• Title, Summary, Keyword: East Asia

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Guest Editorial The Third Round of Migrant Incorporation in East Asia: An Introduction to the Special Issue on Friends and Foes of Multicultural East Asia

  • Asahina, Yuki;Higuchi, Naoto
    • Journal of Contemporary Eastern Asia
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    • v.19 no.2
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    • pp.1-19
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    • 2020
  • Trends toward an influx of new migrants have been pronounced in East Asia through a development we call the third round of migrant incorporation. At the same time, other features of East Asian societies, such as strong levels of ethnic nationalism, have changed little, posing challenges to multiculturalism. In this introduction to this special issue, we review the latest research trends broadly concerning multiculturalism, migrant groups that have received little attention, racism and xenophobia. We first discuss the state of migrant incorporation in East Asia and the limits of multiculturalism in this region, where various features of the developmental state persist. We then introduce research on voices opposing multiculturalism in East Asia. This introduction highlights what is peculiar―and ordinary―about migrant incorporation and the associated challenges in East Asia.

The Comparative Advantage of Intermediate Goods Trade in East Asia and Free Trade Agreement (동아시아 국가 간 부품무역 비교우위와 자유무역협정)

  • Kwon, Taek-Ho;Joo, Kyeong-won
    • Korea Trade Review
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    • v.41 no.1
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    • pp.159-186
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    • 2016
  • This study analyzes the degree of dependency and comparative advantage of each country for intermediate goods trade in East Asia, which predicts the comparative advantage of the intermediate goods trade and fragmentation in East Asia when the FTA arrangement in East Asia is implemented. The results are as follows. First, the share of intra-regional trade in the intermediate goods in East Asia has increased over time, implying the deepening of interdependency in intermediate goods trade within the East Asia. Second, Korea is a net exporter in intermediate goods trade for China and ASEAN, whereas it is a net importer for Japan. Japan is a high net exporter for all East Asia, while China is a net importer for Korea, Japan and ASEAN. If FTA arrangement in East Asia is implemented, Japan and Korea will be key suppliers of the intermediate goods for East Asia, while China and ASEAN will play a role of the manufacturing factory through the import of intermediate goods. Third, Korea has a comparative advantage in intermediate trade of electric and electronics and transport vehicle industry in East Asia. Japan has a comparative advantage in all of electric and electronics, transport vehicle, precision instrument, general machinery industry, whereas China has a comparative advantage only in electric and electronics intermediate trade in East Asia. The intra-industry trade of the intermediate goods in precision instrument, general machinery industry is expected to grow among Korea, Japan and China.

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Reorienting Reorient : East Asia and 15th-19th Century Joseon

  • Kang, Sung-Ho
    • Asian review of World Histories
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    • v.2 no.2
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    • pp.197-216
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    • 2014
  • This paper examines A. G. Frank's views about 15th-19th Korea (Joseon Dynasty) in his Reorient. A. G. Frank recognized that Korea might have played a great role in the international relations of East Asia, but he did not write systematically about it and he did not treat Korea as an independent player in the history of East Asia. I think the greatest limitation to his re-interpretation of East Asia is in that he depends too much on China's and Japan's perspective. In order to overcome Frank's shortcomings regarding the history of Korea, first I examine what Frank recognized about the Joseon dynasty between 1400 and 1800. Next I compare Joseon's development to that of China and Japan between 1400 and 1800. Frank compared Europe and East Asia (mainly China and Japan) from three aspects of quantities (population, production, productivity, and trade), qualities (science and technology), and mechanism (economic and financial institutions). With this research we insist that Joseon should not be dismissed in 15th-19th East Asia. The reasons are as follows. First, Joseon between 1400 and 1800 had developed economically as much as China and Japan. Second, Joseon had played a great role in connecting China and Japan and had a positive influence on the development of Japan. So we need to reappraise Reorient's view about East Asia. Only when role of Joseon can be correctly estimated, the dynamics and diversity of East Asia can be properly understood.

Cancer Control Programs in East Asia: Evidence From the International Literature

  • Moore, Malcolm A.
    • Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
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    • v.47 no.4
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    • pp.183-200
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    • 2014
  • Cancer is a major cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world, including the countries of North-East and South-East Asia. Assessment of burden through cancer registration, determination of risk and protective factors, early detection and screening, clinical practice, interventions for example in vaccination, tobacco cessation efforts and palliative care all should be included in comprehensive cancer control programs. The degree to which this is possible naturally depends on the resources available at local, national and international levels. The present review concerns elements of cancer control programs established in China, Taiwan, Korea, and Japan in North-East Asia, Viet Nam, Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia as representative larger countries of South-East Asia for comparison, using the published literature as a guide. While major advances have been made, there are still areas which need more attention, especially in South-East Asia, and international cooperation is essential if standard guidelines are to be generated to allow effective cancer control efforts throughout the Far East.

EAST ASIA VLBI CONSORTIUM AND ITS COMMITTEE

  • INOUE MAKOTO
    • Journal of The Korean Astronomical Society
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    • v.38 no.2
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    • pp.77-79
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    • 2005
  • We had the first committee meeting of the East Asia VLBI Consortium during the EAMA6 meeting held in Seoul. A VLBI network composed of telescopes in the East Asia region could provide extreme properties, and the coordination of them has been expected. The Committee of the East Asia VLBI Consortium is a standing committee to promote activities of the consortium, in which participating countries at present are China, Japan, and Korea over eight institutes/observatories. Here we introduce the Consortium and Committee.

Impact of Sudden Stratospheric Warming on the Surface Air Temperature in East Asia (성층권 돌연승온이 동아시아 지표기온에 미치는 영향)

  • Song, Kanghyun;Son, Seok-Woo;Woo, Sung-Ho
    • Atmosphere
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    • v.25 no.3
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    • pp.461-472
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    • 2015
  • The sudden stratospheric warming (SSW), which is characterized by an abrupt increase of polar stratospheric temperature by several tens of degrees in a week, has been known to affect tropospheric weather and climate on sub-seasonal time scale in the boreal winter. Such downward coupling has been often examined in North Atlantic and Europe, but rarely examined in East Asia. In this study, by applying the two definitions of SSW to the reanalysis data, the possible impacts of the SSW events on the surface air temperature (SAT) and tropospheric circulation in East Asia are analyzed. It is found that Eurasian continent, including Siberia and the Northeast Asia, tends to experience anomalously cold SAT for up to sixty days after the SSW events. The resulting SAT anomalies largely resemble those associated with negative Artic Oscillation. However, over East Asia, SSW-related SAT change is weak and not statistically significant. Only during the extreme SSW events when the downward coupling between the stratosphere and troposphere is strong, East Asia exhibits significantly cold SAT anomalies. This relationship is presented by grouping SSW events into those followed by cold SAT anomalies over East Asia and those by warm anomalies for varying threshold values of the SSW events.

Global Value Chain in East Asia Under "New Normal": Ideology- Technology-Institution Nexus

  • Choi, Byung-il
    • East Asian Economic Review
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    • v.24 no.1
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    • pp.3-30
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    • 2020
  • This paper analyzes how the current Global Value Chain (GVC) of East Asia has been established, and attempts to project the future trajectory of GVC under New Normal in the global trading system. For this purpose, the framework of Ideology-Technology-Institution nexus is presented with focus on the dynamics of interplay between ideology and technology, duly recognizing the dual-aspect of technology- a platform for business and also for national defense. The paper analyzes how the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) of the 1990s played a role of "facilitator" in shaping the GVC of East Asia, where China plays 'factory for final assembly' and the US plays 'the largest consumer'. Under New Normal, digital technology is likely to play the opposite role of "disrupting" the GVC of East Asia, unlike ICT. The paper explores the mechanism behind this great disruption. What is driving New Normal is the US-China power competition, seeking for dominance in East Asia and beyond. This paper argues that New Normal is not temporary shock, but will last for some time. Under this presumption, the paper presents three scenarios for the future trajectory of GVC in East Asia.

Future Climate Projection over East Asia Using ECHO-G/S (ECHO-G/S를 활용한 미래 동아시아 기후 전망)

  • Cha, Yu-Mi;Lee, Hyo-Shin;Moon, JaYeon;Kwon, Won-Tae;Boo, Kyong-On
    • Atmosphere
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    • v.17 no.1
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    • pp.55-68
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    • 2007
  • Future climate changes over East Asia are projected by anthropogenic forcing of greenhouse gases and aerosols using ECHO-G/S (ECHAM4/HOPE-G). Climate simulation in the 21st century is conducted with three standard SRES scenarios (A1B, B1, and A2) and the model performance is assessed by the 20th Century (20C3M) experiment. From the present climate simulation (20C3M), the model reproduced reliable climate state in the most fields, however, cold bias in temperature and dry bias of summer in precipitation occurred. The intercomparison among models using Taylor diagram indicates that ECHO-G/S exhibits smaller mean bias and higher pattern correlation than other nine AOGCMs. Based on SRES scenarios, East Asia will experience warmer and wetter climate in the coming 21st century. Changes of geographical patterns from the present to the future are considerably similar through all the scenarios except for the magnitude difference. The temperature in winter and precipitation in summer show remarkable increase. In spite of the large uncertainty in simulating precipitation by regional scale, we found that the summer (winter) precipitation at eastern coast (north of $40^{\circ}N$) of East Asia has significantly increased. In the 21st century, the warming over the continents of East Asia showed much more increase than that over the ocean. Hence, more enhanced (weakened) land-sea thermal contrast over East Asia in summer (winter) will cause strong (weak) monsoon. In summer, the low pressure located in East Asia becomes deeper and the moisture from the south or southeast is transported more into the land. These result in increasing precipitation amount over East Asia, especially at the coastal region. In winter, the increase (decrease) of precipitation is accompanied by strengthening (weakening) of baroclinicity over the land (sea) of East Asia.

A Comparative Study on the Upper Garment in the Ancient East and West (고대(古代) 동서양(東西洋) 상의(上衣) 비교연구(比較硏究))

  • Yu, Song-Ok
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Costume
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    • v.3
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    • pp.29-46
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    • 1980
  • The purpose of this thesis is to find out how the upper garment styles in the Ancient East and est had been influenced with each other. Analytical studies conclude the fellowing findings: 1) Upper garment styles in the feat Asia and the Egypt already highly developed in 28th century B.C. and show us the original style of the wrap-over to the left and that of the round neckline(曲領). Upper garment of the open in the center front shown in Babylonia in 18th century B.C. had been inherited to the caftan of the Hebrew and later succeeded to the Persia. 2) The tunic styles of the round neckline, the wrap-over to the left and the open in the cotter front, which were the basic styles of the upper garment, had teen widely accepted to the central Asia and the East Asia, as well as the Northern Europe, from the West Asia. 3) The styles of the wrap-over to the right originated from China since it had begun to show in the Shang Dynasty(商代, 殷代). 4) The East and the West costumes had been very much intermixed in 4th century B.C. Alexander the Great of Macedoria in 4th century B.C. expanded his territory to the central Asia and built up the Bacteria, when the most western civilization had been greatly transmitted to the Orient. Meanwhile the tunic being clad in the West and Central Asia began to be worn by soldiers in the period of the Warring States in China (326-299 B.C.) and afterwards worn even by civil officials since the age of the T'ang Dynasty of China. 5) The Upper garments of the open in the center front, the wrap-over to the right, the wrap-over to the left and the round neckline were found in Korea, which mean that the upper garment styles in the Ancient Korea were intermixed of the factors from the West Asia, the central Asia and the East Asia. 6) The styles of costume in the East Asia were influenced by the West Asia through the central Asia. The upper garment styles Europe were also influenced by the West Asia. Thus the upper garment styles in the Ancient East and West had been mutually affected with each other.

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China: in the East Asia Financial Crisis

  • Peng Yun-E
    • Proceedings of the KOR-KST Conference
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    • pp.204-211
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    • 1998
  • This paper reviewed the East Asia financial crisis, how China reacts to its impact, and what lessons should be learned from the crisis.

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