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Efficacy and Safety of Bevacizumab in Chinese Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

  • Zhu, Li-Ming (Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital) ;
  • Zhao, Ya-Zhen (Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital) ;
  • Ju, Hai-Xing (Department of Surgery, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital) ;
  • Liu, Lu-Ying (Department of Radiotherapy, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital) ;
  • Chen, Lei (Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital) ;
  • Liu, Bi-Xia (Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital) ;
  • Xu, Qi (Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital) ;
  • Luo, Cong (Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital) ;
  • Ying, Jie-Er (Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital) ;
  • Yang, Yun-Shan (Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital) ;
  • Zhong, Hai-Jun (Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital)
  • Published : 2014.08.30

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab in the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: In a single-center, observational study of 91 Chinese patients with mCRC who received bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy was conducted. Objective response rates (ORRs), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and adverse events were recorded, and the relationships between various clinical factors and PFS or OS were evaluated by Cox proportional hazards models. Results: Treatment with bevacizumab and chemotherapy was effective and tolerable. Univariate analysis showed that PFS and OS were significantly associated with the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG-PS) score, duration of bevacizumab exposure, and whether chemotherapy was continued after discontinuation of bevacizumab treatment. A multivariate analysis showed that the duration of bevacizumab exposure and whether chemotherapy was continued after discontinuation of bevacizumab were independent prognostic factors for PFS and OS. Conclusion: In Chinese mCRC population, the shorter the duration of exposure to bevacizumab and chemotherapy, the worse the prognosis is.

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