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Seven-Day Continuous Abstinence Rate from Smoking at 1, 2, or 3 Years after the Use of Varenicline

  • Kim, Jin Se (Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine) ;
  • Jang, Ju Young (Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine) ;
  • Park, Eun Hye (Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine) ;
  • Lee, Joo Young (Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine) ;
  • Gu, Kang Mo (Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine) ;
  • Jung, Jae Woo (Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine) ;
  • Choi, Jae Chol (Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine) ;
  • Shin, Jong Wook (Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine) ;
  • Park, In Won (Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine) ;
  • Choi, Byoung Whui (Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine) ;
  • Kim, Jae Yeol (Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine)
  • Received : 2014.02.20
  • Accepted : 2014.05.21
  • Published : 2015.02.28

Abstract

Background: Varenicline, a selective partial agonist/antagonist of the ${\alpha}4{\beta}2$ nicotinic receptor, has proven effectiveness for smoking cessation by several randomized, controlled trials. Because few studies have evaluated the long-term efficacy of varenicline, we tried to evaluate the smoking status of varenicline users up to 3 years after the initial prescription of the drug. Methods: We interviewed varenicline users who were prescribed the drug from June 2007 to May 2010 by telephone, from June 2010 to May 2011. Results: One-hundred and thirty-three of 250 varenicline users (53.2%) were available for the survey. Seven-day continuous abstinence from smoking was adhered to by 17 of 39 respondents (43.6%) at 1 year, and 11 of 36 (30.6%) and 19 of 58 (32.8%) at 2 and 3 years since the first use of varenicline, respectively. Compared to current smokers, successful quitters were older (55.0 years vs. 49.9 years, p=0.01), had better compliance to the 12-week course (27.7 vs. 9.3%, p=0.01), and had taken varenicline longer (10.1 vs. 5.9 weeks, p=0.01). Fifty-four of 71 current smokers (76.1%) were willing to stop smoking in the near future. The preferred ways to cease smoking were will-power (48.1%), varenicline (25.9%), nicotine replacement therapy (11.1%), and others (14.9%). Conclusion: Smokers should be encouraged to stick to the proven way for recommended period of time for successful cessation of smoking.

Keywords

References

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