Practitioner Program (전문간호사 양성을 위한 간호대학원 교과과정 및 운영방안 개발)

  • 조원정;이태화;김소야자;장순복;이원희;김광숙
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing
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    • v.32 no.6
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    • pp.917-928
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    • 2002
  • The traditional nursing roles have become increasingly blurred. Nurses are now working in different ways and at higher levels of practice that enable nurses to adapt their roles and take on new responsibilities. The advanced role of nurses requires a different kind of master-level prepared education. Method & Result: This article describes an curriculum development process in preparing registered nurses for their advanced nurese' roles in the area of acute adult health nursing, geriatric nursing, pediatric nursing, neonatal intensive care nursing and oncology nursing. Several important issues to be solved regarding introduction of APN were also discussed. Conclusion: The curriculum that was proposed in the study will equip nurses to meet the challenges of future healthcare provision and will be a model to other areas of nursing practice and curriculum development.