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Effect of Spray-drying Condition and Surfactant Addition on Morphological Characteristics of Spray-dried Nanocellulose

  • Park, Chan-Woo (Department of Forest Biomaterials & Engineering, College of Forest and Environmental Sciences, Kangwon National University) ;
  • Han, Song-Yi (Department of Forest Biomaterials & Engineering, College of Forest and Environmental Sciences, Kangwon National University) ;
  • Namgung, Hyun-Woo (Department of Forest Biomaterials & Engineering, College of Forest and Environmental Sciences, Kangwon National University) ;
  • Seo, Pureun-Narae (Department of Forest Biomaterials & Engineering, College of Forest and Environmental Sciences, Kangwon National University) ;
  • Lee, Seung-Hwan (Department of Forest Biomaterials & Engineering, College of Forest and Environmental Sciences, Kangwon National University)
  • Received : 2017.02.08
  • Accepted : 2017.02.13
  • Published : 2017.02.28

Abstract

In this study, spray-drying yield and morphological characterization of spray-dried cellulose nanofibril (CNF) and TEMPO-oxidized nanocellulose (TONC) depending on spray-drying condition and surfactant addition was investigated. As spray-drying temperature increased, the yield of spray-dried CNF was increased. The highest spray-drying yields in both nanocelluloses were found at didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC) addition of 2.5 phr at all investigated temperatures. The spray-dried CNF was the sphere-like particle, but the spray-dried TONC showed both rod and sphere-like morphology. The average diameter of spray-dried CNF was decreased with increasing DDAC addition amount, resulting in the increase of specific surface area.

Keywords

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Korea Forest Service, Kangwon National University

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