• Title, Summary, Keyword: Informational needs

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Informational Needs of Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy (항암화학요법 환자의 정보요구 분석)

  • Han, Kyung-Ja;Lee, Eun-Ok;Kim, Mae-Ja;Hah, Yang-Sook;Park, Young-Sook;Song, Mi-Soon;Chung, Chae-Weon;Park, Sung-Hee;Moon, Mi-Hye
    • Asian Oncology Nursing
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    • v.4 no.2
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    • pp.135-142
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    • 2004
  • Purpose: To examine informational needs of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was utilized. The sample was 198 cancer patients receiving chemotherapy for a diagnosis of stomach or lung cancer at a university hospital. A modified version of Toronto Informational Needs Questionnaire was applied. Results: Subjects reported highest informational needs in prognosis dimension, followed by the treatment dimension including side effects and alternative therapy. Information about medical tests and follow-up care after the treatment was also in great need. Dimensions of support for patients/family and sexuality were low in need. The degree of informational needs was negatively correlated with patient's age and number of children. Differences were found in informational needs according to the educational level employment status, and gender of the patients, while diagnosis and treatment options did not make differences in informational needs. Conclusion: Health care professionals need to perceive informational needs of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, and to provide them with information especially in the area of prognosis and treatment. Informational intervention would be effective when it is given with consideration of patient's characteristics.

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Activities of Daily Living and Nursing Needs of the Elderly in Nursing Home (요양시설 노인의 간호요구도 및 일상생활 수행능력)

  • Kim, Kwuy-Bun;Lee, Hye-Kyung;Sok, So-Hyune R.
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing
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    • v.20 no.1
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    • pp.1-11
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    • 2009
  • Purpose: The study was a survey study to identify the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and nursing needs of the elderly in the nursing home and derive the fundamental data for offering the better quality of nursing service to them. Methods: The subjects were the 111 elderly aged over sixty five living in the nursing home located in Seoul. Measures were the nursing needs scale and ADL scale. The data were analyzed by SAS 11.0. Results: First, with regard to the nursing needs, the general need was scored average 3.0, and the emotional' social need was 3.7, and the physical need was 3.1, and the informational need was 2.7. Second, the ADL was scored at the average of 2.7, bathing 1.9,. eating 3.1. Third, In correlation between the nursing needs by area, the informational nursing needs showed the sheer correlation with the physical nursing needs, emotional' social nursing needs. The physical nursing needs showed the sheer correlation with the informational. social nursing needs, and the inverse correlation with the ADL. Conclusion: It is necessary that it should improve the service to meet the emotional and social nursing needs and develop the extensive nursing programs satisfying their desires based on the general traits of the elderly.

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Informational Justice and Post-recovery Satisfaction in E-Commerce: The Role of Service Failure Severity on Behavioral Intentions

  • Kussusanti, Susanti;Tjiptoherijanto, Prijono;Halim, Rizal Edy;Furinto, Asnan
    • The Journal of Asian Finance, Economics and Business
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    • v.6 no.1
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    • pp.129-139
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    • 2019
  • The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of informational justice on post-recovery satisfaction, and the effect of post-recovery satisfaction on behavioral intentions in e-commerce, including further investigate the moderating effect of service failure severity. Using quantitative method, the population of this research are online customers in Indonesia, with non-probability sampling that will be done by purposive sampling method based on predetermined criterias, which are customers who were doing transactions in the Business to Consumer (B2C) online sites, experienced service failure in the last 6 months, submitted a complaint, and received a response. Sample of 317 online customers were gathered and analyzed using the Structural Equation Modeling. The results of this study indicated that 5 hypothesis are supported with data. As a conclusion, informational justice and post-recovery satisfaction has positive effect, while service failure severity acts as a moderator between post-recovery satisfaction and behavioral intentions. As a managerial implication, online store management needs to ensure the informational justice to make a post-recovery satisfaction. Therefore, online store management needs to ensure the informational justice to make a post-recovery satisfaction, increase repurchase and positive e-word of mouth intention, also work harder to recover services, especially in high service failure severity condition.

The Homecare Needs of Cancer Patients (암환자의 퇴원 후 가정간호 요구)

  • Kwon, In-Soo;Eun, Young
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing
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    • v.29 no.4
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    • pp.743-754
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    • 1999
  • The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify the homecare needs of patients with cancer and to provide a basis of interventions. One hundred and two patients at one general hospital in Gyeongnam responded to a questionnaire developed on the basis of care needs perceived by nurses caring for hospitalized patients with cancer. The questionnaire was a Likert type 5 point scale with 56 items on five need categories ; 1) informational 2) physical care : 3) emotional care 4) socioeconomic care and 5) special care needs. Internal consistency of this questionnaire was Cronbach's $\alpha$=.9101 for total items. The data was collected from March 1st to May 31th, 1998, by two graduate nurses. In the data analysis, mean & standard deviation were calculated to identify the degree of care need of each item, and the t-test & ANOVA were done to determine the effects of patients' demographic background on their care needs. The findings are summarized as follows ; 1) The mean score of total of need items was 3.048. Of the four need categories the highest score was informational at 3.4, followed by emotional care, 3.063, physical care, 2.623, and socioeconomic care, 2.599. 2) In the informational need category there were four subcategories with 19 items. Medication and pain control had the highest score, 3.755 ; second was diet and exercise, 3.613 ; third was disease and treatment process, 3.337 ; and last was personal hygiene and infection prevention at 2.687. 3) In the physical care need category there was nine items, IV infusion for nutrition and management of treatment complication was above 3.2 points and the remaining items were in the 2.847-2.070 score ranges. 4) In the emotional care need category there were seven items. The highest need was in support for relationships with health personnel, 3.673. The need for support of religions beliefs and support for having a religion were low at about 2 points. 5) In the socioeconomic care need category there were six items. Support for medical insurance expansion and financial support were above 3 points. Legal support and support for caring of children were low in the care needs. 6) In the special care need category the there were 15 items. Informational need about immunization and informational need about effects of disease on growth and development were high, above 4.1 points. Need for decubitus care and prevention, sitz bath and incontinence care were low, below 2 points. 7) There were significant differences in degree of care need according to admission rate, education level, marital status, religion and caregiver's religion. In conclusion, homecare needs perceived by hospitalized patient's with cancer was moderate, but informational need was higher than direct care need, leading to the conclusion that the provision of sufficient information to patients with cancer at discharge is needed. Nursing interventions should be developed considering the patient's background.

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Informational Needs of Postoperative Gastric Cancer Patients (위암 수술 후 환자의 정보 요구)

  • Kim, Ae-Ran;Choi, Min-Gew;Noh, Jae-Hyung;Sohn, Tae-Sung;Bae, Jae-Moon;Kim, Sung
    • Journal of Gastric Cancer
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    • v.9 no.3
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    • pp.117-127
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    • 2009
  • Purpose: Adequate health-related information provided by health professionals may help cancer patients overcome their uncertain situation and manage their healthcare. To provide information effectively, there is a need to understand the content of the patients' essential information. The purpose of this study was to identify recent informational needs of postoperative gastric cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from 190 postoperative gastric cancer patients who attended the Stomach Cancer Patients' Day ceremony (18 November 2008) held by the Stomach Cancer Center of Samsung Medical Center with the use of a questionnaire which measured informational needs. A questionnaire with 37 items was comprised of domains of diagnostic tests, cancer therapy, prognosis, follow-up, sexual activity, stomach cancer-related information, and 7 single items. Results: The priorities of informational needs were the domains of prognosis, ways of healthcare during treatment (a single item), follow-up, stomach cancer-related information, cancer therapy, and diagnostic tests (in descending order). Items related to prognosis, diet, and management of their healthcare ranked in the top 10 informational need scores. As age decreased, the degree of informational needs about diagnostic tests, cancer therapy, sexual activity, and stomach cancer-related information increased. Conclusion: We suggest that prognosis-related information based on the accumulated institutional therapeutic outcomes and objective prognosis data should be incorporated in the current education program. Health professionals should provide comprehensible information content to cancer patients and caregivers and encourage patients to participate in their therapy with a more positive attitude.

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Side Effects of Chemotherapy among Cancer Patients in a Malaysian General Hospital: Experiences, Perceptions and Informational Needs from Clinical Pharmacists

  • Chan, Huan-Keat;Ismail, Sabrina
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.13
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    • pp.5305-5309
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    • 2014
  • Background: This study aimed to assess the most common physical side effects experienced by local chemotherapy patients. Their perceptions of these side effects and informational needs from clinical pharmacists were also evaluated. Materials and Methods: This was a single-center, cross-sectional study. A face-to-face interview guided by a structured questionnaire with cancer patients admitted to receive repeated cycles of chemotherapy was conducted. Information collected included chemotherapy-related side effects after last chemotherapy experience, the most worrisome side effects, the side effects overlooked by healthcare professionals and the preferred method, amount and source of receiving related information. Results: Of 99 patients recruited, 90 participated in this survey (response rate: 90.9%). The majority were in the age range of 45-64 years (73.3%) and female (93.3%). Seventy-five (83.3%) and seventy-one (78.9%) experienced nausea and vomiting, respectively. Both symptoms were selected as two of the most worrisome side effects (16.7% vs. 33.3%). Other common and worrisome side effects were hair loss and loss of appetite. Symptoms caused by peripheral neuropathies were perceived as the major symptoms being overlooked (6.7%). Most patients demanded information about side effects (60.0%) and they would like to receive as much information as possible (86.7%). Oral conversation (83.3%) remained as the preferred method and the clinical pharmacist was preferred by 46.7% of patients as the educator in this aspect. Conclusions: The high prevalence of chemotherapy-related side effects among local patients is of concern. Findings of their perceptions and informational needs may serve as a valuable guide for clinical pharmacists to help in side effect management in Malaysia.

Information Needs on Patients with Cancer in Korea (암 환자의 정보요구 분석)

  • Kim, Gi-Yon;Hur, Hea-Kung
    • Korean Journal of Adult Nursing
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    • v.14 no.1
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    • pp.135-143
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    • 2002
  • Purpose: To explore what particular types of information were important to patients diagnosed with cancer. Methods: Seventy three patients with cancer at an outpatient clinic and hospitalized patients in W Christian Hospital Korea, responded. The structured questionnaire developed by the investigator based on previous studies. Results: There was a significant negative relationship between age and the score of informational need (r=-.307, p<.05). Level of education, and level of monthly income were related to level of informational need. The top three informational priorities according to the time since diagnosis were 'Self care during treatment', 'Health food and diet', 'Likelihood of recurrence', 'Follow up care' and 'Side effects'. The top three informational priorities for patients with breast cancer were 'Likelihood of recurrence', 'Metastasis possibility', 'Treatment options', and 'Side effects. For patients with stomach cancer, they were 'Follow up care', 'Healthy food and diet', 'Likelihood of recurrence', and 'Metastasis possibility', and for patients with colon/rectal cancer, they were 'Side effects', 'Healthy food and diet', 'Likelihood of recurrence', and 'Self care during treatment'. Conclusion: The assessment of information needs based on demographic factors and disease-related factors is critical in helping patients with cancer to manage their illness.

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Nurse의s Perception in the Homecare Needs of Cancer Patient (간호사가 지각한 암환자의 퇴원후 가정간호요구)

  • Kwon, In-Soo;Eun, Young
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing
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    • v.28 no.3
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    • pp.602-615
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    • 1998
  • The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify the homecare needs of the discharged patient with cancer as perceived by nurses caring hospitalized cancer patients. At two hospitals in Gyeongnam, 74 nurses responded to an open-ended questionnaire consisting of four need categories : 1) educational & informational need, 2) physical need, 3) emotional need, 4) social need. Respondents were asked to list above ten needs of cancer patient in each category. Two researchers analyzed the data by content analysis method. The findings are summarized as follows : 1) A total of 1,417 need items were generated by nurses. The largest number of needs were in the educational & informational need category(475 items, 36.3%). Physical(414 items, 31.6%), emotional (237 items, 18.1%) need were the second, third largest, and social(184 items, 14.0%) need made up the smallest category. 2) In the educational & informational need category, there were seven subcategories of prognosis, diet & exercise, medication & pain, wound care, folk remedy, personal hygiene, comfort. The need items related to prognosis of cancer accounted for almost a half(48.2%) of the total. 3) In the physical need category, there were ten subcategories of personal hygiene, skin & tissue, nutrition, side effect on treatment, exercise, pain, elimination, equipment, comfort & safety, others. The largest number of needs were in subcategory of the personal hygiene(82 items, 19.8%). 4) In the emotional need category, there were four subcategories of emotional support related to disease, emotional support related to routine life, spiritual support, maintenance of relationship with nurse & doctor. The largest number of needs were in subcatgory of the emotional support related to disease(96 items, 40.5%). 5) In the social need category, there were five subcategories of support for social life, household management, legal support, the use of volunteer service, financial support. The largest number of needs were in support for social life subcategory(58 items, 31.5%).

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A Comparison of Perceived Nursing Needs among Oncology Nurses, Patients with Non-terminal Cancer and Patients with Terminal Cancer (간호사, 비말기 암환자 및 말기 암환자가 지각한 간호요구의 중요도와 제공정도에 대한 비교)

  • Choi, Ja Yun
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing
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    • v.35 no.6
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    • pp.1135-1143
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    • 2005
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the perceived importance and the perceived caring of nursing needs among oncology nurses, patients with non-terminal cancer and patients with terminal cancer. Method: A total of 83 oncology nurses, 56 patients with non-terminal cancer and 39 patients with terminal cancer served as subjects. Data was collected based on the 4-point Likert scale using a self-administered questionnaire from Mar. to Sept. 2004. Finally, data was analyzed using mean, SD, paired-test,. and ANOVA. Results: The score of the perceived importance of nursing needs was higher than that of the perceived performance of nursing needs in all three groups. There was also a difference in the degree of perceived performance of nursing needs among the three groups. In contrast, there was no difference in the total score of the perceived importance of nursing needs among the three groups, unlike the importance of informational and physical needs as a subgroup of perceived importance, where a difference was noted. Conclusions: Strategies should be developed to narrow down these gaps between nurses and patients. In particular, informational and educational programs should be designed for patients with terminal cancer.

Informational Needs of Women with Breast Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy

  • Abi Nader, Elie;Kourie, Hampig Raphael;Ghosn, Marwan;El Karak, Fadi;Kattan, Joseph;Chahine, Georges;Nasr, Fadi
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.4
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    • pp.1797-1800
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    • 2016
  • Background: Research in the field of informational needs of breast cancer patients is scarce. In the few published articles, these needs were usually not satisfied. The main objective of this study was to evaluate satisfaction regarding informational needs in women with breast cancer. The long-term goal was to guide physician-patient communication to meet these needs. Materials and Methods: A survey with 21 questions was completed by 84 female patients receiving chemotherapy in a one-day hospital in Beirut, Lebanon. All patients were aware of their disease and agreed to participate in the survey. Results: The doctor was the major source of information for patients followed by media (radio and television). The level of knowledge of patients concerning their disease was proportional to the number of information sources. Women aged younger than 45 years, diagnosed during the last three months before the survey and certified from high school were less satisfied with information given by the oncologist. The missing information was in relation with the steps of the treatment after the chemotherapy regimen, the risk of a family member (sisters and daughters) of developing the disease and management of lymphedema. Conclusions: This study generated a scale for the degree of satisfaction of information received by women with breast cancer from their oncologist. The physician can use this scale to improve his or her skills of communication to patients and diminish their level of fear and anxiety.