• Title, Summary, Keyword: quitline

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Taiwan Report on Quitline Activities

  • Hsu, Pei-Ting;Chang, Chia-Wen;Chang, Te-Chung
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.sup2
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    • pp.11-18
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    • 2016
  • Aiming at reducing smoking population, Taiwan government adopted a successful smoking cessation quitline model from California Smokers' Helpline, commissioned a private non-profit organization-Teacher Chang Foundation, which was well-known for its quality telephone counseling service-to set up Asia's first quitline, Taiwan Smokers' Helpline (TSH) in 2003. The establishment of the quitline is a significant progress for tobacco control in Taiwan, as it built up a cooperative model with smoking cessation clinics to increase the quit rate through assisting smokers to overcome their psychological obstacles while quitting smoking.

Quitline Activity in China

  • Wang, Jijiang;Nan, Yi;Yang, Yan;Jiang, Yuan
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.sup2
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    • pp.7-9
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    • 2016
  • In order to help smokers quit easier, China has started to provide quitline service since 2004. There are two models for Chinese quitline service-the National Quitline Model, which provides only cessation service to smokers, and the 12320 Hotline Model, which integrates cessation counseling into public health hotline service and is currently adapted in public health hotlines in 28 provinces. A protocol of 4 counseling calls is used by 12320 Hotline. Three-month abstinence rate for clients is about 20%. The fact that most smokers who attempted quit don't seek cessation help or quitline service is not well known by the public are major constraints for quitline service in China. Effective advocating campaign should be implemented to propagate quitline. Diverse protocols targeting different subpopulation will also need to be developed to better service the public.

Quitline Activity in the Republic of Korea

  • Yun, E Hwa;Lim, Min Kyung;Oh, Jin-Kyoung;Ki, In Ha;Shin, Sang-Hwa;Jeong, Bo Yoon
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.sup2
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    • pp.1-5
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    • 2016
  • To reduce tobacco use and related harm in Korea, telephone based cessation services (Quitlines) began full operation to provide regular behavioral counseling for smoking cessation in 2006. After registration in the cessation program, at least 21 calls per year are given to each client to help quit and encourage maintenance. Tailored programs for males, females, and adolescent smokers have been offered taking into account smokers' characteristics and smoking behavior. Mailing self-help quit packs and e-mail and SMS services are allowable as additional services.A total of 23,201 smokers were registered on the Quitline program from 2006 to 2014. In 2014, an average of 13,343 calls per month have been received by 28 coaches, the 1 year abstinence rate of clients is 26%, and clients' satisfaction rate is 81.6%. After introduction of the call system in 2007, client convenience and effective operations have been achieved with high technology support of a computer-based telephone system. Systematic education and evaluation programs for quit coaches have contributed to quality assurance of the services. Currently, research into development of new programs and evaluation of Quitline performance is being undertaken. A Comprehensive Multi-channel Cessation Center (CMCC) has been suggested and is now planned as a next step in the national program for smoking cessation.

Quitline Activity in Rajasthan, India

  • Gupta, Rakesh;Verma, Vinit;Mathur, Pankaj
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.sup2
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    • pp.19-24
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    • 2016
  • Quitline activity in Rajasthan, India is a voluntary activity of Rajasthan Cancer Foundation (RCF) since April 2013. To kick-off, it took the benefit of the State Government- PIRAMAL SWASTHYA (PS)1 collaborative 104 Health Information Helpline that existed already in public-private partnership. It is a reactive quitline that helps callers through the counselors and nursing staff trained specifically through the weekly sessions held by the first author, the RCF resource on quitline. Besides structuring of the scripts for primary intervention and follow-ups after 1 week, 1 month, 6 months and a year, he also monitors calls, advices and coordinates with the supervisors to manage and analyze the data base, and reports to the PS lead at the Jaipur Center on overall performance and to plan strategic communication with the State Government on its outcomes. The quitline has limitations of its informal existence through a voluntary effort of RCF, no specific resource allocation, suboptimal data management, minimal awareness in the masses due to poor IEC (Information, Education and Communication; except its efforts made by RCF in last 1 year through the government-run State TV and City Radio) and staff shortage and its attrition due to lack of plan for career advancement. Despite these challenges in the year 2013, the quit line has registered a quit rate (for complete abstinence) of 19.93% amongst 1525 callers. The quit rate were 58.01% (304/ 524) among the responders at the 3rd follow-up at 18 months (in September 2014)2. In view of an increase in quit rate by 5- 9 times over the prevailing quit rate in the former ever daily users [both smokers and the users of smokeless tobacco (SLT)], efforts are being made by RCF in concurrence with PS to have this cost-effective model established formally with optimal resource allocation in collaboration with willing agencies (the State and Central Governments and the International Quitline Agencies) and its replication in 4 more states where PS is collaborating with the respective state governments similarly (Assam, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand and Karnataka).

The Status and Future Challenges of Tobacco Control Policy in Korea

  • Cho, Hong-Jun
    • Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
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    • v.47 no.3
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    • pp.129-135
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    • 2014
  • Tobacco use is the most important preventable risk factor for premature death. The World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), the first international public health treaty, came into force in 2005. This paper reviews the present status of tobacco control policies in Korea according to the WHO FCTC recommendations. In Korea, cigarette use is high among adult males (48.2% in 2010), and cigarette prices are the lowest among the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries with no tax increases since 2004. Smoke-free policies have shown incremental progress since 1995, but smoking is still permitted in many indoor public places. More than 30% of non-smoking adults and adolescents are exposed to second-hand smoke. Public education on the harmful effects of tobacco is currently insufficient and the current policies have not been adequately evaluated. There is no comprehensive ban on tobacco advertising, promotion, or sponsorship in Korea. Cigarette packages have text health warnings on only 30% of the main packaging area, and misleading terms such as "mild" and "light" are permitted. There are nationwide smoking cessation clinics and a Quitline service, but cessation services are not covered by public insurance schemes and there are no national treatment guidelines. The sale of tobacco to minors is prohibited by law, but is poorly enforced. The socioeconomic inequality of smoking prevalence has widened, although the government considers inequality reduction to be a national goal. The tobacco control policies in Korea have faltered recently and priority should be given to the development of comprehensive tobacco control policies.