• Title, Summary, Keyword: Neck pain

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An Analysis of Various Factors Affecting Neck Pain and Dysfunction in Adults with Chronic Neck Pain Using Regression Analysis

  • Park, Seiyoun;Lee, Sangbin
    • Journal of International Academy of Physical Therapy Research
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    • v.10 no.4
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    • pp.1907-1913
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    • 2019
  • Background: The prevalence of neck pain and neck dysfunction is high in general population. However, there is little literature on the relationship and factors affecting neck pain and neck dysfunction. Objective: To investigate the correlation between neck and shoulder pain, headaches, neck and shoulder dysfunction, and sleep quality in adults with chronic neck pain, and factors affecting neck pain and neck dysfunction. Design: Cross-sectional study Methods : The sample included 114 subjects, who had complained of chronic neck pain for more 12 weeks. We conducted a Pearson's correlation between neck and shoulder pain, headaches, neck and shoulder dysfunction and sleep quality and a regression analysis of the related variables, thereby analyzing factors affecting neck pain and neck dysfunction. Results : In the present study, in adults with chronic neck pain, neck pain was positively correlated with the Neck Disability Index (NDI), Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI)-Pain score, and SPADI-Total score (p<.05). The NDI was positively correlated with neck pain, SPADI-Pain score, and SPADI-Total score, as well as with Pittsburgh Sleep Qulity Index(PSQI-K) (p<.05). Among the factors affecting neck pain, shoulder disability as assessed by the SPADI was a significantly associated with neck pain, while shoulder pain and shoulder disability determined by the SPADI were identified as significant variables among the factors affecting neck disability. Conclusion : These results indicated that as neck pain worsened, shoulder pain and neck and shoulder dysfunction also increased, which suggested that shoulder disability affected neck pain. In addition, as the neck dysfunction increased, neck pain and shoulder pain and shoulder dysfunction increased, and sleep quality deteriorated, which suggested that shoulder pain and shoulder disability affected neck disability.

Neck Pain and Functioning in Daily Activities Associated with Smartphone Usage

  • Lee, Hae-jung
    • The Journal of Korean Physical Therapy
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    • v.28 no.3
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    • pp.183-188
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    • 2016
  • Purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate neck posture, range of motion, muscle endurance and self-report of pain and disability in smartphone users. Methods: Seventy-eight university student volunteers, aged between 18 and 30 years (mean age 23.2), were assessed for: a head-neck posture by measuring cranial vertical angle, neck range of motions using cervical range of motion device, and a deep neck flexor endurance using a stabilizer. Finally, subjects were asked about their neck pain and completed disability questionnaires, ie, Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, Neck Disability Index, and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0. Results: Thirty-eight subjects experienced recurrent neck pain with/without upper limb pain (neck pain group) and 40 reported no current neck pain with/without upper limb pain (no neck pain group). Differences were found between groups on pain and disability questionnaires. Subjects with neck pain had significantly higher disability scores than those of no neck pain group. However, there were no differences observed between groups in a head-neck posture, neck range of motions, and deep neck muscle endurance time. The smartphone usage time was negatively correlated with neck pain intensity and disability score whereas it had positive relationship with flexibility and posture. Conclusion: Group differences were observed as lower capacity not only for neck specific daily activities but for general functioning in daily routine when the neck pain and no neck pain groups were compared. Therefore, functioning in daily activities should be investigated as prevention for further developing neck pain in smartphone users.

Relationship of neck disability index, shoulder pain and disability index, and visual analogue scale in individuals with chronic neck pain

  • Hwang, Sujin;Mun, Mee-Hyang
    • Physical Therapy Rehabilitation Science
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    • v.2 no.2
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    • pp.111-114
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    • 2013
  • Objective: Several muscles surrounding neck are vital not only for neck motion, but for upper extremities motions as well. Neck pain would affect neck and shoulder disability. The Neck Disability Index (NDI), Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) are increasingly used to evaluate treatment effectiveness after chronic neck pain. The purpose of this study was to analyze the correlation of neck pain, shoulder pain, and quality of life in patients with chronic neck pain. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Forty-three patients with neck pain participated in this study. Participants were instructed to place a mark on each item of three clinical measures that best represented their experience of his/her neck and shoulder problem over the last week. The outcome measures of the study were NDI, SPADI, and VAS for neck and shoulder pain and disability. Results: The NDI was significantly correlated with the VAS-Neck, SPADI-Pain, SPADI-Disability, SPADI-Total, and VAS-Shoulder (p<0.05). The VAS-Neck was significantly correlated with the VAS-Neck, SPADI-Pain, SPADI-Disability, SPADI-Total, and VAS-Shoulder (p<0.05). The SPADI-Total was significantly correlated with the NDI, VAS-Neck, SPADI-Pain, SPADI-Disability, and VAS-Shoulder (p<0.05). The SPADI-Pain was significantly correlated with the NDI, VAS-Neck, SPADI-Disability, SPADI-Total, and VAS-Shoulder (p<0.05). The SPADI-Disability was significantly correlated with the NDI, VAS-Neck, SPADI-Total, SPADI-Pain, and VAS-Shoulder (p<0.05). The VAS-Shoulder was significantly correlated with the NDI, VAS-Neck, SPADI-Pain, SPADI-Disability, and SPADI-Total (p<0.05). Conclusions: Neck disability in patients with chronic neck pain should be considered with disability and pain of the shoulder.

The Strength of the Lower Trapezius in Violinists With Unilateral Neck Pain

  • Kim, Si-Hyun;Park, Kyue-Nam
    • Physical Therapy Korea
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    • v.21 no.4
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    • pp.9-14
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    • 2014
  • Violinists tend to position the neck asymmetrically to hold the violin between the chin and the left shoulder. Asymmetrical neck posture may induce unilateral neck pain. Previous studies have suggested that individuals with unilateral neck pain exhibit reduced muscle strength of the lower trapezius, but no study has investigated violinists with unilateral neck pain. To this end, we recruited 18 violinists with unilateral neck pain for the present study in which the side on which neck pain was experienced, pain duration, and intensity were recorded. Lower trapezius strength was measured bilaterally in each subject using a handheld dynamometer. Significant differences in lower trapezius strength were evident between the ipsilateral and contralateral sides of neck pain (p<.05). No significant association between neck pain intensity or duration, and the extent of a deficit in lower trapezius strength, was evident (both p>.05). The association between the sides of weakened lower trapezius strength and neck pain was significant (p<.05). In conclusion, violinists with unilateral neck pain exhibited significantly less lower trapezius strength on the ipsilateral compared to the contralateral side of the pain. Unilateral neck pain more frequently involved the left side of the neck, which is used to stabilize the violin during playing. Thus, our study suggests that a possible relationship exists between muscle weakness in the lower trapezius and neck pain.

A Prospective Investigation into the Effects of Workplace Stress and Working Postures on Work-related Neck Pain in Office Workers (사무직 근로자들에게 나타나는 직업 관련 목 통증에 관한 직장 내 스트레스와 작업자세의 전향적 조사)

  • Jun, Deok-Hoon
    • PNF and Movement
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    • v.17 no.2
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    • pp.253-261
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    • 2019
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the causal relationship between workplace stress and working posture and the development of work-related neck pain in office workers. Methods: The study participants included 62 office workers who had not experienced neck pain in the previous 12 months. A battery of measures to evaluate potential workplace risk factors in an office setting were conducted at baseline, and the 12-month incidence of work-related neck pain was reported via monthly questionnaires. Survival analysis was used to evaluate the longitudinal relationship between the workplace risk factors and the development of work-related neck pain. Results: The incidence of work-related neck pain was 1.91 (95% CI: 1.06-3.45) per 100 person months. The incidence of neck pain was predicted to be less likely to happen when workers had a more upright thorax posture during computer work (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% CI: 0.89-0.99). However, stress may deteriorate the preventative effects of other risk factors on neck pain and showed a positive relationship with episodes of neck pain (hazard ratio, 1.37; 95% CI: 1.03-1.84). Conclusion: Understanding the psychophysiological effects of neck pain may explain the development of neck pain in office workers. Our interest in prevention plans and treatments should therefore involve a multifactorial pathology of neck pain in the workplace.

The Effect of Rectus Abdominis Functional Massage on Forward head posture and Pain in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain (복직근 기능적 마사지가 만성 목통증 환자의 머리전방자세와 통증에 미치는 영향)

  • Lee, Jae-nam;Jung, Sang-mo;Jeon, Jae-hyung
    • The Journal of Korean of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapy
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    • v.24 no.1
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    • pp.15-21
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    • 2018
  • Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of cervical deep muscle flexion exercise (CCFE) on craniovertebral angle, pain, and neck disability for patients with chronic neck pain Methods: The subjects of this study were randomly divided into three groups of 30 patients with chronic neck pain: rectus abodominis functional massage (n=10), cervical deep muscle flexion exercises group (n=10), and the control group(n=10). To assess visual analog scale (VAS) was used to test the neck pain, To assess neck posture was used to craniovertebral angle, VAS was used to test the neck pain, neck disability index (NDI) was used to test the neck dysfunction. All measurements were performed before and after each intervention was applied 3 times a week for 4 weeks. Results: In the results of all measurements, 2 groups except for the control group showed a significant change in the recovery of posture, neck pain, neck disability index (p<.05). Conclusions: Our results of this study showed that applying cervical deep muscle flexion exercise and rectus abodominis functional massage to patients with chronic neck pain improved cervical posture, neck pain, neck disability.

Misconceived Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendinitis during Management of Myofascial Neck Pain Syndrome

  • Oh, Ji Youn;Lim, Jin Hun;Kim, Yong Seok;Kwon, Young Eun;Yu, Jae Yong;Lee, Jun Hak
    • The Korean Journal of Pain
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    • v.29 no.1
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    • pp.48-52
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    • 2016
  • Differential diagnosis of posterior neck pain is very challenging based on symptoms and physical examination only. Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is a rare and frequently misdiagnosed entity in various causes of neck pain. It results from calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscle which is characterized by severe neck pain, painful restriction of neck movement, dysphagia, and odynophagia. We herein report a case of a patient with acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis, who complained of posterior neck pain, initially diagnosed and treated as a myofascial neck pain syndrome.

Altered Motor Control in Patients With Neck Pain and Prospective Research Work (경부통증 환자의 변형된 운동조절 특성 분석과 향후 활용 방안)

  • Lee, Min-young;Yoon, Bum-chul
    • Physical Therapy Korea
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    • v.23 no.2
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    • pp.20-34
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    • 2016
  • Background: It is necessary to find and develop the effective way of intervention for patients with neck pain, since the neck pain is becoming increasingly common throughout the world. To identify the altered motor control in patient with neck pain would be informative to find and develop the effective way of intervention. Objects: The aim of this study was to review literature regarding the altered motor control in patients with neck pain, measured by using surface electromyography (sEMG), ultrasonography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and to suggest prospective research work on neck pain. Methods: Case-control (neck pain/healthy) studies published between 2004 and 2015 that investigated neck muscle activation, thickness, cross-sectional area, and fat infiltrate were searched in Scopus, PubMed, and ScienceDirect. Twenty-eight articles were included in this study. Results: sEMG, ultrasonography, and fMRI were used complementarily to investigate the altered superficial and deep neck muscle activation, thickness, cross-sectional area, and fat infiltrate in patients with neck pain. They showed the following altered motor control when compared retrospectively with healthy subjects or during specific functional tasks: (1) increased superficial muscle activation, (2) lesser deep muscle thickness, (3) smaller cross-sectional area of the deep muscle, and (4) greater fat infiltrate in deep muscles. In particular, among the women, the office workers showed higher muscle activation of superficial neck muscles during functional tasks, although they did not have neck pain, than those who were not office workers. Conclusion: Studies revealed that patients with neck pain showed an altered motor control when compared with healthy subjects by using various assessment modalities. Understanding this phenomenon would help researchers design an effective intervention for alleviating neck pain or to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. In addition, we recommend that female office workers take measures to care for their necks before developing neck pain.

A Longitudinal Investigation of the Moderating Effect of Social Support on Job Strain Developing Non-Specific Neck Pain in Office Workers

  • Jun, Deokhoon
    • The Journal of Korean Physical Therapy
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    • v.31 no.4
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    • pp.254-259
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    • 2019
  • Purpose: This study examined the interactions between the job strain and social support in the workplace on the development of workrelated neck pain in office workers. Methods: The participants included 62 office workers without neck pain over the last twelve months. A battery of measures evaluating the potential workplace risk factors in office settings were conducted at the baseline, and at the 12 month incidence of work-related neck pain was reported via monthly questionnaires. Survival analysis evaluated the interaction effect between job strain and social support on the development of work-related neck pain. Results: The incidence of work-related neck pain was 1.91 (95% CI: 1.06 - 3.45) per 100 person months. The interaction effect between job strain and social support found that job strain may increase the risk of developing new work-related neck pain when lower social support existed in the workplace. On the other hand, the adverse effects of job strain on the development of neck pain were not significant when workers had higher social support from their colleagues and supervisors. Conclusion: An investigation of the moderating effects of risk factors on neck pain might reveal the unexplained relationship between the risk factors for the development of neck pain in office workers. Therefore, the interest in prevention plans and treatments should involve a comprehensive understanding of the risk factors at workplace.

Prognostic Factor Analysis for Management of Chronic Neck Pain : Can We Predict the Severity of Neck Pain with Lateral Cervical Curvature?

  • Seong, Han Yu;Lee, Moon Kyu;Jeon, Sang Ryong;Roh, Sung Woo;Rhim, Seung Chul;Park, Jin Hoon
    • Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society
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    • v.60 no.4
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    • pp.456-464
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    • 2017
  • Objective : Although little is known about its origins, neck pain may be related to several associated anatomical pathologies. We aimed to characterize the incidence and features of chronic neck pain and analyze the relationship between neck pain severity and its affecting factors. Methods : Between March 2012 and July 2013, we studied 216 patients with chronic neck pain. Initially, combined tramadol (37.5 mg) plus acetaminophen (325 mg) was administered orally twice daily (b.i.d.) to all patients over a 2-week period. After two weeks, patients were evaluated for neck pain during an outpatient clinic visit. If the numeric rating scale of the patient had not decreased to 5 or lower, a cervical medial branch block (MBB) was recommended after double-dosed previous medication trial. We classified all patients into two groups (mild vs. severe neck pain group), based on medication efficacy. Logistic regression tests were used to evaluate the factors associated with neck pain severity. Results : A total of 198 patients were included in the analyses, due to follow-up loss in 18 patients. While medication was successful in reducing pain in 68.2% patients with chronic neck pain, the remaining patients required cervical MBB. Lateral cervical curvature, such as a straight or sigmoid type curve, was found to be significantly associated with the severity of neck pain. Conclusion : We managed chronic neck pain with a simple pharmacological management protocol followed by MBB. We should keep in mind that it may be difficult to manage the patient with straight or sigmoid lateral curvature only with oral medication.