• Title, Summary, Keyword: phylogeography

Search Result 15, Processing Time 0.035 seconds

Phylogeography and Population Genetic Structure of Amur Grayling Thymallus grubii in the Amur Basin

  • Ma, Bo;Lui, Tingting;Zhang, Ying;Chen, Jinping
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
    • /
    • v.25 no.7
    • /
    • pp.935-944
    • /
    • 2012
  • Amur grayling, Thymallus grubii, is an important economic cold freshwater fish originally found in the Amur basin. Currently, suffering from loss of habitat and shrinking population size, T. grubii is restricted to the mountain river branches of the Amur basin. In order to assess the genetic diversity, population genetic structure and infer the evolutionary history within the species, we analysised the whole mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) of 95 individuals from 10 rivers in China, as well as 12 individuals from Ingoda/Onon and Bureya River throughout its distribution area. A total of 64 variable sites were observed and 45 haplotypes were identified excluding sites with gaps/missing data. Phylogenetic analysis was able to confidently predict two subclade topologies well supported by maximum-parsimony and Bayesian methods. However, basal branching patterns cannot be unambiguously estimated. Haplotypes from the mitochondrial clades displayed local homogeneity, implying a strong population structure within T. grubii. Analysis of molecular variance detected significant differences among the different geographical rivers, suggesting that T. grubii in each river should be managed and conserved separately.

Phylogeography of the Lessonia variegata species complex (Phaeophyceae, Laminariales) in New Zealand

  • Zuccarello, Giuseppe C.;Martin, Peter
    • ALGAE
    • /
    • v.31 no.2
    • /
    • pp.91-103
    • /
    • 2016
  • A goal of phylogeography is to relate phylogenetic patterns to potential historic and contemporary geographic isolating events. Genetic breaks found in phylogeographic studies may denote boundaries between more generally applicable biogeographic regions. We investigated the distribution of Lessonia variegata, an important habitat forming alga, found on most rocky shores around New Zealand’s main islands, plus related species from surrounding waters. L. variegata has been shown to consist of four distinct cryptic species. Our aim was to compare the distribution of L. variegata with proposed bioregions; and to develop phylogeographic hypotheses to explain its present day distribution. Both a mitochondrial (atp8-sp) and plastid (RuBisCo spacer) marker, with different mutation rates, were used to gain information of the phylogenetic history of Lessonia. The data revealed high phylogeographic structuring and reciprocal endemism for all L. variegata cryptic species. One species (L. variegata / N) is confined to the northern part of the North Island of New Zealand; L. variegata / W is found at the southeast of the North Island and the northern South Island; L. variegata / K is endemic to the northeast South Island; and L. variegata / S is restricted to the southern part of the South Island. No overlapping areas of L. variegata species distribution were found. The data showed that genetic breaks in Lessonia do mostly correlate to bioregions, and highlight the importance of Cape Campbell at the northeast of the South Island and East Cape in the North Island, well known phylogeographic breaks, as a barrier between adjacent species.

Seed collection strategies for plant restoration with the aid of neutral genetic diversity

  • CHUNG, Mi Yoon;SON, Sungwon;MAO, Kangshan;LOPEZ-PUJOL, Jordi;CHUNG, Myong Gi
    • Korean Journal of Plant Taxonomy
    • /
    • v.49 no.4
    • /
    • pp.275-281
    • /
    • 2019
  • One key step in the plant restoration process is the collection of seeds from the field. For the selection of source populations of target plant species for translocation purposes (reintroduction or reinforcements), several approaches are possible. A practical method involves the use of data from reciprocal transplant studies. If no direct data are available, knowledge of population genetics and the phylogeography of the target species can serve as an alternative. In this short review, we briefly propose guidelines for those collecting seeds for plant species restoration based on population genetics theory, focusing on two main questions: Where does the plant material come from and how are sources designated, and how are seeds efficiently collected from local populations? While genetic data on a larger scale (phylogeography and population genetics) are needed to form a reply to the first question, similar data on a smaller scale (fine-scale genetic structures within populations) are necessary to shed light on the second issue.

Studies on Biological Diversity of Firefly in Japan

  • Suzuki, Hirobumi
    • International Journal of Industrial Entomology
    • /
    • v.2 no.2
    • /
    • pp.91-105
    • /
    • 2001
  • Taxonomic and phylogenetic studies of firefly in Japan have been reviewed. Fourty-six lampyrid species and one rhagophthalmid are distributed in the Japanese Islands including the Ryukyus. Recently, molecular phylogenetic approaches have been employed in the systematic study of firefly using mitochondrial and luciferase genes. Based on the molecular phylogenetic trees, evolutionary process of flashing patterns related strictly to mating behavior was estimated. Furthermore, genetic diversity studies revealed geographic differentiation patterns within species, and conservation measures of firefly were proposed to protect genetic resources endemic to the localities.

  • PDF

Intraspecific sequence variation of trnL/F intergenic region (cpDNA) in Sedum takesimense Nakai (Crassulaceae) and aspects of geographic distribution (섬기린초에서 엽록체 DNA 염기서열의 종내 변이와 지리적 분포 양상 연구)

  • Lee, Woong;Pak, Jae-Hong
    • Korean Journal of Plant Taxonomy
    • /
    • v.40 no.3
    • /
    • pp.157-162
    • /
    • 2010
  • Sequences of the trnL/F intergenic spacer of chloroplast DNA were used to investigate the intraspecific evoution and phylogeography of Sedum takesimense (Crassulaceae). The trnL/F intergeneric spacer sequences from 32 individuals of S. takesimense were either 291 bp (17 samples "without indel" in the following) or 297 bp (15samples "with indel 1") in length due to an indel of 6 bp. Two main cpDNA haplotypes were detected within S. takesimense. The haplotype with indel was found on Ulleung Island and without indel on Ulleung Island and Dok Island. This confirmed the existence of two cpDNA lineages with different geographical distributions. The cpDNA sequence analysis also suggested a putative long-distance dispersal event between Ulleung Island and Dok Island.

Historical Introduction of Japanese Wild Mice, Mus musculus, from South China and the Korean Peninsula

  • Nunome, Mitsuo;Suzuki, Hitoshi;Moriwaki, Kazuo
    • Animal Systematics, Evolution and Diversity
    • /
    • v.29 no.4
    • /
    • pp.267-271
    • /
    • 2013
  • In Japan, the wild house mouse Mus musculus consists of two lineages, one from Southeast Asia (Mus musculus castaneus; CAS) and one from northern Eurasia (Mus musculus musculus; MUS). However, the exact origins of the parental lineages are unclear. A recent work using mitochondrial sequences revealed that Japanese CAS and MUS are closely related to haplotypes from South China and the Korean Peninsula, respectively. Recent phylogeographic analyses using nuclear gene sequences have also confirmed a close relationship between Japan and Korea in the MUS component. However, the Japanese CAS components in the nuclear genome are likely to be unique and to differ from those of other CAS territories, including South China. Although the origins are still unresolved, these results allow us to conclude that two areas of the continent, South China and the Korean Peninsula, are the primary source areas of Japanese wild mice and suggest pre-historical introductions associated with certain historical agricultural developments in East Asia.

9th Indo-Pacific Fish Conference Review

  • Gwak, Woo-Seok
    • Korean Journal of Ichthyology
    • /
    • v.25 no.3
    • /
    • pp.182-184
    • /
    • 2013
  • The 9th Indo-Pacific Fish Conference (IPFC9) was held in Okinawa, Japan from 24th to 28th June 2013. Five hundred and thirty two delegates from 36 countries/regions around the world attended. The Conference took place with a welcome address by Dr. Keiichi Matsuura in the Laguna Garden Hotel next to the Okinawa Convention Center in the evening of 23rd June 2013, one day before the official start of the IPFC9. The winners of the two IPFC9 Bleeker Awards, Jeffrey M. Leis (Ecology) and Gerald R. Allen (Systematics) provided excellent talks on "Change in the early life-history of Indo-Pacific Fishes" and "The center of Indo-Pacific reef fish diversity". A total of 462 papers were presented, including 328 oral and 134 poster presentations. The main themes of IPFC9 included systematics, evolution, zoogeography and phylogeography, biodiversity, ecology, behavior, and conservation. There were 14 symposia, which included topics such as "Top predatory fish in the Indo-Pacific ecosystems", "Fish diversity across environmental extremes", "Ontogeny and systematics of Indo-Pacific fishes", and "Phylogenetics and diversification of the Percomorpha". IPFC10 will be held in Papeete, Tahiti.

Molecular phylogeny of Astilbe: Implications for phylogeography and morphological evolution (노루오줌속(Astilbe)의 분자 계통: 계통지리 및 형질 진화에 대한 고찰)

  • Kim, Sang-Yong;Kim, Sung-Hee;Shin, Hyunchur;Kim, Young-Dong
    • Korean Journal of Plant Taxonomy
    • /
    • v.39 no.1
    • /
    • pp.35-41
    • /
    • 2009
  • Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) is a genus well known for its disjunctive distribution in Asia and eastern North America. In this study, we reconstructed a molecular phylogeny of the genus using the sequences of ITS regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA. A total of 17 species representing major lineage of Astilbe and closely related taxa were included in the phylogenetic analyses. We obtained a Bayesian phylogenetic tree in which Saxifragopsis was positioned as a sister group to Astilbe. The Japanese endemic species, A.platyphylla was the most basal lineage within the genus. This species is well known for its distinct morphological features such as unisexual flowers, apetaly, and calyx with 7-11 lobes. Two species, A. biternata, a New World representative of the genus, and A. rivularis widely distributed in S. Asia, branched off early in the evolution of Astilbe. The remaining species formed a strongly supported core clade, which diverged into two robust geographical lineages: the first ("Japonica" clade) of species distributed in Japan, Taiwan, and Philippines and the other ("Rubra" clade), of taxa in China and Korea. The ITS phylogeny indicates that the Bering land bridges were the major route for the origin and dispersal of A. biternata. The two Taiwanese taxa and A. philippinensis were found to derive from the Japanese member, as the genus advanced southwards. The ITS phylogeny suggests that apetaly originated independently at least two times within the genus. Our results do not support Engler's classification system of the genus based on the leaf type (simple vs. compound), but reaffirm Hara's taxonomic idea which primarily considered the features of calyx.

Phylogeographic and Feeding Ecological Effects on the Mustelid Faunal Assemblages in Japan

  • Sato, Jun J.
    • Animal Systematics, Evolution and Diversity
    • /
    • v.29 no.2
    • /
    • pp.99-114
    • /
    • 2013
  • Phylogeographic and feeding ecological studies of seven terrestrial mustelid species (Carnivora, Mustelidae), the Japanese marten Martes melampus, the sable Martes zibellina, the Japanese badger Meles anakuma, the ermine or the stoat Mustela erminea, the Japanese weasel Mustela itatsi, the least weasel Mustela nivalis, and the Siberian weasel Mustela sibirica, representing four biogeographic patterns in the Japanese archipelagos (Hokkaido, Honshu-Shikoku-Kyushu, Tsushima, and Hokkaido-Honshu), were reviewed in order to clarify causes for the faunal assemblage processes of those mustelid species in Japan. Here, three main constraints were extracted as important factors on the mustelid assemblage. First, fundamental evolutionary differences maintained by niche conservatism in each ecologically diversified lineage ("evolutionary constraint") would enable the species to co-occur without any major problem (coexistence among Martes, Meles, and Mustela species). Second, "ecological constraints" would force two closely related species to be allopatric by competitive exclusion (Mu. itatsi and Mu. sibirica) or to be sympatric by resource partitions (Mu. erminea and Mu. nivalis). Third and most importantly, "geological constraints" would allow specific species to be embraced by a particular geographic region, primarily deciding which species co-occurs. The allopatric distribution of two Martes species in Japan would have been established by the strong effect of the geological separation in Tsugaru Strait. Elucidating both phylogeny and ecology of co-existing species in a community assemblage is important to know which species possess distinct lineage and which ecological traits are adapted to local environments, fulfilling the requirement of the field of conservation biology that endemism and adaptation should both be considered. The Japanese archipelagos would, therefore, provide valuable insight into the conservation for small carnivoran species.