• Title, Summary, Keyword: Microencapsulation

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Volatile Changes in Beverages and Encapsulated Powders Containing an Artemisia Extract during Production and Storage (쑥 추출물 함유 음료와 미세캡슐의 제조 및 저장 중 휘발성분 변화)

  • Park, Min-Hee;Kim, Mi-Ja;Cho, Wan-Il;Chang, Pahn-Shick;Lee, Jae-Hwan
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
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    • v.43 no.3
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    • pp.271-276
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    • 2011
  • Volatile profiles of beverages and encapsulated powders containing Artemisia princeps Pampan extracts were analyzed by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry during production and storage. Beverages containing 0.32 and 0.64% extracts were stored at room temperature for 8 weeks and $60^{\circ}C$ for 8 days, respectively. Encapsulated particles were stored at room temperature and $60^{\circ}C$ for 8 days. Total volatiles in beverages decreased significantly during storage, irrespective of storage condition (p<0.05). Terpenoids, including cymene, thujone, and ${\beta}$-myrcene, were major volatiles in beverages, and some volatiles including ethylfuran, vinylfuran, and 2-fufural increased in 60oC samples only. Total volatiles in microcapsules at room temperature were not significant different for 8 days (p>0.05), whereas those at $60^{\circ}C$ increased by 16.5 times. Limonene was the most detected volatile in microcapsules, and aldehydes such as hexanal, pentanal, and octanal, and furans such as 2-butylfuran and 2-pentylfuran increased in the $60^{\circ}C$ samples, which may have originated from oxidized lipids used in the microcapsules.

Low-Temperature Microencapsulation of Sesame Oil Using Fluidized Bed Granulation (Fluidized bed granulation을 이용한 참기름의 저온 미세캡슐화)

  • Jeong, Chan-Min;Lee, Min-Kyung;Lee, Hyun-Ah;Park, Ji-Yong
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
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    • v.41 no.1
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    • pp.27-31
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    • 2009
  • Top spray-drying method is frequently utilized for flavor encapsulation, but the top spray-dried products frequently suffer from high losses of volatile flavor as the result of a high processing temperature (150-$300^{\circ}C$). In an effort to solve these problems, a low-temperature fluidized-bed granulating method was utilized to encapsulate the flavor. For the encapsulation of sesame oil, oil-in-water emulsions of sesame oil and a mixture of maltodextrin, modified starch, gum arabic, and gellan gum were bottom-sprayed at milder temperatures (70-$100^{\circ}C$) using a fluidized-bed granulator. Sesame oil extracts from microcapsules were obtained via a simultaneous distillation/extraction technique, and the retention of volatile flavor compounds was analyzed via a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The retention of volatile flavors of sesame oil per se, spray-dried and fluidized-bed granulated microcapsules after 3-day-storage at $37^{\circ}C$ were 0.8%, 37.2%, and 42.0%, respectively. In addition, the low-temperature fluidized-bed granulation showed higher encapsulation yield and sensory preferences for the application of commercial products (beef rice porridge), as compared to spray drying.

Bifidogenic Effects of Inuloprebiotics in Broiler Chickens (이눌로프리바이오틱스의 브로일러에 대한 비피더스균 활성 효과)

  • Park, Byung-Sung
    • Journal of Life Science
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    • v.18 no.12
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    • pp.1693-1699
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    • 2008
  • Recent studies have suggested that inulin might be utilized as a prebiotics for the promotion of antimicrobial growth, but a major obstacle to the use of inulin has been its low bifidogenic effects, which were initially observed in the ceca of broiler chickens. Inulin has some problems with related to denaturation in air and lowering passage rate from upper digestive tract to caecum. To solve this problems, a newly developed compound derived by microencapsulation, inuloprebiotics, was hypothesized to enrich cecal bifidobacterial populations and reduce the colonization levels of Salmonella in the ceca of broiler chickens. The in vitro growth of intestinal beneficial bacteria including Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Lactobacillus casei grew effectively on the medium containing inulin, whereas the growth of Streptococcus aureus and Clostridium perfringens was not differences among the treatment groups. Broiler chickens consumed chow diets containing 0.5%, 0.7% or 1.0% inuloprebiotics, or a control diet without inuloprebiotics supplementation. The chickens on the inuloprebioticssupplemented diets evidenced significantly higher cecal levels of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus species as compared with the chickens on the control diet. The population of cecal E. coli and Salmonella was specifically reduced as the result of treatment with inuloprebiotics. However, we noted no significant differences in Bifidobacterium species, E. coli and Salmonella counts among the inuloprebiotics treatment groups. The inuloprebiotics-supplemented diets induced an increase in the serum IgG concentration. The thymus index was significantly increased in the broiler chickens that consumed diets containing 0.7% or 1.0% inuloprebiotics, with the exception of the chickens consuming the diet supplemented with 0.5% inuloprebiotics. These results indicate that the inuloprebiotic preparations exerted an immune system-promoting effect or selectively enriched the cecal Bifidobacterium species populations in the broiler chickens, and also suggest that inuloprebiotics may prove useful as a stable natural antimicrobial agent.

Potentials of Synbiotics for Pediatric Nutrition and Baby Food Applications: A Review (소아 영양 및 유아식 응용을 위한 신바이오틱스의 잠재력: 총설)

  • Jung, Hoo Kil;Kim, Sun Jin;Seok, Min Jeong;Cha, Hyun Ah;Yoon, Seul Ki;Lee, Nah Hyun;Kang, Kyung Jin
    • Journal of Dairy Science and Biotechnology
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    • v.33 no.2
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    • pp.111-118
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    • 2015
  • Probiotic, prebiotic, and synbiotic substances as well as microorganisms were added to infant formula in an attempt to influence the intestinal microflora with an aim to stimulate the growth of lactic acid bacteria, especially bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. Over the last 10 years, new synbiotic infant formulas containing probiotics and prebiotics have been proposed in order to simulate the effect of breast-feeding on the intestinal microflora. Owing to their synergistic effect, the new synbiotics are expected to be more helpful than using probiotics and prebiotics individually. Maintenance of the viability of the probiotics during food processing and the passage through the gastrointestinal tract should be the most important consideration, since a sufficient number of bacteria ($10^8cfu/g$) should reach the intended location to have a positive effect on the host. Storage conditions and the processing technology used for the manufacture of products such as infant formula adversely affect the viability of the probiotics. When an appropriate and cost-effective microencapsulation methodology using the generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status and substances with high biological value are developed, the quality of infant formulas would improve. The effect of probiotics may be called a double-effect, where one is an immunomodulatory effect, induced by live probiotics that advantageously alter the gastrointestinal microflora, and the other comprises anti-inflammatory responses elicited by dead cells. At present, a new terminology is required to define the dead microorganisms or crude microbial fractions that positively affect health. The term "paraprobiotics" (or ghost probiotics) has been proposed to define dead microbial cells (not damaged or broken) or crude cell extracts (i.e., cell extracts with complex chemical composition) that are beneficial to humans and animals when a sufficient amount is orally or topically administered. The fecal microflora of bottle-fed infants is altered when the milk-based infant formula is supplemented with probiotics or prebiotics. Thus, by increasing the proportion of beneficial bacteria such as bifidobacteria and lactobacilli, prebiotics modify the fecal microbial composition and accordingly regulate the activity of the immune system. Therefore, considerable attention has been focused on the improvement of infant formula quality such that its beneficial effects are comparable to those of human milk, using prebiotics such as inulin and oligosaccharides and potential specific probiotics such as bifidobacteria, which selectively stimulate the proliferation of beneficial bacteria in the microflora and the indigenous intestinal metabolic activity of the microflora.

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