• Title, Summary, Keyword: sunitinib

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Factors Prognostic for Survival in Japanese Patients Treated with Sunitinib as First-line Therapy for Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Cancer

  • Kawai, Y;Osawa, T;Kobayashi, K;Inoue, R;Yamamoto, Y;Matsumoto, H;Nagao, K;Hara, T;Sakano, S;Nagamori, S;Matsuyama, H
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.14
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    • pp.5687-5690
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    • 2015
  • Background: Factors predictive of survival have been identified in Western patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mCCRCC) treated with sunitinib. Less is known, however, about factors predictive of survival in Japanese patients. This study evaluated factors prognostic of survival in Japanese patients with mCCRCC treated with first-line sunitinib. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study evaluated 46 consecutive Japanese mCCRCC patients treated with sunitinib as first line therapy. Clinical and biochemical markers associated with progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed, with prognostic factors selected by uniand multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results: Univariate analysis showed that factors significantly associated with poor PFS included Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center poor risk scores, International Metastatic RCC Database Consortium poor risk and high (>0.5 mg/dl) serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations (p<0.001 each). Multivariate analysis showed that high serum CRP was independently associated with poorer PFS (p=0.040). Six month disease control rate (complete response, partial response and stable disease) in response to sunitinib was significantly higher in patients with normal (${\leq}0.5mg/dl$) than elevated baseline CRP (p<0.001). Conclusions: CRP is a significant independent predictor of PFS for Japanese patients with mCCRCC treated with first-line sunitinib. Pretreatment CRP concentration may be a useful biomarker predicting response to sunitinib treatment.

Utilization of Sunitinib for Renal Cell Cancer: an Egyptian University hospital experience

  • Ezz El Din, M
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.7
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    • pp.3161-3166
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    • 2016
  • Background: Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) status as poor prognosis improved with the introduction of tyrosine-kinase inhibitors, especially sunitinib. There is sparse data reporting from our region on use of sunitinib in metastatic RCC. Thus the present study explores sunitinib usage at our institute. Materials and Methods: An unselected population of patients with metastatic RCC receiving sunitinib was analyzed with respect to patient characteristics, response, toxicity, and outcomes. Results: Fourty-nine patients with a median age of 50.5 years (range 21-71 years) were included. Most were male (61.2%). Twenty‑one (42.9%) had metastatic disease at presentation. Sunitinib was first line therapy in 45. Conventional clear cell carcinoma was the most common pathology present (39 patients; 79.59 %). The most common site of metastasis was the lung (75.5%). Most patients (30) were started at a dose of 50 mg once a day for 4 weeks and then 2 weeks rest. Clinical benefit rate was 73.5% (n= 36), and 22.5% (n= 11) demonstrated progressive disease at first imaging evaluation within the first 3-6 months. The following objective response performed for patients was 48.9% (n=24) and progression at 24.5 % (n=12). The median follow‑up was 16 months (range, 4-34 months), the overall estimated median PFS was 9 months and the estimated median OS was 15 months. Conclusions: This study demonstrated sunitinib is tolerable and effective in advanced/metastatic RCC Egyptian patients and indicates we should further seek second and third lines to increase survival equivalence as reported in the worldwide literature.

Prognostic and Predictive Value of Hematologic Parameters in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Second Line Sunitinib Treatment Following IFN-alpha

  • Dirican, Ahmet;Kucukzeybek, Yuksel;Erten, Cigdem;Somali, Isil;Demir, Lutfiye;Can, Alper;Payzin, Kadriye Bahriye;Bayoglu, Ibrahim Vedat;Akyol, Murat;Yildiz, Yasar;Koseoglu, Mehmet;Alacacioglu, Ahmet;Tarhan, Mustafa Oktay
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.3
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    • pp.2101-2105
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    • 2013
  • Background: Long-term survival is a problem with locally advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinomas. Sunitinib malate is an oral multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, but data on sunitinib use as a second line treatment in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) are limited. Prognostic and predictive value of peripheral blood markers has been shown for many cancers. Materials and Methods: Efficacy and safety profiles of sunitinib after interferon alpha (IFN-${\alpha}$) were evaluated based on retrospective data for 23 patients with mRCC. Hematological parameters (neutrophils, lymphocytes, platelets, mean platelet volume, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, platelet/lymphocyte ratio) were recorded at the time of metastasis. It was evaluated whether hematological parameters were prognostic and predictive factors. Results: Median progression-free survival (PFS) time was 16.5 months (95%CI: 0-34.5). Median overall survival (OS) time was 25.7 months (95%CI: 10.8-40.0). Most common side effects were neutropenia (52.2%), stomatitis (26.1%) and hand-food syndrome (26.1%). PFS was found 3.13 vs 17.1 months in patients with neutrophil / lymphocyte ratio (NLR)>3 vs $NLR{\leq}3$ (p:0.012). Median OS was 6.96 vs 27.1 months in patients with NLR>3 vs $NLR{\leq}3$ (p:0.001).While 75% of patients who responded to sunitinib had $NLR{\leq}3$, in 72% of patients with no response to sunitinib NLR>3 was detected (p:0.036). The association between the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) criteria and NLR was statistically significant (p:0.022). Conclusions: Data on second line sunitinib treatment following cytokine in mRCC are limited. In our study, we observed second line sunitinib treatment following IFN-${\alpha}$ to be effective and tolerable. NLRappeared to have prognostic and predictive value.

Efficacy and Toxicity of Sunitinib in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients in Egypt

  • Edesa, Wael Abdelgawad;Abdelmalek, Raafat Ragaey
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.5
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    • pp.1971-1976
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    • 2015
  • Background: To evaluate our results in terms of response, survival and toxicity profile of sunitinib among Egyptian patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Between January 2010 and December 2013, 44 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who received sunitinib at an oncology center of Cairo university hospitals were enrolled in this retrospective analysis. Results: The median age of the patients was 53 years, 22 (50%) having localized disease at presentation, while the remaining half of the patients presented with metastasis. At a median follow up of 19 months, 9 (21%) patients achieved partial remission, while disease was reported stable in 20 cases (45%) and progressive in 7 (16%), 4 (9%) being lost to follow up, and 4 (9%) had discontinued therapy due to toxicity. The median overall survival was 23 months (95%CI 15.2 - 30.9), while progression free survival was 12 months (95%CI 11.6 - 12.3). The most commonly reported non hematological grade 3 adverse events included mucositis (15.9%), hand-foot syndrome (13.6%), and fatigue (9%), while the predominant grade 3 or 4 laboratory abnormalities were neutropenia (6.8%), followed by anemia in 4.5% of patients. Conclusions: Our efficacy data were comparable to the published literature in terms of progression free survival and overall survival, while toxicity profile is different from Asian and western countries. However, sunitinib adverse events were manageable and tolerable in most of our Egyptian patients.

Targeting Renal Cell Carcinoma with Gambogic Acid in Combination with Sunitinib in Vitro and in Vivo

  • Jiang, Xiao-Liang;Zhang, Yao;Luo, Chun-Li;Wu, Xiao-Hou
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.12
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    • pp.6463-6468
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    • 2012
  • Purpose: To evaluated the effect of the gambogic acid (GA), one of the effective components of Garcinia, in combination with a new multi-targeted oral medication, sunitinib (SU) on renal cancer cell proliferation in vitro and on tumor growth in vivo. Methods: After treatment with GA or SU, either alone or in combination, MTT and FACS analysis were used to examine cell viability and cycle distribution of the renal carcinoma cell lines 786-0 and Caki-1. Western blotting was employed to examine the expression of proteins related to the cell cycle and vascular formation. Furthermore, a xenograft model was applied to study the antitumor efficacy of SU or GA alone or in combination, with immunohistochemistry to detect expression of proteins related to xenograft growth and angiogenesis. Western blotting was used to examine NF-${\kappa}B$ signaling pathway elements in xenografts. Results: Treatment of 786-0 and Caki-1 cells with GA or SU resulted in decreased tumor cell proliferation, especially with joint use. Cells accumulated more strongly in the sub-G1 phase after joint treatment with GA and SU than treatment of GA and SU alone. Western blotting arrays showed 1 protein significantly upregulated, 2 proteins downregulated, and 2 proteins unchanged. Moreover, combined use of GA and SU inhibited the growth and angiogenesis of xenografts generated from Caki-1 significantly. Immunohistochemistry arrays showed downregulation of the expression of proteins promoting xenograft growth and angiogenesis, and Western blotting showed inhibition of the NF-${\kappa}B$ signaling pathway after treatment by GA alone and in combination with SU in xenografts. Conclusions: Our results show that the joint use of GA and SU can provide greater antitumor efficacy compared to either drug alone and thus may offer a new treatment strategy for renal cell carcinoma.

Efficacy and Safety of Regorafenib in Korean Patients with Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor after Failure of Imatinib and Sunitinib: A Multicenter Study Based on the Management Access Program

  • Son, Myoung Kyun;Ryu, Min-Hee;Park, Joon Oh;Im, Seock-Ah;Kim, Tae-Yong;Lee, Su Jin;Ryoo, Baek-Yeol;Park, Sook Ryun;Kang, Yoon-Koo
    • Cancer Research and Treatment
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    • v.49 no.2
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    • pp.350-357
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    • 2017
  • Purpose The aim of this study was to confirm the efficacy and safety of regorafenib for advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) reported in the GRID phase III trial in Korean patients. Materials and Methods Fifty-seven Korean patients with advanced GIST who experienced both imatinib and sunitinib failure were enrolled in the management access program between December 2012 and November 2013 and treated with regorafenib (160 mg orally once daily in a 3 weeks on/1 week off). Results None of the patients achieved a complete or partial response while 25 patients (44%) showed stable disease for ${\geq}12$ weeks. With a median follow-up of 12.7 months (range, 0.2 to 27.6 months), the median progression-free survival and overall survival were 4.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.8 to 5.3) and 12.9 months (95% CI, 8.1 to 17.7), respectively. Interestingly, 15 patients (26%) experienced an exacerbation of their cancer-related symptoms (abdominal pain in eight and abdominal distension in five) during the rest period for regorafenib, but all were ameliorated upon the resumption of regorafenib. The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse event was a hand-foot skin reaction (25%). The regorafenib dose was reduced in 44 patients (77%) due to toxicity, which manifested mainly as a hand-foot skin reaction (n=31). Conclusion This study confirmed the efficacy and safety of regorafenib for advanced GIST after imatinib and sunitinib failure in Korean patients. Considering the exacerbation of the cancer-related symptoms observed during the rest periods, further exploration of the continuous dosing schedule of regorafenib is warranted in future clinical trials.

Efficacy of First-Line Targeted Therapy in Real-World Korean Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Focus on Sunitinib and Pazopanib

  • Kim, Myung Soo;Chung, Ho Seok;Hwang, Eu Chang;Jung, Seung Il;Kwon, Dong Deuk;Hwang, Jun Eul;Bae, Woo Kyun;Park, Jae Young;Jeong, Chang Wook;Kwak, Cheol;Song, Cheryn;Seo, Seong Il;Byun, Seok-Soo;Hong, Sung-Hoo;Chung, Jinsoo
    • Journal of Korean Medical Science
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    • v.33 no.51
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    • pp.325.1-325.10
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    • 2018
  • Background: To evaluate survival outcomes and prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) who received sunitinib (SU) and pazopanib (PZ) as first-line therapy in real-world Korean clinical practice. Methods: Data of 554 patients with mRCC who received SU or PZ at eight institutions between 2012 and 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Based on the targeted therapy, the patients were divided into SU (n = 293) or PZ (n = 261) groups, and the clinicopathological variables and survival rates of the two groups were compared. A multivariable Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the prognostic factors for OS. Results: The median follow-up was 16.4 months (interquartile range, 8.3-31.3). Patients in the PZ group were older, and no significant difference was observed in the performance status (PS) between the two groups. In the SU group, the dose reduction rate was higher and the incidence of grade 3 toxicity was more frequent. The objective response rates were comparable between the two groups (SU, 32.1% vs. PZ, 36.4%). OS did not differ significantly between the two groups (SU, 36.5 months vs. PZ, 40.2 months; log-rank, P = 0.955). Body mass index, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group PS > 2, synchronous metastasis, poor Heng risk criteria, and liver and bone metastases were associated with a shorter OS. Conclusion: Our real-world data of Korean patients with mRCC suggested that SU and PZ had similar efficacies as first-line therapy for mRCC. However, PZ was better tolerated than SU in Korean patients.

EGF Induced RET Inhibitor Resistance in CCDC6-RET Lung Cancer Cells

  • Chang, Hyun;Sung, Ji Hea;Moon, Sung Ung;Kim, Han-Soo;Kim, Jin Won;Lee, Jong Seok
    • Yonsei Medical Journal
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    • v.58 no.1
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    • pp.9-18
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    • 2017
  • Purpose: Rearrangement of the proto-oncogene rearranged during transfection (RET) has been newly identified potential driver mutation in lung adenocarcinoma. Clinically available tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) target RET kinase activity, which suggests that patients with RET fusion genes may be treatable with a kinase inhibitor. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of resistance to these agents remain largely unknown. Thus, the present study aimed to determine whether epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) trigger RET inhibitor resistance in LC-2/ad cells with CCDC6-RET fusion genes. Materials and Methods: The effects of EGF and HGF on the susceptibility of a CCDC6-RET lung cancer cell line to RET inhibitors (sunitinib, E7080, vandetanib, and sorafenib) were examined. Results: CCDC6-RET lung cancer cells were highly sensitive to RET inhibitors. EGF activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and triggered resistance to sunitinib, E7080, vandetanib, and sorafenib by transducing bypass survival signaling through ERK and AKT. Reversible EGFR-TKI (gefitinib) resensitized cancer cells to RET inhibitors, even in the presence of EGF. Endothelial cells, which are known to produce EGF, decreased the sensitivity of CCDC6-RET lung cancer cells to RET inhibitors, an effect that was inhibited by EGFR small interfering RNA (siRNA), anti-EGFR antibody (cetuximab), and EGFR-TKI (Iressa). HGF had relatively little effect on the sensitivity to RET inhibitors. Conclusion: EGF could trigger resistance to RET inhibition in CCDC6-RET lung cancer cells, and endothelial cells may confer resistance to RET inhibitors by EGF. E7080 and other RET inhibitors may provide therapeutic benefits in the treatment of RET-positive lung cancer patients.

Skull Metastasis of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Successfully Managed by Surgery

  • Park, Inkeun;Chung, Dong Hae;Yoo, Chan Jong;Shin, Dong Bok
    • Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society
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    • v.60 no.1
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    • pp.94-97
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    • 2017
  • Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare, but are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. The most common sites of metastasis are liver and peritoneum, while bone metastasis is rare. We report on a patient with skull metastasis after seven years of treatment with imatinib for metastatic GIST. She underwent metastasectomy consisting of craniectomy with excision of the mass, and cranioplasty and continued treatment with imatinib and sunitinib, without evidence of cranial recurrence. She died of pneumonia sepsis one year after metastasectomy. Skull metastasis of GIST is a very rare presentation, and an aggressive multidisciplinary approach should be considered whenever possible.

A rare case of osteonecrosis of the jaw related to imatinib

  • Viviano, Massimo;Rossi, Marco;Cocca, Serena
    • Journal of the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
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    • v.43 no.2
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    • pp.120-124
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    • 2017
  • Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is commonly described as an adverse effect of the use of bisphosphonates. A few cases of ONJ associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (sunitinib, imatinib) have been reported in the literature and usually they occurred in patients simultaneously treated with bisphosphonates. We report an atypical case of ONJ related only to imatinib. A 72-year-old male patient was treated with imatinib for metastases from gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The patient developed ONJ after 22 months of imatinib only therapy. During his whole life, the patient had never been treated with bisphosphonates or radiotherapy. Microscope examination of the tissues confirmed the clinical diagnosis of diffuse osteonecrosis and showed absence of neoplastic cells. Thus, secondary localisations from GISTs were ruled out. Osteonecrosis of the lower jaw appeared 22 months after initial and exclusive therapy with imatinib. Therefore, imatinib monotherapy can induce ONJ in patients that have never been treated with bisphosphonates or radiotherapy.