• Title, Summary, Keyword: testicular self-examination

Search Result 4, Processing Time 0.027 seconds

Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-Examination; Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice in Final Year Medical Students in Nigeria

  • Ugwumba, Fred O;Ekwueme, Osa Eloka C;Okoh, Agharighom D
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.17 no.11
    • /
    • pp.4999-5003
    • /
    • 2016
  • The testicular cancer (TCa) incidence is increasing in many countries, with age-standardized incidence rates up to 7.8/100,000 men in the Western world, although reductions in mortality and increasingly high cure rates are being witnessed at the same time. In Africa, where rates are lower, presentation is often late and morbidity and mortality high. Given this scenario, awareness of testicular cancer and practice of testicular self-examination among future first response doctors is very important. This study was conducted to determine knowledge and attitude to testicular cancer, and practice of testicular self-examination (TSE) among final (6th) year medical students. In addition, the effect of an intervention in the form of a single PowerPoint(R) lecture, lasting 40 minutes with image content on testicular cancer and testicular self examination was assessed. Pre and post intervention administration of a self-administered structured pre tested questionnaire was performed on 151 medical students, 101 of whom returned answers (response rate of 66.8%). In the TC domain, there was a high level of awareness of testicular cancer, but poor knowledge of the age group most affected, with significant improvement post intervention (p<0.001). Notable also was the poor awareness of the potential curability of TC, this also being improved following the intervention (p<0.001). A poor level of awareness and practice of testicular self-examination pre-intervention was found considering the nature of the study group..Respondents had surprisingly weak/poor responses to the question "How important to men's health is regular testicular self-examination?" Answers to the questions "Do you think it is worthwhile to examine your testis regularly?" and "Would you be interested in more information on testicular cancer and testicular self-examination?" were also suboptimal, but improved post intervention p<0.001, p<0.001 and p=0.037. Age, gender and marital status were without specific influence. In conclusion, this study showed poor levels of knowledge regarding epidemiology of TCa and its potential curability when detected early. There was also a poor awareness of, practice of, and poor attitudes to TSE. The significant improvement in these parameters post intervention indicates value in educational intervention. We recommend inclusion of TCa coverage and TSE teaching in the secondary school curriculum (targeting adolescents). Greater emphasis should also be given to testicular cancer in the curricula of medical schools and other training institutions for health care personnel.

Effects of Small-Group Education for Testicular Self-Examination on Knowledge, Self-efficacy, and Performance Intention in Male College Students (고환자가검진에 대한 소그룹 교육이 남자 대학생의 지식, 자기효능감 및 수행의도에 미치는 효과)

  • Park, So-Mi;Chung, Chae-Weon;Park, Mi-Jeong
    • The Journal of Korean Academic Society of Nursing Education
    • /
    • v.16 no.2
    • /
    • pp.292-300
    • /
    • 2010
  • Purpose: This study examined the effects of Testicular Self-Examination (TSE) small-group education on knowledge, self-efficacy, and performance intention in male college students. Method: A non-equivalent pre-post test of quasi-experimental design was used. Out of 74 male college students selected by convenient sampling, 37 students were assigned to the experimental group and were given TSE small-group education. A 60-minute program consisted of lecture, demonstration, practice, discussion, and Q&A. Result: With an initial homogeneity between the two group, scores of knowledge about testicular cancer (p<.001), self-efficacy for TSE (p<.001), and performance intention of TSE (p<.01) of the experimental group were significantly higher than those of the control group after the intervention. Conclusion: Small group education for TSE was effective in improving knowledge about testicular cancer, self-efficacy for TSE, and intention to perform TSE. Thus, this education program is considered to be useful for testicular cancer prevention and reproductive health promotion in male college students.

Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice of Testicular Self-examination among Male University Students from Bangladesh, Madagascar, Singapore, South Africa and Turkey

  • Peltzer, Karl;Pengpid, Supa
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.16 no.11
    • /
    • pp.4741-4743
    • /
    • 2015
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge, attitude and practice of testicular self-examination (TSE) among male university students from low income (Bangladesh, Madagascar), middle income (South Africa, Turkey) and emerging economy (Singapore) countries. Using anonymous questionnaires, data were collected from 2,061 male undergraduate university students aged 16-30 (mean age 21.4, SD=2.4) from 5 universities in 5 countries across Asia and Africa. Overall, 17.6% of the male students indicated that they knew how to perform TSE; this knowledge proportion was above 20% in Bangladesh and Singapore, while it was the lowest (12.2%) in Madagascar. Among all men, 86.4% had never practiced TSE in the past 12 months, 7.1% 1-2 times, 3.5% 3-10 times, and monthly TSE was 3.1%. The proportion of past 12 month TSE was the highest (17.6%) among male university students in South Africa and the lowest (7.3%) among students in Singapore. Logistic regression found that TSE importance or positive attitude was highly associated with TSE practice. TSE practices were found to be inadequate and efforts should be made to develop programmes that can increase knowledge related to testicular cancer as well as the practice of testicular self-examination.

Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Technicians Working at Hospitals Towards Testicular Cancer and Self-examination of Testicles in Turkey

  • Ozturk, Ahmet;Unalan, Demet;Guleser, Gulsum Nihal
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.15 no.23
    • /
    • pp.10095-10099
    • /
    • 2015
  • Background: The present study was conducted to determine knowledge level of technicians working in hospitals about testicular cancer (TC) and self-examination of testicles (TSE) and to determine levels of consciousness and implementation status about TSE. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted with technicians working in hospitals (n=243) between $2^{nd}$ January-$31^{st}$ May 2012 at private and governmental hospitals in urban Kayseri. Healthy control subjects (n=235) who were similar to technicians in terms of age, education level and income status were also included to the study. Chi-square test was used in comparison of categorical variables. Results: Technicians were significantly more aware of TC than controls, but the latter were found to have significantly more information about TSE. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of knowing how to do TSE and 80% of both groups were unaware this exam. Of technicians, 19.8% and of controls, 25.5% did TSE, the difference being statistically insignificant. First reason for not doing TSE was "not-knowing" among technicians (48.1%) while it was "ignorance" among controls (66.8%). Of technicians doing TSE, 37.5% did as it came to their mind while 51.7% of controls performed TSE several times in the previous year. Technicians were significantly more afraid of getting TC than controls (p=0.037). Conclusions: It was determined in the present study that rates of TSE were similar between technicians and controls. However compliance with the recommended frequency and right method was low. Consequently, public health education should be planned and applied in order to increase the knowledge of TC and TSE.