• Title, Summary, Keyword: Breast cancer incidence

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Female Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Morocco: Comparison with Other Countries

  • Khalis, Mohamed;El Rhazi, Karima;Charaka, Hafida;Chajes, Veronique;Rinaldi, Sabina;Nejjari, Chakib;Romieu, Isabelle;Charbotel, Barbara
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.12
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    • pp.5211-5216
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    • 2016
  • Background: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy and the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide. In Morocco, there have been few recent descriptive studies on female breast cancer. The aim of this study was to describe the latest available incidence and mortality rates of breast cancer among Moroccan women and to compare them with rates in other regional and Western countries. Methods: For this descriptive study, Moroccan incidence data were obtained from the most recent reports of the cancer registries of Casablanca and Rabat. Information on breast cancer incidence for different countries were obtained primarily from publicly available cancer registries and Cancer Incidence in Five Continents, Volume X. Mortality data were extracted from the GLOBOCAN 2012 published by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Results: The age-standardized incidence (World) rate of breast cancer in Moroccan women increased from 35.0 to 39.0 per 100,000 women between 2004 and 2008, showing an annual increase of 2.85 %. The highest incidence rates were registered in the age groups of 45-49, 50-54 and 55-59 years (106.1, 108.2 and 108.5 respectively). Sixty-nine percent of female breast cancer cases were diagnosed at stages II and III. In 2012, the estimated number of women who died of breast cancer in Morocco was 2,878. The crude, age-standardized (World) mortality rates were 17.3 and 18.0 per 100,000, respectively. Conclusion: Although the incidence of female breast cancer in Morocco is lower than in Western countries, evidence shows that the rate is rising. This increase of breast cancer incidence has been observed in parallel with changes in reproductive behavior and adoption of a Western lifestyle. Prevention policies need to be implemented.

Breast Cancer in Lopburi, a Province in Central Thailand: Analysis of 2001-2010 Incidence and Future Trends

  • Sangkittipaiboon, Somphob;Leklob, Atit;Sriplung, Hutcha;Bilheem, Surichai
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.18
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    • pp.8359-8364
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    • 2016
  • Background: Thailand has come to an epidemiologic transition with decreasing infectious diseases and increasing burden of chronic conditions, including cancer. Breast cancer has the highest incidence rates among females throughout Thailand. This study aimed to identify the current burden and the future trends of breast cancer of Lopburi, a province in the Central Thailand. Materials and Methods: We used cancer incidence data from the Lopburi Cancer Registry to characterize and analyze the incidence of breast cancer in Central Thailand. With joinpoint and age-period-cohort analyses, the incidence of breast cancer in the province from 2001 to 2010 and project future trends from 2011 to 2030 was investigated. Results: Age-adjusted incidence rates of breast cancer in Lopburi increased from 23.4 to 34.3 cases per 100,000 female population during the period, equivalent to an annual percentage change of 4.3% per year. Both period and cohort effects played a role in shaping the increase in incidence. Joinpoint projection suggested that incidence rates would continue to increase in the future with incidence for women ages 50 years and above increasing at a higher rate than for women below the age of 50. Conclusions: The current situation where early detection measures are being promoted could increase detection rates of the disease. Preparation of sufficient budget for treatment facilities and human resources, both in surgical and medical oncology, is essential for future medical care.

Past Trends and Future Estimation of Annual Breast Cancer Incidence in Osaka, Japan

  • Toyoda, Yasuhiro;Tabuchi, Takahiro;Nakayama, Tomio;Hojo, Shigeyuki;Yoshioka, Setsuko;Maeura, Yoshiichi
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.6
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    • pp.2847-2852
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    • 2016
  • Background: Although the breast cancer incidence rate in Japan is lower than in western countries, the age-specific rates have markedly increased in recent years, along with the problems of declining birth rate and an aging population. Materials and Methods: We examined past trends of age-specific breast cancer incidence using data from the Osaka Cancer Registry from 1976 to 2010, and estimated future trends until 2025 based on the changes observed and population dynamics using a log linear regression model. Results: The age-specific breast cancer incidence rate has increased consistently from the 1970s, and the rates have caught up with those of Japanese-Americans in the US. Assuming the increasing tendency of age-specific breast cancer incidence to be constant, the average annual incidence of breast cancer will increase 1.7-fold from 2006-2010 to 2021-2025. Furthermore, the number of patients aged 80 years should increase 3.4-fold. Conclusions: The medical demand for breast cancer care in Japan may increase explosively in the future, particularly among the elderly. We need to prepare for such a future increase in demand for care, although careful monitoring is needed to confirm these results.

Multidisciplinary Approach to Breast Cancer Care

  • Juon, Hee-Soon
    • Perspectives in Nursing Science
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    • v.4 no.1
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    • pp.1-8
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    • 2007
  • Aim: The purpose of this paper is to present the importance of multidisciplinary strategies in cancer prevention and control, especially comprehensive breast cancer care. Background: Worldwide, breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed among women and is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Although the incidence of breast cancer in Asian countries is still lower than in Western countries, the rate of increase for the last two decades is striking. Methods: Data on cancer mortality, incidence, and risk factors were summarized by using the most recent data available from population-based cancer registries affiliated with the International Union Against Cancer, the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program and the CDC's National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR). Results: Global differences in breast cancer incidence and fluctuations in rates within a country still exist. The incidence of breast cancer in Asian countries was lower than in Western countries. Breast cancer incidence in the United States decreased each year during 1999-2003. On the other hand, morbidity and mortality related to breast cancer in Asia has increased significantly. Conclusion: Multidisciplinary strategies to reduce breast cancer mortality and promote breast cancer awareness are addressed. Lessons learned from multidisciplinary approaches to cancer treatment and control will be valuable in implementing future breast cancer research in the fields of basic, clinical, and population research in Asia.

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Incidence and Mortality and Epidemiology of Breast Cancer in the World

  • Ghoncheh, Mahshid;Pournamdar, Zahra;Salehiniya, Hamid
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.sup3
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    • pp.43-46
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    • 2016
  • Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women around the world. Information on the incidence and mortality of breast cancer is essential for planning health measures. This study aimed to investigate the incidence and mortality of breast cancer in the world using age-specific incidence and mortality rates for the year 2012 acquired from the global cancer project (GLOBOCAN 2012) as well as data about incidence and mortality of the cancer based on national reports. It was estimated that 1,671,149 new cases of breast cancer were identified and 521,907 cases of deaths due to breast cancer occurred in the world in 2012. According to GLOBOCAN, it is the most common cancer in women, accounting for 25.1% of all cancers. Breast cancer incidence in developed countries is higher, while relative mortality is greatest in less developed countries. Education of women is suggested in all countries for early detection and treatment. Plans for the control and prevention of this cancer must be a high priority for health policy makers; also, it is necessary to increase awareness of risk factors and early detection in less developed countries.

Breast Cancer in Iraq, Incidence Trends from 2000-2009

  • AL-Hashimi, Muzahem Mohammed Yahya;Wang, Xiang Jun
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.1
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    • pp.281-286
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    • 2014
  • Background: Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy of women worldwide. In Iraq, breast cancer ranks first among cancers diagnosed in women but no studies have been conducted on incidence trends. The present study of breast cancer in the country during 2000-2009 was therefore performed. Materials and Metbods: The registered data for breast cancer cases were collected from the Iraqi Cancer Registry/Ministry of Health. The significance of incidence rate trends during 2000-2009 was tested using Poisson regression. Age-standardized rates (ASR), and age-specific rates per 100,000 population were calculated. ResultS" A total of 23,792 incident breast cancer cases were registered among females aged ${\geq}15$ years, represented 33.8% of all cancers in females registered during 2000-2009. It ranked first in all the years. The median age at diagnosis was 49 and the mean age was 52 years. The incidence rate of all female breast cancer in Iraq (all ages) increased from 26.6 per 100,000 in 2000 to 31.5 per 100,000 in 2009 (APC=1.14%, p<.0001). The incidence in age groups (40-49), (50-59) and (70+) increased in earlier years and has recently (2005-2009) become stable. The incidence in age group (60-69) did not decline since 2003, while the incidence rates in the age group (15-39) started to decline in 2004. Conclusions' With the Iraqi Cancer Registry data during the period 2000-2009, the incidence of all female breast cancer in Iraq (all ages) has risen. We found rapid increase in the age specific incidence rate among age group 60-69. However, breast cancer among Iraqi women still affects younger age groups than their counterparts in developed countries. Further epidemiological research is needed to examine possible causes and prevention measures.

Epidemiology, Incidence and Mortality of Breast Cancer in Asia

  • Ghoncheh, Mahshid;Mahdavifar, Neda;Darvishi, Efat;Salehiniya, Hamid
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.sup3
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    • pp.47-52
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    • 2016
  • Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in Asia and its incidence is rapidly increasing. Information on the incidence and mortality of breast cancer is essential for planning health and more studies. This study aimed to investigate the age-specific incidence and mortality of breast cancer in Asia in 2012. A total of 639,824 cases of breast cancer were recorded in Asian countries, those with the five highest standardized incidence rates being Israel, Lebanon, Armenia, Singapore, and Kazakhstan. The highest number of deaths was observed in India, China, Indonesia, Pakistan, and Japan, respectively. Tith increasing income and improving living standards in developing countries, the incidence of breast cancer increases. This may be due to longer life, higher exposure to risk factors, eating more fatty foods and obesity, and lower pregnancy rates. The variation in incidence rates of breast cancer is very pronounced in Asia (from 80.5 in Israel to 4.6 in Bhuta). A similar situation exists for mortality rates (from 1.8 in Bhutan to 25.2 in Pakistan).

Incidence and Survival in Breast Cancer Patients and Stressful Life Events

  • Fallah, Raheleh;Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil;Azargashb, Eznollah;Khayamzadeh, E
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.sup3
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    • pp.245-252
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    • 2016
  • Due to increasing incidence of breast cancer, recognition of risk factors has become increasingly important. Over the past few decades, among risk factors of this disease, stressful life events have attracted particular attention, but their relationship with breast cancer incidence and survival remains a mystery. This study aimed to examine the relationship between severe stressful life events and incidence and survival of women with breast cancer. In this case-control study, using a structured telephone interview with 355 women with breast cancer and also with 516 women with benign breast diseases who were matched in demographic characteristics, necessary information about the experience of major stressful events in the years before the diagnosis were collected. Data were analyzed using statistical methods of ${\chi}^2$, t, and Kaplan-Meier with a significance level of <0.05. Generally, in the case and control groups, there were no significant association between experience of stressful life events and incidence of breast cancer. Regarding associations between each of the events and incidence of breast cancer only "severe interpersonal problems with spouse" was significant. In the breast cancer group, even after controlling confounding variables, there was no significant association between major stressful events and disease-free survival, or overall 5-and 10-year survival. In this study, only "severe interpersonal problems with spouse" was confirmed as a risk factor. This result can be useful in developing preventive policies. More research regarding the interactive effects of psycho-social factors in the incidence and survival of breast cancer with stressful life events is recommended.

Breast Cancer in Surat Thani, a Province in Southern Thailand: Analysis of 2004-2012 Incidence and Future Trends

  • Tassanasunthornwong, Sukit;Chansaard, Wasan;Sriplung, Hutcha;Bilheem, Surichai
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.15
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    • pp.6735-6740
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    • 2015
  • Background: With the recent epidemiologic transition in Thailand, featuring decreasing incidences of infectious diseases along with increasing rates of chronic conditions, cancer is becoming a serious problem for the country. Breast cancer has the highest incidence rates among females, not only in the southern regions, but throughout Thailand. Surat Thani is a province in the upper part of Southern Thailand. A study was needed to identify the current burden, and the future trends of breast cancer. Materials and Methods: Here we used cancer incidence data from the Surat Thani Cancer Registry to characterize the incidences of breast cancer. Joinpoint analysis was used to investigate the incidences in the province from 2004 to 2012 and to project future trends from 2013 to 2030. Results: Age-standardized incidence rates (world) of breast cancer in the upper parts of Southern Thailand increased from 35.1 to 59.2 cases per 100,000 female population, which is equivalent to an annual percentage change of 4.5-4.8%. Linear drift effects played a role in shaping the increase of incidence. Joinpoint projection suggested that incidence rates would continue to increase in the future with incidence for women aged 50 and above, at a higher rate than for women below the age of 50. Conclusions: The current early detection measures increase detection rates of early disease. Preparation of a budget for treatment facilities and human resources, both in surgical and medical oncology, is essential.

Comparison of Male and Female Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality Trends in Central Serbia

  • Sipetic-Grujicic, Sandra;Murtezani, Zafir;Ratkov, Isidora;Grgurevic, Anita;Marinkovic, Jelena;Bjekic, Milan;Miljus, Dragan
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.10
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    • pp.5681-5685
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    • 2013
  • Background: To compare breast cancer incidence and mortality trends in Central Serbia between males and females in the period 1999-2009. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, mortality data were obtained from the National Statistics Institute and morbidity data were derived from Institute of Public Health of Serbia for the period of interest. Results: Breast cancer is a leading cancer in the female population of Central Serbia, whereas in male population it is not on the list of 10 leading localizations, concerning both incidence as well as mortality. In the period 1999-2009 the average standardized incidence rates of breast cancer were 60.5/100,000 in women and 1.4/100,000 in men, while average standardized mortality rates were 20.4/100,000 and 0.4/100,000. The average standardized incidence and mortality rates were about 45 times higher in females than males. Male breast cancer comprises approximately 2.1% of all breast cancer cases. The average age-specific mortality and incidence rates increased with age in both sexes. In the observed period standardized mortality rates of breast cancer increased significantly only in men ($y=0.320+0.0215{\times}$, p=0.044). Conclusions: The increase of breast cancer incidence in both sexes and mortality in men, indicate an urgent need for Serbian health professionals to apply existing cancer control and preventive measures. Male breast cancer is more present than in other world regions, with an outstanding increase of mortality, which demands a timely identification (screening) and adequate treatment. A national policy including mammography should be considered in the light of the newest findings.