• Title, Summary, Keyword: tobacco cessation

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Predictors of Quitting Tobacco - Results of a Worksite Tobacco Cessation Service Program Among Factory Workers in Mumbai, india

  • Pimple, Sharmila;Pednekar, Mangesh;Mazumdar, Parishi;Goswami, Savita;Shastri, Surendra
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.2
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    • pp.533-538
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    • 2012
  • Background: Tobacco cessation would provide the most immediate benefits of tobacco control to prevent tobacco related disease morbidity and mortality. Methods: A tobacco cessation program involving individual and group behavior therapy was implemented in three stages at a worksite. Tobacco quit rates were assessed at the end of each contact session. Results: Out of the 291 tobacco users identified, 224 participated in the tobacco cessation interventions. At the end of three interventions, 38 (17%) users had successfully quit tobacco use. Presence of clinical oral pre-cancer lesion was found to be associated with quitting (p=0.02). Also tobacco users with oral pre-cancer lesions were around three times more likely to quit than those with no lesions (OR= 2.70 95% C.I= 1.20 - 6.05). Conclusion: Cost effective multi-pronged tobacco cessation approaches, inbuilt into other occupational health and welfare activities, are acceptable and feasible to achieve long term sustainable tobacco cessation programs at worksites.

Community Based Intervention for Tobacco Cessation: A Pilot Study Experience, North East India

  • Bhagabaty, Srabana Misra;Kataki, Amal Chandra;Kalita, Manoj;Salkar, Shekhar
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.2
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    • pp.811-814
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    • 2015
  • Background: North East India has a high prevalence of tobacco consumption, but only few individuals seek help for tobacco cessation. Impact of community based tobacco cessation intervention in this part needs more research. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was done on the dataset from a community-based tobacco cessation intervention pilot project conducted in Guwahati metro during 2009-10. Subjects, both male and female tobacco users, age > 15 years, permanent residents of these blocks giving consent were included in the study. Results: The sample was 800 tobacco users, of whom 25% visited any health care provider during last 12 months and 3% received tobacco cessation advice. An 18% quit rate was observed at six weeks follow up, more than the National average, with a 47% quit rate at eight months, while 52% of subjects reduced use. Conclusions: Higher tobacco quit rate and reduced tobacco use, no loss to follow up and negligible relapse was observed with this community based intervention design. Such designs should be given more emphasis for implementation in specified communities with very high tobacco consumption rates, cultural acceptance of tobacco and less motivation towards quitting.

Insights into the Tobacco Cessation Scenario among Dental Graduates: An Indian Perspective

  • Binnal, A.;Rajesh, G.;Denny, C.;Ahmed, J.
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.6
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    • pp.2611-2617
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    • 2012
  • Introduction: To curb the ever growing menace of tobacco and its ill effects, it is essential to prevent its usage. Dental professionals' contributions can be invaluable in this venture. Objectives: To assess Indian dental graduates' knowledge, attitude and practices towards tobacco cessation; perceived effectiveness in pursuing tobacco cessation activities; perception of factors that interfere in tobacco cessation as barriers; and willingness to participate in tobacco cessation. Further, to determine associations among the aforementioned variables. Methodology: All house surgeons in Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal University, Mangalore were included in the study. A structured, pre-tested and self-administered questionnaire was employed to assess participants' knowledge, attitude, behavior, perceived effectiveness, perceived barriers and willingness to participate in tobacco cessation. Information regarding respondents' age, gender and residence was collected. Results: A total of 100 out of 103 respondents participated in the study. Mean knowledge, attitude, behavior, perceived effectiveness, perceived barrier scores were $17.6{\pm}2.53$ (73.2%), $72.1{\pm}6.59$ (90.2%), $28.3{\pm}5.12$ (67.4%), $13.3{\pm}5.36$ (53.16%) and $35.0{\pm}3.79$ (89.8%) respectively. Overall, 97% respondents were willing to participate in tobacco cessation activities. Correlation analysis revealed that knowledge was associated with attitude (r=0.36, p=0.00) and perceived barriers (r=0.34, p=0.00) and behavior was associated with perceived barriers (r=0.22, p=0.03). Conclusions: Respondents reported high knowledge and attitude scores, along with high perceived barriers scores and willingness to participate in tobacco cessation activities. Present study highlights the need for a more meaningful involvement of dental professionals in tobacco cessation and has policy implications for curriculum changes regarding the same.

Tobacco Cessation Activities of Dental Staffs in Wonju City (원주시 치과의원 종사자의 금연지도활동에 대한 실태조사)

  • Jang, Sun-Ok;Shin Bo-Mi;Cho, Mi-Hang;Lee, Min-Sun;Kim, So-Ra;Kim, Kyung-Jin;Yang, Min-Ju;Kim, Da-Hae;Chung, Won-Gyun
    • Journal of dental hygiene science
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    • v.9 no.4
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    • pp.397-404
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    • 2009
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tobacco cessation activities of the dental staffs in Wonju city. All 137 subjects were surveyed by structured questionnaire with convenience sampling. The distribution and correlation of attitude, behavior, and intervention were evaluated by both frequency test and ANOVA test. 75.2% of total subjects responded that the dental staff should give a model through prohibition of smoking and 66.5% responded that tobacco cessation activities should be responsibility of the dental staff. Tobacco cessation counsel was performed by little but with positive attitude. Advice method of tobacco cessation was used to counsel on tobacco cessation (68.6%). The dentists (48.2%) and dental hygienists (23.4%) were responded adequate for the tobacco cessation counselor, however, it was shown that the dentist had lower level of attitude about tobacco cessation than dental hygienist (p<0.01). The dental staff needs to participate in the tobacco cessation counseling program more regularly and actively. In order for the dental staffs gets the counsel effectively and intervene with tobacco cessation, it is essential that the education of tobacco cessation is integrated in dental school. Furthermore, it is necessary for the dental staffs to take continuing education for more effective understanding of tobacco cessation.

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Tobacco Cessation in India: How Can Oral Health Professionals Contribute?

  • Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh;Sharma, Gaurav;Nagpal, Archana;Oberoi, Avneet
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.5
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    • pp.2383-2391
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    • 2014
  • Tobacco use is described as the single most preventable cause of morbidity and mortality globally, with the World Bank predicting over 450 million tobacco-related deaths in the next fifty years. In India, the proportion of all deaths that can be attributed to tobacco use is expected to rise from 1.4% in 1990 to 13.3% in 2020 of which smoking alone will cause about 930,000 adult deaths by 2010. Many studies have shown that counseling from a health professional is an effective method of helping patients quit the tobacco habit. Tobacco cessation needs to be urgently expanded by training health professionals in providing routine clinical interventions, increasing availability and subsidies of pharmacotherapy, developing wide-reaching strategies such as quitlines, and costeffective strategies, including group interventions. The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) emphasizes the vital contribution of participation of health professional bodies, as well as training and healthcare institutions in tobacco control efforts. Dentists can play an important role in helping patients quit using tobacco. One of the key strategies to reduce tobacco-related morbidity and mortality is to encourage the involvement of health professionals in tobacco-use prevention and cessation counselling. The dental office is an ideal setting for tobacco cessation services since preventive treatment services, oral screening, and patient education have always been a large part of the dental practice.

Assessment of Tobacco Habits, Attitudes, and Education Among Medical Students in the United States and Italy: A Cross-sectional Survey

  • Armstrong, Grayson W.;Veronese, Giacomo;George, Paul F.;Montroni, Isacco;Ugolini, Giampaolo
    • Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
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    • v.50 no.3
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    • pp.177-187
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    • 2017
  • Objectives: Medical students represent a primary target for tobacco cessation training. This study assessed the prevalence of medical students' tobacco use, attitudes, clinical skills, and tobacco-related curricula in two countries, the US and Italy, with known baseline disparities in hopes of identifying potential corrective interventions. Methods: From September to December 2013, medical students enrolled at the University of Bologna and at Brown University were recruited via email to answer survey questions assessing the prevalence of medical students' tobacco use, attitudes and clinical skills related to patients' smoking, and elements of medical school curricula related to tobacco use. Results: Of the 449 medical students enrolled at Brown and the 1426 enrolled at Bologna, 174 Brown students (38.7%) and 527 Bologna students (36.9%) participated in this study. Italian students were more likely to smoke (29.5% vs. 6.1%; p<0.001) and less likely to receive smoking cessation training (9.4% vs. 80.3%; p<0.001) than their American counterparts, even though the majority of students in both countries desired smoking cessation training (98.6% at Brown, 85.4% at Bologna; p<0.001). Additionally, negative beliefs regarding tobacco usage, the absence of formal training in smoking cessation counseling, and a negative interest in receiving specific training on smoking cessation were associated with a higher risk of not investigating a patient's smoking status during a routine history and not offering tobacco cessation treatment to patients. Conclusions: Medical curricula on tobacco-related health hazards and on smoking cessation should be mandatory in order to reduce smoking among medical students, physicians, and patients, thereby improving tobacco-related global health.

Prisoners' Perception of Tobacco Use and Cessation in Chhatisgarh, India - The Truth from Behind the Bars

  • Tiwari, Ram Vinod;Megalamanegowdru, Jayachandra;Parakh, Abhinav;Gupta, Anjali;Gowdruviswanathan, Shailarani;Nagarajshetty, Praveen Malavalli
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.1
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    • pp.413-417
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    • 2014
  • Background: Prisoners represent a population group that is disadvantaged, socially deprived and underprivileged, needing particular attention with regard to provision of necessary oral health care, health promotion and motivation and tobacco cessation. Considering the situation in prisons, smoking and tobacco chewing are burning issues related to health deterioration and economic loss that seem to be overlooked by the public health sectors. Aim: To assess prisoners' perception of tobacco use and cessation in Chhatisgarh, India. Materials and Methods: A pre-tested, close ended questionnaire was administered in the form of extensive face to face interviews, to assess perceptions regarding tobacco use and cessation in the central jail of Durg District of Chhattisgarh state, India. Results: Prevalence of tobacco usage amongst the prisoners was found to be 61%. Some 27% reported smoking, 44% used tobacco in the chewable form and 29% indulged in consuming tobacco in both forms i.e. smoked as well as chewed. Results suggest several recommendations for policy relevance such as provision of a prison dentist, a tobacco cessation counseling program and targeted eradication of oral cancer by educating the prisoners. Conclusions: Health is a fundamental human "right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental well-being". This applies to prisoners just as it does to every other human being. The alarming findings in the study suggest the need for dental treatment facilities and tobacco cessation counseling in prisons.

Attitude and Practices Among Dentists and Senior Dental Students in Iran Toward Tobacco Cessation as an Effort to Prevent Oral Cancer

  • Razavi, Sayed Mohammad;Zolfaghari, Behzad;Doost, Mostafa Emami;Tahani, Bahareh
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.1
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    • pp.333-338
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    • 2015
  • Background: Oral health professionals are responsible in Iran for providing a brief tobacco cessation program to smoker patients. The aim of this study was to assess Iranian dental student and dentist practice, knowledge and attitudes toward smoking cessation programs. Materials and Methods: A valid and reliable self-administered questionnaire was designed and distributed to 150 dentists working in Isfahan-Iran and 60 dental students. Some questions were developed based on the expected 5A tobacco cessation protocol. Statements on attitudes focused on professional responsibility towards smoking cessation and its effectiveness. Chi-square, ANOVA, and t test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The cessation program in dental settings covers a small group of patients (18%). Some 69.1% (n=96) of dentists reported asking their patients about tobacco use, 64% (n=83) advising their patients to quit, 33.8% (n=47) assessing their patients willingness to quit and 20% (n=28) reported helping their patients in changing their behavior. A far lower percentage reported active involvement in arranging assistance for smokers to quit (4.3%, n=5). Some 22% of students and 26% of dentists disagreed that the tobacco cessation programs should be as part of dentists' professional responsibility and 70% of them were willing to follow the protocol of tobacco cessation for patients. Conclusions: Iranian dentist performance regarding tobacco cessation is weak. Dentists and students indicated their lack of knowledge as the major reason for non-adherence to the protocol. Therefore, planning to encourage dentist to follow the protocol needs continuous educational programs.

Attitudes to Smoking Cessation Interventions and Importance of Participation in Tobacco Control Policy Among Clinical Nurses (임상 간호사의 금연중재에 대한 태도와 금연정책 참여의 중요성에 대한 인식)

  • Shin, Sung-Rae;Kim, Aee-Lee
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing
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    • v.13 no.2
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    • pp.294-303
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    • 2006
  • Purpose: To describe nurses' attitude to smoking cessation interventions and importance of participation in tobacco control policy. Method: The participants were 841 nurses practicing in hospitals of 400 beds or more and 103 members of a professional nurse's academic society. The hospitals were systematically selected to cover the whole country. The questionnaire was adopted from the 'Oncology Nurses' Tobacco Control Survey' and used after translation, Results: Nurses who were older, married, had higher positions, more education, more experience, and who worked in an OPD setting had higher mean score for attitude to the involvement of nurses in smoking cessation interventions. More than 80% of nurses agreed on the importance of nurses' participation and involvement in tobacco control policy. However, only 65.4% of nurses stated that supporting laws to increase cigarette price was important. Conclusion: Clinical nurses' attitudes to smoking cessation interventions were positive and participants supported the importance of participation in tobacco control policies.

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Smoking Cessation Intervention in Rural Kerala, India: Findings of a Randomised Controlled Trial

  • Jayakrishnan, Radhakrishnan;Uutela, Antti;Mathew, Aleyamma;Auvinen, Anssi;Mathew, Preethi Sara;Sebastian, Paul
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.11
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    • pp.6797-6802
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    • 2013
  • Background: Prevalence of tobacco use is higher in the rural than urban areas of India. Unlike tobacco cessation clinics located in urban areas, community-based smoking cessation intervention has the potential to reach a wider section of the community to assist in smoking cessation in the rural setting. The present study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a cessation intervention in rural Kerala state, India. Materials and Methods: Current daily smoking resident males in the age group 18-60 years from four community development blocks in rural Kerala were randomly allocated to intervention and control groups. The intervention group received multiple approaches in which priority was given to face-to-face interviews and telephone counselling. Initially educational materials on tobacco hazards were distributed. Further, four rounds of counselling sessions were conducted which included a group counselling with a medical camp as well as individual counselling by trained medical social workers. The control group received general awareness training on tobacco hazards along with an anti-tobacco leaflet. Self-reported smoking status was assessed after 6 and 12 months. Factors associated with tobacco cessation were estimated using binomial regression method. Results: Overall prevalence of smoking abstinence was 14.7% in the intervention and 6.8% in the control group (Relative risk: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.05, 3.25). A total of 41.3% subjects in the intervention area and 13.6% in the control area had reduced smoking by 50% or more at the end of 12 months. Lower number of cigarettes/ bidi used, low nicotine dependence and consultation with a doctor for a medical ailment were the statistically significant predictors for smoking cessation. Conclusions: Rigorous approaches for smoking cessation programmes can enhance quit rates in smoking in rural areas of India.