• Title, Summary, Keyword: Medical humanities

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Two Aims of Medical Humanities Education: Good Doctors and Happy Doctors (인문사회의학 교육의 두 목표: 좋은 의사, 행복한 의사)

  • You, Hojong
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.17 no.2
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    • pp.51-56
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    • 2015
  • Recently, medical humanities education has begun to take up an increased proportion of the Korean medical curriculum. Many people now agree that not only basic medicine and clinical medicine but also medical humanities is needed in medical education. The aims of medical humanities education should dawn now. 'Medical humanities' can be roughly defined as "the interdisciplinary study and activity at the intersection of the humanities, social science, arts, and medicine." People tend to assume that the aim of medical humanities education is to produce good doctors, that is, physicians who contribute to society. Actually, cultivating good doctors is one of the proper aims of medical humanities education. In addition to it, another aim of medical humanities education should be cultivating happy doctors. Nowadays, many of Korea's physicians feel unhappy. In such a situation, medical humanities education should be aimed at developing happiness in medical trainees.

Suggestions for the Improvement of Medical Humanities Education (인문사회의학 교육과정 개선을 위한 제안)

  • Jeon, Wootaek
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.12 no.1
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    • pp.23-31
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    • 2010
  • Medical humanities has become a third area of medical education following basic and clinical medicine. Also, in the national evaluation of medical schools, medical humanities education is an important factor. However, there are many difficulties in teaching medical humanities in medical schools. First, it is still an unfamiliar education area to medical schools and professors. Second, still, there is no consensus on the definition and contents of this education. Third, it is usually very difficult to find professors who have interest and the ability to teach medical humanities. Fourth, even medical students do not understand why they should study medical humanities and sometimes do not eagerly participate in class. This paper suggests some solutions for these problems. First, medical humanities need to be divided into sections according to how easily the contents can be accepted by existing medical education system and apply these sections in the introduction of this education gradually and in stage. One example of the division can be as follows: Group 1) medical ethics and medical law which can be most easily accepted. Group 2) medical communication skills which can be relatively easily accepted. Group 3) medical history and medical professionalism which is relatively difficult to accept, and Group 4) medical philosophy, medicine and music, medicine and literature, medicine and art, medicine and religion, etc. which is the most difficult to accept. In this paper, four things are suggested. Second, divide the contents into mendatory courses and elective courses. Third, allocate the contents throughout the four years from the first year though the fourth year according to the spiral curriculum model. This paper reports some new ideas and methods for medical humanities education. First, to stimulate students' participation, several methods were applied in a large size lecture and student projects. Second, the emphasis of writing in class and evaluation were discussed. Third, the provision of hands on experience is more emphasized than lectures. Fourth, inviting some doctors who work in non-medical areas such as journalism, pharmaceutical industry, etc is suggested. Trial and error is inevitable in this education, but it is essential in molding a good doctor, so medical professors who are interested or in charge of this medical humanities education need to share their ideas and experiences.

Education of Medical humanities and Social Medicine in Schools of Korean Medicine in Korea (전국 한의과대학 및 한의학전문대학원의 인문사회의학교육 현황)

  • Cheon, Mog-Eun;Lim, Byung-Mook;Shin, Sang-Woo
    • Journal of Society of Preventive Korean Medicine
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    • v.16 no.1
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    • pp.31-42
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    • 2012
  • Objective : To set up the concept and the category of the medical humanities in Korean medicine education through researching and analysing the curriculum of 12 colleges and school of Korean medicine (KM) in Korea. Methods : We collected self-evaluation reports from 12 KM institutions, and analyzed subjects regarding medical humanities and social medicine. The subjects' relevance with medical humanities was verified using the learning objectives of KOMEEI(Korea Oriental Medicine Education and Evaluation Institute). The number of relevant subjects, the credits and educational hours, and the time of opening, etc. were analysed. Results : 12 KM institutions provide 44 subjects as medical humanities and social medicine related subjects. Among them, 17 subjects were corresponded to the actual learning objective of medical humanities. These subjects account for an average of 7% in total curriculum. Most of the subjects are required courses for premedical students and the fourth year students of medical school. Conclusions : This paper suggests the public discussion on the learning objective and the categories of the medical humanities education in KM institutions. Further studies on developing the educational contents and evaluation tools are also needed to produce good doctors with ability and personality.

A Case Study on Application of Flipped Learning in Medical Humanities: Focus on Instructional Design and Learners' Perspective (의료인문학 수업의 플립 러닝 적용 사례 연구: 수업설계와 학습자 인식을 중심으로)

  • Oh, Heejin
    • Journal of Science Education
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    • v.44 no.2
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    • pp.240-258
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    • 2020
  • The advances in science technology brought about a new form of learning called flipped-learning: a combination of on-line and off-line learning. A flipped learning is a form of blended learning which has become quite popular, nowadays, in the field of education. Despite the emphasis on the importance of medical humanities in medical education program, there are no effective teaching and learning models to realize the purpose of medical humanities education. This study explores the possibility of flipped-learning to apply medical humanities classes. The class was designed based on the ADDIE model consisting of five stages, analysis - design - development - execution - evaluation. In order to do 'flipped-learning,' the instructor reconstructs the purpose of medical humanities education, instructional purpose and content, and analyzed learner. The contents of the medical humanities class were structured considering the purpose of the introduction to the medical humanities in the medical education program and the competencies that medical personnel should have in the developed health care environment. The instructor produces a video of the lecture and makes it possible to use LMS (Learning Management System) before and after classes, and conducts discussion activities so that learner-learner and learner-teacher interaction could actively occur during the class. The result of applying medical humanities lesson as flipped learning is as follows: First, it can realize the essence of medical humanities education. Second, it contributes to strengthening the competencies of health care provider. Third, flip learning can be used as a new teaching strategy for medical humanities education. The result of this study is expected to suggest new ways of introduction to teaching method in the traditional medical humanities class and contribute to the practice of designing and doing flipped learning of medical humanities class in the future.

A Survey on the Introduction of Medical Humanities and Sociology into the National Medical Licensing Examination (인문사회의학의 의사국가시험 도입에 대한 인식도 조사)

  • Lee, Seunghee;Chung, Myung-Hyun;Shin, Jwa-Seop;Chung, Eun Kyung
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.12 no.1
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    • pp.33-41
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    • 2010
  • Purpose: This study aimed at investigating the current situation of Medical Humanities and Sociology-related-curriculum in Korean medical schools, and suggesting the courses of study for the contents and methods of the Medical Humanities and Sociology examination, which can be included in the National Examination for Medical Practitioners. Methods: We analyzed Medical Humanities and Sociology-related courses which are offered in Korean medical schools, and a survey was conducted by medical school professors and students and medical journalists. In the survey, the Medical Humanities and Sociology-related courses were divided into 8 parts, and the participants were asked to evaluate the importance of duty, necessity of education, necessity of evaluation and the evaluation method of each part using a seven-point scale. Results: A total of 207 medical school professors and students and 9 medical journalists participated in the survey. The results were similar for the importance of duty and necessity of education of each part, but those for the necessity of evaluation were different. - As a result, there seems to be a gap between the importance of duty and the importance of education of each course. Medical journalists and students group answered differently on the necessity of evaluation of each course was also reserved. Conclusion: It is necessarily recommended to include Medical Humanities and Sociology-related courses such as medical ethics, self-improvement and doctors' social responsibilities in the National Examination for Medical Practitioners.

History and Future of the Korean Medical Education System (우리나라 의사양성체제의 역사와 미래)

  • Ahn, Duck-Sun;Han, Hee-Jin
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.20 no.2
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    • pp.65-71
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    • 2018
  • Western medicine was first introduced to Korea by Christian missionaries and then by the Japanese in the late 19th century without its historical, philosophical, cultural, social, political, and economic values being communicated. Specifically, during the Japanese colonial era, only ideologically 'degenerated' medicine was taught to Koreans and the main orthodox stream of medicine was inaccessible. Hence, Korean medical education not only focuses on basic and clinical medicine, but also inherited hierarchical discrimination and structural violence. After Korea's liberation from Japan and the Korean war, the Korean medical education system was predominantly influenced by Americans and the Western medical education system was adopted by Korea beginning in the 1980s. During this time, ethical problems arose in Korean medical society and highlighted a need for medical humanities education to address them. For Korean medical students who are notably lacking humanistic and social culture, medical humanities education should be emphasized in the curriculum. In the Fourth Industrial Revolution, human physicians may only be distinguishable from robot physicians by ethical consciousness; consequentially, the Korean government should invest more of its public funds to develop and establish a medical humanities program in medical colleges. Such an improved medical education system in Korea is expected to foster talented physicians who are also respectable people.

The Development of a Theoretical Model of Integrated Medical Humanity Curriculum Using Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics Model (융합인재교육 이론모형 틀에 기반을 둔 통합의료인문학 교육과정 이론모형의 제안)

  • Kim, Jin Hee;Lee, Young Hwan;Park, Won Kyun;Park, Young Soon;Park, Hae Jin;Chun, Kyung Hee
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.17 no.1
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    • pp.39-48
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    • 2015
  • The purpose of this study was to propose a theoretical model for an integrated medical humanities curriculum based on a STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics) education framework and to provide a guideline for curriculum integration. Three dimensions of integrated curriculum development are competencies, core contents, and elements of integration. Competencies imply the purpose of the medical humanities of a medical school and the exit outcomes of the curriculum. Core contents imply the goals and objectives of the curriculum. We compared the goals and themes of the medical humanities with core attributes of professionalism. Four elements of integration were proposed: units (cases, problem activities, core contents, disciplines/subjects), types (multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary), contexts of integration (life cycle of patients, scope of society), and stages of student development (from student to doctor). It is expected that this theoretical model for an integrated medical humanities curriculum can be used as a guideline for curriculum development and an evaluation criterion for instructional designers and subject matter experts.

Students' Perspectives on Integrating a Social Service Program into a Medical Humanities and Social Science Curriculum (인문사회의학 교육과정에서 사회봉사체험실습 프로그램에 대한 학생 인식)

  • Kim, Pyeong Man;Kim, Soo Jung;Kang, Wha Sun
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.17 no.3
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    • pp.140-147
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    • 2015
  • Medical education can provide students with an opportunity to encounter marginalized communities and motivate them to become involved with the needs of disadvantaged people. The College of Medicine of The Catholic University of Korea includes a social service program in the medical humanities and social sciences curriculum. The course has lectures on social welfare, human rights, and social service, as well as four days of social service in 'Flower Village,' which is a Catholic social welfare institution. This study analyzes the satisfaction, feedback, and reflection papers of students who completed the social service program and provides an educational model for the medical humanities and social sciences. Students' satisfaction with the program was scored at 4.23 out of 5. A qualitative study of students' reflection papers derived 7 key phrases, among which 'nature and practice of social service,' 'holistic understanding of humans,' 'empathy and communication,' and 'social responsibility' are identified as goals of this program and 'happiness,' 'respect for human life,' and 'compassion' are good indicators of students' compassionate participation. Encounters with marginalized communities within the medical curriculum allows students to serve people with social difficulties and work for the improvement of their living conditions. Students learn to approach social needs with concern and empathy and seek ways to contribute to those communities.

Explanatory Study of Medical Students' Perception of Life Concept (의과대학생들의 생명 개념 인식에 관한 탐색적 연구)

  • Yoo, Hyo Hyun;Lee, Jun-Ki;Shin, Sein
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.19 no.1
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    • pp.36-46
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    • 2017
  • This study surveyed 506 medical students on their perception of life concept using an open-ended questionnaire. A constant comparative analysis of participants' written responses was conducted. The results revealed 3 main types and several sub-types of life concept. The main types included: humanities & sociology type, scientific type, and humanities sociology & science mixed type. The humanities & sociology type had 6 sub-types: religious values, ethical values, limited time, social characteristics, consciousness spirit soul, and mixed type. The scientific type had 4 sub-types as follows: respiration & metabolism, genetic & reproduction, homeostasis & emergent property, and mixed type. The most prevalent type was the perception that life concept, ethical values in humanities & sociology type. The understanding of the concept of life is essential to medical students' learning and improvement of professional competence. These results may suggest a meaningful direction for medical education regarding the concept of life.

Ajou University School of Medicine's Educational Approach to Cultivating Professionalism (아주대학교 의과대학 환자/의사/사회 과정을 통한 의학전문직업성 교육 경험)

  • Chae, Su Jin;Shin, Yun Mi;Hahm, Ki Hyun;Lim, Ki Young
    • Korean Medical Education Review
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    • v.14 no.1
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    • pp.19-24
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    • 2012
  • The purpose of this study was to observe how Ajou University School of Medicine runs its curriculum to cultivate professionalism. The paper also proposes a plan for the next step for the school. The Patient-Doctor-Society (PDS) course, begun in 2009, can be summarized by three characteristics. First, the PDS course is an integrated curriculum that is not a one-time program for a specific grade, but a continuous program open for all medical students. Second, the PDS course is designed following the philosophy and educational goals of the institution, and the curriculum assures maximum autonomy. Third, the PDS course is 'whole person education' that provides knowledge and teaches skills and an attitude. By analyzing the pros and cons of the program through annual evaluation, leaders of the program at Ajou will continue to consider what to teach and how to do so.