• Title, Summary, Keyword: sweet potato latent virus

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First Report of Sweet potato latent virus and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus Isolated from Sweet Potato in Korea

  • Yun, W.S.;Lee, Y.H.;Kim, K.H.
    • The Plant Pathology Journal
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    • v.18 no.3
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    • pp.126-129
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    • 2002
  • Infected sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) showing symptoms of sunken veins, stunting, mosaic, and mottling were collected from Gimje, Cochang, Iksan, and Haenam provinces in Korea. Electron microscopic (EM) observation of the infected tissue revealed rod and filamentous rod type virus particles of various lengths. Western blot analysis of the protein samples extracted from infected sweet potato and partially purified virus identified the isolates as Sweet potato feathery motile virus (SPFMV), Sweet potato latent virus (SwPLV), and Sweet potato chlorotic stint virus (SPCSV). Sweet potatoes were occasionally infected with more than one of these viruses. This is the first report of SwPLV and SPCSV in Korea.

Antiserum Preparation of Recombinant Sweet Potato Latent Virus-Lotus (SPLV-Lotus) Coat Protein and Application for Virus-Infected Lotus Plant Detection

  • He, Zhen;Dong, Tingting;Chen, Wen;Wang, Tielin;Gan, Haifeng;Li, LiangJun
    • The Plant Pathology Journal
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    • v.36 no.6
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    • pp.651-657
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    • 2020
  • Lotus is one of the most important aquatic vegetables in China. Previously, we detected sweet potato latent virus from lotus (SPLV-lotus) and found that it has highly significant sequence diversity with SPLV-sweet potato isolates (SPLV-sp). Here, we developed serological methods for the detection of SPLV-lotus in Chinese lotus cultivation areas. Based on the high sensitivity of SPLV-lotus coat protein antiserum, rapid, sensitive and large-scale diagnosis methods of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot blot in lotus planting area were developed. The established ELISA and dot blot diagnostic methods can be used to detect SPLV-lotus from samples successfully. And our results also showed that the SPLV-lotus and sweet potato isolates appeared clearly distinction in serology. Our study provides a high-throughput, sensitive, and rapid diagnostic method based on serology that can detect SPLV on lotus, which is suggested to be included in viral disease management approach due to its good detection level.

The Current Incidence of Viral Disease in Korean Sweet Potatoes and Development of Multiplex RT-PCR Assays for Simultaneous Detection of Eight Sweet Potato Viruses

  • Kwak, Hae-Ryun;Kim, Mi-Kyeong;Shin, Jun-Chul;Lee, Ye-Ji;Seo, Jang-Kyun;Lee, Hyeong-Un;Jung, Mi-Nam;Kim, Sun-Hyung;Choi, Hong-Soo
    • The Plant Pathology Journal
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    • v.30 no.4
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    • pp.416-424
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    • 2014
  • Sweet potato is grown extensively from tropical to temperate regions and is an important food crop worldwide. In this study, we established detection methods for 17 major sweet potato viruses using single and multiplex RT-PCR assays. To investigate the current incidence of viral diseases, we collected 154 samples of various sweet potato cultivars showing virus-like symptoms from 40 fields in 10 Korean regions, and analyzed them by RT-PCR using specific primers for each of the 17 viruses. Of the 17 possible viruses, we detected eight in our samples. Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV) and sweet potato virus C (SPVC) were most commonly detected, infecting approximately 87% and 85% of samples, respectively. Furthermore, Sweet potato symptomless virus 1 (SPSMV-1), Sweet potato virus G (SPVG), Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV), Sweet potato virus 2 ( SPV2), Sweet potato chlorotic fleck virus (SPCFV), and Sweet potato latent virus (SPLV) were detected in 67%, 58%, 47%, 41%, 31%, and 20% of samples, respectively. This study presents the first documented occurrence of four viruses (SPVC, SPV2, SPCFV, and SPSMV-1) in Korea. Based on the results of our survey, we developed multiplex RT-PCR assays for simple and simultaneous detection of the eight sweet potato viruses we recorded.

Molecular Characterization of Five Potyviruses Infecting Korean Sweet Potatoes Based on Analyses of Complete Genome Sequences

  • Kwak, Hae-Ryun;Kim, Jaedeok;Kim, Mi-Kyeong;Seo, Jang-Kyun;Jung, Mi-Nam;Kim, Jeong-Soo;Lee, Sukchan;Choi, Hong-Soo
    • The Plant Pathology Journal
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    • v.31 no.4
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    • pp.388-401
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    • 2015
  • Sweet potatoes (Ipomea batatas L.) are grown extensively, in tropical and temperate regions, and are important food crops worldwide. In Korea, potyviruses, including Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), Sweet potato virus C (SPVC), Sweet potato virus G (SPVG), Sweet potato virus 2 (SPV2), and Sweet potato latent virus (SPLV), have been detected in sweet potato fields at a high (~95%) incidence. In the present work, complete genome sequences of 18 isolates, representing the five potyviruses mentioned above, were compared with previously reported genome sequences. The complete genomes consisted of 10,081 to 10,830 nucleotides, excluding the poly-A tails. Their genomic organizations were typical of the Potyvirus genus, including one target open reading frame coding for a putative polyprotein. Based on phylogenetic analyses and sequence comparisons, the Korean SPFMV isolates belonged to the strains RC and O with >98% nucleotide sequence identity. Korean SPVC isolates had 99% identity to the Japanese isolate SPVC-Bungo and 70% identity to the SPFMV isolates. The Korean SPVG isolates showed 99% identity to the three previously reported SPVG isolates. Korean SPV2 isolates had 97% identity to the SPV2 GWB-2 isolate from the USA. Korean SPLV isolates had a relatively low (88%) nucleotide sequence identity with the Taiwanese SPLV-TW isolates, and they were phylogenetically distantly related to SPFMV isolates. Recombination analysis revealed that possible recombination events occurred in the P1, HC-Pro and NIa-NIb regions of SPFMV and SPLV isolates and these regions were identified as hotspots for recombination in the sweet potato potyviruses.