• Title, Summary, Keyword: surfacant

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Electrophoretic Mobility to Monitor Protein-Surfacant Interactions

  • Hong, Soon-Taek
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.3 no.2
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    • pp.143-151
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    • 1998
  • Protein -surfactant interactions have been investigate by measuring ζ-potential of $\beta$-lactoglobulin-coated emulsion droplets and $\beta$-lactoglobulin in solution in the rpesenceof surfactant, with particular emphasis on the effect of protein heat treatment(7$0^{\circ}C$, 30min). When ionic surfactant (SDS or DATEM) is added to the protein solution, the ζ-potential of the mixture is found to increase with increasing surfactant concentration, indicating surfactant binding to the protein molecules. For heat-denatured protein,it has been observed that the ζ-potential tends to be lower than that of the native protein. The effect of surfactant on emulsions is rather complicated .With SDS, small amounts of surfactant addition induce a sharp increase in zeta potential arising from the specific interaction of surfactant with protein. With further surfacant addition, there is a gradual reductio in the ζ-potential, presumably caused by the displacement of adsorped protein (and protein-surfactant complex) from the emulsion droplet surfac by the excess of SDS molecules. At even higher surfactant concentrations, the measured zeta potential appears to increase slightly, possibly due to the formation of a surfactant measured zeta potential appears to increase slightly, possibly due to the formation of surfactant micellar structure at the oil droplet surface. This behaviour contrastswith the results of the corresponding systems containing the anionic emulsifier DATEM, in which the ζ-potential of the system is found to increase continuously with R, particularly at very low surfactant concentration. Overall, such behaviour is consisten with a combination of complexation and competitive displacement between surfactant and protein occurring at the oil-water interface. In addition, it has also been found that above the CMC, there is a time-dependent increase in the negative ζ-potential of emulsion droplets in solutions of SDS, possibly due to the solublization of oil droplets into surfactant micelles in the aqueous bulk phase.

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Partial Charge and CMC Characteristics of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Group of Surfactants (Cationic and Amphoteric Surfactant) (계면활성제의 친수.소수성 그룹의 부분전하와 CMC특성 (양이온 및 양쪽성 계면활성제))

  • 하윤식
    • Journal of Environmental Science International
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    • v.9 no.5
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    • pp.403-408
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    • 2000
  • On the basis of theory of Bratsch's electronegativity equalization the electronegativity equalization the group electronegativities and the group partial charges for cationic and amphoteric surface and amphoteric surfactants could be calculated using Pauling's electronegativity parameters. From calculated output we have investigated relationships between CMC(critical micelle concentration) and partial charge and group electronegativity of hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups structural stability of micelle for cationic and amphoteric surfactants. As a result CMC depends upon partial charge and electronegativity of hydrophilic group is decreased. With increasing the carbon number of hydrophilic group for cationic surfactant its partial charge is increased but CMC and its electronegativity are decreased. With increasing the carbon number of hydrophobic group for cationic and amphoteric surfactant its partial charge is increased but CMC andits electronegativity are decreased.

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Orthokinetic Stability of $\beta$-Lactoglubulin-Stabilized Emulsions : Effects of Protein Heat Treatment and Surfactant Addition

  • Hong, Soon-Taek
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.3 no.2
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    • pp.133-142
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    • 1998
  • Effects of protein heat treatment and surfactant additionoo the orthokindetic stability of $\beta$-lactoglobulin-stabilized emulsions have been investigated under turbulent flow conditions. In studies on protein-stabilized emulsions, samples which had been subjected to heat treatment(i.e. the protein solution orthe emulsion) have been found to be more prone to orthokinetic coalescene than the untreated ones. The emulsions stabilized with protein heated above the denaturation temperature(i.e. 7$0^{\circ}C$) showed the bigger initial average droplet size, which resulted in an increased orthokinetic coalescenece rate. The storage of the protein-stabilized emulsion at high temperature prior to the shearing experiment also made the emulsion less stable in the shear field. Interestingly. the addition of DATEM has been found to produce a substantial increase in orthokinetic stability of the heat-denatured protein-stabilized emulsion system, although Tween 20 is the opposite case.

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