• Title, Summary, Keyword: tobacco cessation services

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Tobacco Cessation in India: How Can Oral Health Professionals Contribute?

  • Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh;Sharma, Gaurav;Nagpal, Archana;Oberoi, Avneet
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.5
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    • pp.2383-2391
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    • 2014
  • Tobacco use is described as the single most preventable cause of morbidity and mortality globally, with the World Bank predicting over 450 million tobacco-related deaths in the next fifty years. In India, the proportion of all deaths that can be attributed to tobacco use is expected to rise from 1.4% in 1990 to 13.3% in 2020 of which smoking alone will cause about 930,000 adult deaths by 2010. Many studies have shown that counseling from a health professional is an effective method of helping patients quit the tobacco habit. Tobacco cessation needs to be urgently expanded by training health professionals in providing routine clinical interventions, increasing availability and subsidies of pharmacotherapy, developing wide-reaching strategies such as quitlines, and costeffective strategies, including group interventions. The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) emphasizes the vital contribution of participation of health professional bodies, as well as training and healthcare institutions in tobacco control efforts. Dentists can play an important role in helping patients quit using tobacco. One of the key strategies to reduce tobacco-related morbidity and mortality is to encourage the involvement of health professionals in tobacco-use prevention and cessation counselling. The dental office is an ideal setting for tobacco cessation services since preventive treatment services, oral screening, and patient education have always been a large part of the dental practice.

Perception and Practices of Physicians in Addressing the Smokeless Tobacco Epidemic: Findings from Two States in India

  • Panda, Rajmohan;Persai, Divya;Mathur, Manu;Sarkar, Bidyut Kanti
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.12
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    • pp.7237-7241
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    • 2013
  • Background: Smokeless tobacco use in South Asia is believed to be a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality. In India, only a few studies involving health educational intervention by health care providers have demonstrated reduction in smokeless tobacco usage. In the present study we assessed the cessation efforts towards smokeless tobacco by physicians in two high tobacco prevalence states of India. The study also identified opportunities and barriers for integration of tobacco cessation services in routine practices of physicians. Materials and Methods: This mixed method study involved qualitative (phase I) and quantitative research study (phase II). In phase I, 59 in-depth interviews with physicians were conducted. In phase II, a quantitative study conducted among 238 physicians. An inductive approach was followed to analyze qualitative data using ATLAS. Ti software. The Chi-square test was employed to test the association between different variables of interest using SPSS version 17. Results: The majority of physicians related only respiratory problems and cancer with smokeless tobacco. Other major health effects like cardio-vascular problems, oral diseases, and effects on reproductive and neonatal health were recognized only by a few physicians. The age-group of 10-19 years was identified as most vulnerable to smokeless tobacco use. Less than one-third of physicians reported recording smokeless tobacco history of all patients. Findings indicated that less than half of physicians provided information on harmful health effects of smokeless tobacco with regard to specific diseases. Conclusions: The study revealed a low level of knowledge of physicians about harmful effects of tobacco and their suboptimal engagement in tobacco control practices. The study indicates the need of capacity building initiatives to equip physicians with skills in tobacco cessation.

The Status and Future Challenges of Tobacco Control Policy in Korea

  • Cho, Hong-Jun
    • Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
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    • v.47 no.3
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    • pp.129-135
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    • 2014
  • Tobacco use is the most important preventable risk factor for premature death. The World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), the first international public health treaty, came into force in 2005. This paper reviews the present status of tobacco control policies in Korea according to the WHO FCTC recommendations. In Korea, cigarette use is high among adult males (48.2% in 2010), and cigarette prices are the lowest among the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries with no tax increases since 2004. Smoke-free policies have shown incremental progress since 1995, but smoking is still permitted in many indoor public places. More than 30% of non-smoking adults and adolescents are exposed to second-hand smoke. Public education on the harmful effects of tobacco is currently insufficient and the current policies have not been adequately evaluated. There is no comprehensive ban on tobacco advertising, promotion, or sponsorship in Korea. Cigarette packages have text health warnings on only 30% of the main packaging area, and misleading terms such as "mild" and "light" are permitted. There are nationwide smoking cessation clinics and a Quitline service, but cessation services are not covered by public insurance schemes and there are no national treatment guidelines. The sale of tobacco to minors is prohibited by law, but is poorly enforced. The socioeconomic inequality of smoking prevalence has widened, although the government considers inequality reduction to be a national goal. The tobacco control policies in Korea have faltered recently and priority should be given to the development of comprehensive tobacco control policies.

Effectiveness of Tobacco Education for Pharmacy Students in Indonesia

  • Kristina, Susi Ari;Thavorncharoensap, Montarat;Pongcharoensuk, Petcharat;Montakantikul, Preecha;Suansanae, Thanarat;Prabandari, Yayi Suryo
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.24
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    • pp.10783-10786
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    • 2015
  • Background: Smoking remains the major preventable cause of death worldwide, especially cancer-related death. Evidence clearly indicates that tobacco-related morbidity and mortality is reduced by smoking cessation. Pharmacists are well-positioned to provide tobacco cessation services an involvement of pharmacists in smoking cessation is encouraged by several organizations. While Indonesia's prevalence of smoking is in the first rank in Asian countries, none of the pharmacy schools in Indonesia are currently offering tobacco-related courses in their existing curricula at present. Our study aimed to develop and to evaluate the effectiveness of tobacco education (TE) for pharmacy students in Indonesia. Materials and Methods: A 6-hour TE was developed and evaluated using pre-test/post-test with control group design. A total of 137 fifth-year pharmacy students at Gadjah Mada University (GMU), Yogyakarta, were chosen as an intervention group while a total of 105 fifth-year students of Islamic University of Indonesia, (UII) served as the control group. Knowledge, perceived-role, self-efficacy, and ability to perform counseling using the 5A's framework were evaluated. Results: A significant improvement (P < 0.001) in knowledge, perceived-role, and self-efficacy was found in the intervention group but not in the control group. In addition, we revealed that 89.7% of the intervention group were able to perform counseling using 5A's. Conclusions: The developed TE significantly improved student knowledge, perceived-rolse, self-efficacy, and created an ability to perform cessation counseling. Integration of TE education in curricula of Indonesian pharmacy schools nation-wide should be encouraged.

Quitline Activity in the Republic of Korea

  • Yun, E Hwa;Lim, Min Kyung;Oh, Jin-Kyoung;Ki, In Ha;Shin, Sang-Hwa;Jeong, Bo Yoon
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.sup2
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    • pp.1-5
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    • 2016
  • To reduce tobacco use and related harm in Korea, telephone based cessation services (Quitlines) began full operation to provide regular behavioral counseling for smoking cessation in 2006. After registration in the cessation program, at least 21 calls per year are given to each client to help quit and encourage maintenance. Tailored programs for males, females, and adolescent smokers have been offered taking into account smokers' characteristics and smoking behavior. Mailing self-help quit packs and e-mail and SMS services are allowable as additional services.A total of 23,201 smokers were registered on the Quitline program from 2006 to 2014. In 2014, an average of 13,343 calls per month have been received by 28 coaches, the 1 year abstinence rate of clients is 26%, and clients' satisfaction rate is 81.6%. After introduction of the call system in 2007, client convenience and effective operations have been achieved with high technology support of a computer-based telephone system. Systematic education and evaluation programs for quit coaches have contributed to quality assurance of the services. Currently, research into development of new programs and evaluation of Quitline performance is being undertaken. A Comprehensive Multi-channel Cessation Center (CMCC) has been suggested and is now planned as a next step in the national program for smoking cessation.

Development of Smoking Cessation Education Program for Nursing Students (간호대학생을 위한 금연교육 프로그램 개발)

  • Song, Mi-Sook;Boo, Sunjoo
    • The Journal of Korean Society for School & Community Health Education
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    • v.18 no.3
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    • pp.107-121
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    • 2017
  • Objectives: Given that the expansion of smoking cessation regulations in Korea generates great demand for smoking cessation services, healthcare professionals should be up skilled to make an important contribution to tobacco control. This study was aimed to develop a smoking cessation education program for nursing students and to try to find possible ways to incorporate the smoking cessation education in their regular course program. Methods: One group pre- & post-test design was used. The subjects were 70 nursing students from two universities in S and D city. Subjects were participated in a four-hour smoking cessation education program developed for increasing knowledge, competency, and self-efficacy for smoking cessation counselling. Data were analysed with descriptives and paired t-tests. Results: The developed education program for smoking cessation counselling produced a substantial effects in terms of knowledge, competency, and especially for self-efficacy for smoking cessation counselling. Conclusions: Smoking cessation advices and support from health professionals are key aspects of a comprehensive approach to smoking cessation. Incorporating the smoking cessation education program developed in this study in the regular baccalaureate program for nursing students may help increase the involvement of nurses in cessation counseling upon graduation.

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A Research on the Actual Smoking State and Awareness of some Dental Hygiene Students (일부 치위생(학)과 학생들의 흡연실태 및 인식도 조사)

  • Kim, Hee-Kyoung;Kim, Eun-Ju;Lee, Min-Sun;Um, Mi-Ran;Ma, Deuk-Sang;Choi, Yong-Keum
    • Journal of dental hygiene science
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    • v.9 no.2
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    • pp.241-247
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    • 2009
  • The objective of this research can be found in its use as a basic material to induce students from the department of dental hygiene to quit smoking, by raising the awareness of tobacco cessation as well as the actual smoking state. The graduating undergraduates from 10 universities (including colleges) based on their 61 major departments across the country took pan in this questionnaire. The questionnaire basically consists of the understanding of smoking, a state of smoking or tobacco cessation(5 questions), and the advisory guidance on quit smoking(4 questions). The questionnaire on the awareness of smoking relating to those work for the health and medical services is based upon the papers published from WHO (World Health Organization), which is aimed to find out the smoking rate of those involved in the health and medical services around the world. In addition, an adequate education for smoking students from the department of dental and hygiene should be taken into account in an effort to raise the awareness of smoking and the necessity of tobacco cessation.

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Tobacco Control Policies in Vietnam: Review on MPOWER Implementation Progress and Challenges

  • Hoang, Van Minh;Tran, Thu Ngan;Vu, Quynh Mai;Nguyen, Thi Tuyet My;Le, Hong Chung;Vu, Duy Kien;Tran, Tuan Anh;Nguyen, Bao Ngoc;Vu, Van Giap;Nguyen, Manh Cuong;Pham, Duc Manh;Kim, Bao Giang
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.sup1
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    • pp.1-9
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    • 2016
  • In Vietnam, the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) took effect in March 2005 while MPOWER has been implemented since 2008. This paper describes the progress and challenges of implementation of the MPOWER package in Vietnam. We can report that, in term of monitoring, Vietnam is very active in the Global Tobacco Surveillance System, completing two rounds of the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) and three rounds of the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS). To protect people from tobacco smoke, Vietnam has issued and enforced a law requiring comprehensive smoking bans at workplaces and public places since 2013. Tobacco advertising and promotion are also prohibited with the exception of points of sale displays of tobacco products. Violations come in the form of promotion girls, corporate social responsibility activities from tobacco manufacturers and packages displayed by retail vendors. Vietnam is one of the 77 countries that require pictorial health warnings to be printed on cigarette packages to warn about the danger of tobacco and the warnings have been implemented effectively. Cigarette tax is 70% of factory price which is equal to less than 45% of retail price and much lower than the recommendation of WHO. However, Vietnam is one of the very few countries that require manufacturers and importers to make "compulsory contributions" at 1-2% of the factory price of cigarettes sold in Vietnam for the establishment of a Tobacco Control Fund (TCF). The TCF is being operated well. In 2015, 67 units of 63 provinces/cities, 22 ministries and political-social organizations and 6 hospitals received funding from TCF to implement a wide range of tobacco control activities. Cessation services have been starting with a a toll-free quit-line but need to be further strengthened. In conclusion, Vietnam has constantly put efforts into the tobacco control field with high commitment from the government, scientists and activists. Though several remarkable achievements have been gained, many challenges remain. To overcome those challenges, implementation strategies that take into account the contextual factors and social determinants of tobacco use in Vietnam are needed.

An Exploratory Analysis School-based Intervention Studies to Prevent Smoking by American Adolescents (미국의 청소년 흡연예방을 위한 중재 프로그램의 현황)

  • Jung, Hye-Sun;Ha, Yeong-Mi;Jhang, Won-Gi;Lee, Ji-Won;Yi, Yun-Jeong;Yun, Soon-Nyung
    • Journal of the Korean Society of School Health
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    • v.21 no.2
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    • pp.119-134
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    • 2008
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study is to understand a variety of intervention studies to prevent smoking by adolescents in U.S. and find out implications for Korea. Methods: This study reviewed articles found in the internet and analysed the data of US DHHS and CDC. Results: The School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and programs of U.S. The main components of SHPPS are health education and physical education, health services, mental health and social services, school policies, and school environments. The CDC guidelines for school health programs to prevent tobacco use and addiction are composed of policy, instruction, curriculum, training, family involvement, tobacco-use cessation efforts, and evaluation. School-based interventions to prevent smoking can be classified into the categories of information-giving curricula, social competence curricula, social influence approaches, combined methods draw on social competence and social influence approaches and multi-modal programmes and Youth Empowerment study. The key programs for adolescent smoking prevention are ALERT Project, HSPP, TNT Project, MPP, NC YES. Conclusions: As smoking is often the first step of unhealthy behaviour such as alcohol drinking, illegal drugs, and violence, smoking prevention programmes for adolescents in U.S. have been comprehensive school-based health programs. In smoking prevention programs for adolescents, CDC plays a critical role by supporting survey, research, policy, and funds. The effectiveness of the programs was high when it was based on school and involved parents, community, and mass media. As the effect of each programme is not expected to last for a long time, consistent repetition of these interventions is essential. Current smoking prevention programs for adolescents are exploring the empowerment approach focused on the active involvement of participants rather than traditional approaches using order and discipline.

Cardiac Rehabilitation and Quality of Life (심장재활과 삶의 질)

  • Choo, Jin-A
    • Journal of Korean Academic Society of Home Health Care Nursing
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    • v.15 no.2
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    • pp.82-90
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    • 2008
  • Recent shortening of hospitalization has partly led to the transition of health care services from hospitals to communities in cardiovascular (CVD) care. Home healthcare nursing is an alternative modality of care for chronically ill CVD patients. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has been redefined as a "secondary prevention center", consisting of: patient assessment; nutritional counseling; blood pressure and diabetes management; tobacco cessation; psychosocial management; and physical activity counseling. Improvement in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is a major goal of the CR that integrates physical, psychological and social dimensions of care. The review of evidence on effects of CR on HRQOL may allow home healthcare nurses to provide better comprehensive care for CVD patients. There is evidence on beneficial effects of CR on HRQOL in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) as well as patients with chronic heart failure. Specifically, home-based CR, which is more cost-effective than hospital-based CR, has been reported to produce comparable improvements in HRQOL with hospital-based CR in MI patients. In conclusion, a newly-designed, home-based CR may be required to be applied to Korean home healthcare nursing system for improving HRQOL.

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