• Title, Summary, Keyword: Cultural anthropology

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Building up an academic discipline on material assemblages: modern Europe's museum developments and 'museology'

  • Kim, Seong Eun
    • Cross-Cultural Studies
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    • v.36
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    • pp.61-95
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    • 2014
  • At the turn of the century in which European colonialism was reaching its zenith and modernization was gathering speed, public museums were institutionalized. This paper looks into the part these European modern museums played in territorializing academic disciplines like anthropology and art history. The museums to deal with are the British Museum and the National Gallery in London, Mus?e du Louvre in Paris, and Museumsinsel in Berlin. Rather than in-depth detailed analysis of each museum, the aim is to explore the ways in which these museological institutions interacting with modern disciplines in the wider colonial context objectified other cultures and formulated a framework of the world through classification and comparison of material things, on the basis of the judgement of their artistic values. This exploration is also to rethink theoretical positions and perspectives on the museum in Korea. It is remarkable in Europe that such academic fields as history, art history, anthropology and cultural studies look for new possibilities of museology in conjunction with the recent proliferation of studies on the museum as a medium to construct and deconstruct knowledge. Meanwhile, the mammoth European museums which are often considered a stronghold of museology advocate the 'universal museum' themselves, quite the modern idea but in a revised rendering. Under these circumstances, this paper seeks to shed light on the definition of the museum as an arena in which scholarly discourses about art, culture and history can be created and contested, on the effectiveness of the museum as a communication medium in a postcolonial era, and on the need to pay trans-disciplinary attention to the museum in its broadest sense.

Cultural syndromes in Koreans and others - a medical anthropology in search for resolution and prevention

  • Lee, Sok Kyu
    • The Journal of Medicine and Life Science
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    • v.16 no.3
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    • pp.76-79
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    • 2019
  • Korean Physicians encounter often the patients with cultural syndromes. This paper surveys those cultural syndromes in Korea, contrasted with those in other countries in five different domains; socio-cultural, sexual, psychological, psychosomatic and religio-spiritual. I discovered three natural consequences if not intervened; 1) healed and readjusted, 2) paradigmatically shifted for the better results and 3) mal-adjustment for the worse. In the hope to let the culture shifted toward better one, I propose to allow our Koreans to be educated, inspired by Park Wansoe's novel; 'Dreaming in an Incubator(꿈꾸는 인큐베이터)'.

T. S. Eliot's Modernized Myth (엘리엇의 현대화된 신화)

  • Kweon, Seunghyeok
    • English & American cultural studies
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    • v.9 no.1
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    • pp.1-25
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    • 2009
  • This paper attempts to illuminate the significance of the myth or mythical method used in The Waste Land, which Eliot adapted from Jessie L. Weston's From Rituals to Romance and Sir James Frazer's Golden Bough. While he was composing a modern epic, James Joyce's Ulysses and Igor Stravinsky's Le Sacre du Printemps made him sure that the mythical method would be the best way to make the non-relational and chaotic modern world into a work of art. Although he accepted F. H. Bradley's epistemology that one's actual experience is non-relational, he strongly put an emphasis on 'the unified sensibility' in John Donne's poetry with which a poet changes all the dissociated material into art. He also found another effective method to give the chaotic experiences an order, and to make them modern art: the mythical method in his contemporary anthropology. With the mythical method he incorporated the various barren, horrible and ugly aspects of modern world into a new unity in The Waste Land. In addition, he embraced his contemporary anthropological theory that a primitive life described in myths is a culture just different from modern culture, and heartily employed some aspects of primitive culture to make modern poetry as well as modern culture rich and exuberant.

The Clothing Life of Korean-Chinese in Yanbian Area (연변조선족의 의생활에 나타난 문화주변현상과 외래문화의 영향)

  • 정인희
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Costume
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    • v.28
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    • pp.85-98
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    • 1996
  • Yanbian is the area where many Korean-Chinese have settled and have undergone a unique culture. This study is intended to examine the clothing life of Korean-Chinese in Yanbian in the aspects of the cultural marginality and the effects of other cultures. Nowadays they have three kinds of dresses" Han-Bok In-Min-Bok and the western dress. han-Bok is the result of cultural marginal phenomenon so they pre-serve 1920s style which already disappeared in South Korea. In-Min-Bok is the production of Communism which is an 'invention' from the viewpoint of Cultural-Anthropology. However both Han-Bok and In-Min-Bok are gradually disappearing from the daily life. Today it is quite common for us to see a number of people wearing western dresses on the street. In their clothing life the acculturation to the Chinese wasn't traced which may be due to the strong 'National I dentity' of them.

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Research on Housing History of Multi-Discipline (주거사에 관한 제학문의 연구성과)

  • 김대년
    • Journal of the Korean housing association
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    • v.1 no.2
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    • pp.67-80
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    • 1990
  • This study aims to analyze the reserch result about housing history of multi-disciplines especially archeology, cultural anthropology, folklore, geography, archtecture and dwelling science. Each discipline has acted an important role to develop the research on housing history, even though they have some limitations. They usually failed in clarfying the relationship among physical housing, habitants and social environment. In order to overcome these limitations, this study suggests microsociological approach, so called "Housing Adjustment Model".del".uot;.

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Korean Immigrant Women's Meanings of Breast, Breast Cancer, and Breast Cancer Screenings

  • Suh Eun-Young Eunice
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing
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    • v.36 no.4
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    • pp.604-611
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    • 2006
  • Purpose. Koreans are one of the fastest growing Asian populations in the U.S. since 1960s. In Korean immigrant women (KIW), breast cancer was reported as the most frequently diagnosed cancer. However, their screening rates for breast cancer are lower than national guidelines; it is assumed that underlying cultural schemas of breast, breast cancer, and its screening modalities exist and need to be studied. This study was aimed to investigate cultural meanings of breast, breast cancer, and breast cancer screenings in KIW. Methods. Using cultural models theory from cognitive anthropology, naturalistic qualitative methodology was utilized. Three focus group interviews with fifteen KIW were conducted. Thematic analysis with constant comparison technique was performed eliciting units of meaning, categories, and themes. Results. The cultural schema of the meaning of breast is 'mother who is breast-feeding her baby,' with two themes of 'balance in size,' and 'shyness.' Regarding breast cancer, three themes, i.e., 'indifference,' 'fear,' and 'uncertainty' are emerged. 'Lack of information about screening modalities' is the overarching schema with reference to breast cancer screenings. Conclusions. The findings of this study demonstrate unique cultural models of KIW related to breast cancer and its screenings, which are critical to understand and penetrate their barriers to breast cancer screening.

Anthropology of power and passion, active nihilism: theme analysis on Sung, Suk-je's novel

  • Lee, Chan
    • Cross-Cultural Studies
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    • v.28
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    • pp.37-53
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    • 2012
  • This paper examines 'an active nihilism' in Suk-je Sung's novels in detail. The focus of this study is formed from the critical mind in a critical perspective that in Korean novels before and after 2000s, characters who embody 'problematic individuals' of $Luk{\acute{a}}cs$ have disappeared and those close to 'active nihilists' has become the mainstream. The most representative example of this phenomenon is Suk-je Sung's novels. 'Active nihilists' in his novels are described as 'ascetics' who mastered various spheres such as 'billiard', 'baduk gambling', 'alcohol', 'dance', and 'book collecting', and so on. In the sense that they reject the transcendental conditions of the modern world and live in the space and time of play in which they can display their passion and potentiality to the maximum, they beings jumping over the 'reality principle'. Also, what they want to repeat is not the endless exchange of labor and capital according to the capitalist system of exchange but rather the repeated existence of their power and passion. This 'anthropology of power and passion' is 'active nihilism' which could be expressed as the 'subject of creating new value' and 'Dionysian affirmation' by Nietzsche. Suk-je Sung's novels sharply prove the stylistic essence of 'a novel' which has to create its own form every time, constantly renewing the narrative style of the past ideal model. In this respect, they are very problematic and his innovation of a form draws the attention. Further, this will certainly be the important object of research in the diachronic dimension of contemporary Korean novel.