• Title, Summary, Keyword: phenolic acids

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Phenolic Acids and Antioxidant Activities of Wild Ginseng (Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer) Leaves

  • Seog, Ho-Moon;Jung, Chang-Hwa;Kim, Yoon-Sook;Park, Hyeon-Suk
    • Food Science and Biotechnology
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    • v.14 no.3
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    • pp.371-374
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    • 2005
  • The compositions and antioxidant activities of tree and hydrolyzed phenolic acids, which are aglycones of esterified phenolic acids, in wild ginseng leaves were investigated. The contents of tree and hydrolyzed phenolic acids in the wild ginseng leaves were $422.4\;{\pm}\;3.5$ and $319.6\;{\pm}\;5.7\;mg/100\;g$, respectively, as gallic acid equivalents. Free phenolic acids were composed of 55.3% benzoic acid derivatives and 44.6% phenylpropanoids. The major constituents of free phenolic acids in the ginseng leaves were syringic (139.4 mg/l00 g) and sinapic (131.2 mg/100 g) acids. On the other hand, hydrolyzed phenolic acids in the ginseng leaves were mainly composed of caffeic (59.4 mg/100 g), ferulic (49.5 mg/100 g), and p-coumaric (33.8 mg/100g) acids. Phenylpropanoid content was higher (82.7%) than benzoic acid derivatives (17.3%). $IC_{50}$ values of DPPH radical scavenging activity were $10.2\;{\mu}g/mL$ for tree phenolic acids and 8.0 mg/mL for hydrolyzed phenolic acids, as gallic acid equivalents. Hydrolyzed phenolic acids also exhibited higher hydroxyl and superoxide radical scavenging activities than free phenolic acids did. These results indicated that the antioxidant activities of the wild ginseng leaves were correlated more closely with phenylpropanoid contents than with total amount of phenolics.

Desorption of Food Related Phenolic Acids from Charcoal in Single Solute Model System

  • Lee, Won-Young;Park, Yong-Hee
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.2 no.4
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    • pp.316-320
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    • 1997
  • Phenolic acids are regarded as harmful materials in food and environment science but recently, as useful materials, and thus adsorption is recommended as an effective separation technique to recover or remove phenolic acids from diluted solution. If the adsorbed phenolic compounds were useful materials, the materials should be recovered through desorption. Desorption using supercritical carbon dioxide(SC-$CO_2$) was tried to separate food-borne phenolic acids from charcoal in single solute system. In the comparisons of desorption amounts, gallic acid had the lowest lolubiligy to SC-$CO_2$. Gallic acid has more hydroxy functional groups than the other phenolic acids, which was immiscible with nonpolar SC-$CO_2$. Ferulic acid was yielded more than p-coumaric acid, because ferulic acid had much bigger molecular weight, which was affected more by van der Waas force. It was found that the most affecting factor on desorption amounts was the solubility of phenolic acids to SC-$CO_2$. The second affecting factor was van der Waals force. Response surface methodology(RSM) was conducted to read the trend of desorption. Increasing density of SC-$CO_2$ raised solubility of phenolic acids.

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The Physical Properties of Wheat Flour Extrudates with Added Phenolic Acids (페놀산 첨가 밀가루 압출성형물의 물리적 특성)

  • Koh, Bong-Kyung
    • Journal of the East Asian Society of Dietary Life
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    • v.17 no.3
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    • pp.379-383
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    • 2007
  • The effects of phenolic acids on the physical properties of wheat flour extrudate were investigated. Ferulic acid, fumaric acid, and p-coumaric acid were mixed with hard wheat flour, respectively, and extruded under a twin screw extruder. We found that by adding the phenolic acids, longitudinal expansion at the die increased, textural hardness decreased, and the water absorption capacity of the extrudate decreased. The results showed that the addition of phenolic acids produced a softer textured, more longitudinally puffed and hydrophobic extrudate compared to the control extrudate. Moreover, the addition of phenolic acids did not significantly affect the color of the extrudate: oxidative browning of the phenolic acids was not observed, due to inactivation of the browning enzymes under the hot temperature and reduced oxygen conditions of the extrusion process.

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Effect of Phenolic Acids on Inhibition of Browning of Maillard Reaction Model Solutions (Phenolic acid가 Maillard 반응 모델액의 갈변억제에 미치는 영향)

  • Kwak, Eun-Jung;Lim, Seong-Il
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
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    • v.39 no.1
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    • pp.20-24
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    • 2007
  • The effects of phenolic acids on inhibition of browning by the Maillard reaction were investigated with a glucose-glutamic acid model for doenjang with citric acid as the antibrowning agent and phenolic acid as its synergist. Five phenolic acids, cinnamic, coumaric, caffeic, hydroxybenzoic, and protocatechuic acids, were used. In order to investigate the antibrowning capacity, 0.1M glucose, 0.1M glutamic acid, 50mM citric acid, and 1mM phenolic acid were dissolved in 1M phosphate buffer (pH 7.0), heated at $50^{\circ}C$ for 24hr in the presence of 0.2mM $FeCl_{2}$, and stored at $4^{\circ}C$ or $30^{\circ}C$ for four weeks. Phenolic acid addition more efficiently inhibited browning during storage at $30^{\circ}C$ than at $4^{\circ}C$, without changes in pH. Hydroxybenzoic acid was the most efficient and increased the antibrowning capacity by 13% compared to sample without phenolic acids. Although caffeic and protocatechuic acids inhibited most the formation of 3-deoxyglucosone or fluorescence, they increased browning by forming colored complexes between two hydroxy groups of phenolic acids and iron ions. Hydroxybenzoic acid will be able to be a useful synergist of citric acid, an antibrowning agent in doenjang, since it is permitted for doenjang.

Antioxidative Effectiveness of Methanol Extract in Galla Rhois (오배자(Rhus japonica Linne) Methanol 추출물의 황산화효과)

  • 김태철;이기동;윤형식
    • Journal of Food Hygiene and Safety
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    • v.7 no.2
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    • pp.107.1-112
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    • 1992
  • Free-, soluble- and insoluble phenolic acids were extracted from defatted Galla Rhois. The extracts were then dissolved in equal amounts of an soybean oil, and POV (peroxide value) of the resulting substrates, portion of the soybean oil (control) and 0.02% BHT were measured by AOM (active oxygen method) test at 97.8$^{\circ}C$ for 40 hours through Rancimat method. Induction period of control, BHT, free phenolic acids, soluble phenolic acids and insoluble phenolic acids by the Rancimat method were 4.8, 10.5, 23.9 and 30.5hr. The phenolic acids separated and tentati-vely identified by gas chromatography were catechol, gallic acid, vanillin, protocatechuic acid, syri-ngic acid, ferulic acid.

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Analysis of Phenolic Acids in Tobacco Leaf by GC/MS (GC/MS에 의한 잎담배중 Phenolic Acid의 분석)

  • 박진우
    • YAKHAK HOEJI
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    • v.26 no.2
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    • pp.129-132
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    • 1982
  • A GC/MS method was developed to analyze phenolic acid extract from tobacco leaf. Extracted acids were converted to their methyl esters by refluxing with 3M hydrogen chloride in methanol, and the esters were reacted with his (trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide plus 10% trimethylchlorosilane to silylate the phenolic groups. Derivatives of standard salicylic, p-hydroxybenzoic, vanillic, gentisic, p-coumaric, syringic, ferulic, and sinapic acids prepared by this procedure were analyzed by GC/MS on $20m{\times}0.2mm$ column of SE-54 glass capillary. GC/MS analysis of the extract from tobacco leaf revealed the presence of salicylic, p-hydtoxybenzoic, vanillic, gentisic, protocatechuic, p-coumaric, syringic, gallic, ferulic, caffeic, sinapic, and quinic acids, respectively. The quantitative analysis of these phenolic acids were achieved by using multiple ion selection technique.

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Phenolic Acid Changes in Mycelia of Sclerotium rolfsii After Garlic and Onion Supplementation in a Broth Medium

  • Pandey, M.K.;Singh, D.P.;Singh, U.P.
    • Mycobiology
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    • v.33 no.3
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    • pp.137-141
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    • 2005
  • High performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of mycelia of Sclerotium rolfsii grown in broth medium supplemented with garlic (Allium sativum) and onion (Allium cepa) was carried out to estimate qualitative and quantitative changes in phenolic acids. Several phenolic acids, such as gallic, chlorogenic; ferulic, o-coumaric and cinnamic acids were detected in varied amounts in mycelia grown on such media as compared to control. Phenolic acids represents a wide range of secondary metabolite found in the cells of plants and microbes including fungi. The growth characters of S. rolfsii in various supplements also varied from thin and transparent to thick and opaque.

Fixed -bed Adsorption of Food-Related Phenolic Acids on Charocal in Single Solute System

  • Lee, Won-Young;Park, Yong-Hee
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.3 no.2
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    • pp.123-127
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    • 1998
  • Fixed-bed adsorption was adapted to separate phenolic acids from diluted phenolic solution. Break-through curve was obtained by nonlinear curve fitting method, and breakpoint, saturation time, and mass transfer coeffi-cient were calculated . Break point and saturation time were reached slower with $\rho$-coumaric acid than ferulic acid .The p-coumaric acid, having small molecular weight, is suposedly traveled longer pathway in characoal than ferulic acid. Fixed-bed adsorption iwht gallic acid having more hydroxyl functional group than other phenolic acids showed break point arrival and the largest saturation time. This fact means that there was bigger electrostatic affinity between gallic acid and charcoal than between other phenolic acids and charcoal.

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Phenolic Acid Composition and Antioxidative Activity of Chestnut Endoderm (밤 삽피의 페놀산 조성과 항산화 활성)

  • Kim, Young-Chan;Kim, Mi-Yeon;Chung, Shin-Kyo
    • Applied Biological Chemistry
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    • v.45 no.3
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    • pp.162-167
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    • 2002
  • Free, soluble esterified and insoluble bounded phenolic acids were separated from Eungi chestnut endoderm. The composition and contents of phenolic acid were analyzed by gas chromatography, and their antioxidant activity was examined by DPPH assay, 2-deoxyribose oxidation, and ferric thiocyanate method. Gallic, ellagic, salicylic, and gentisic acids in free phenolic acid fraction, gallic, ellagic, and protocatechuic acids in soluble esterified fraction, sianpic and gentisic acids were the major phenolic acids in insoluble bounded fraction. Marked differences were observed in the phenolic acid composition and contents among the fractions. Free phenolic acid fraction showed the strongest antioxidant activity. Results revealed chestnut endoderm could be a potential antioxidant source containing gallic and ellagic acids.

Identification of Biologically Active Substances from Medicinal Plants (약용식물(藥用植物)(음나무, 오가피)로부터 생리활성물질(生理活性物質) 검정(檢定))

  • Lee, I.J.;Kim, K.U.
    • Korean Journal of Weed Science
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    • v.7 no.3
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    • pp.289-298
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    • 1987
  • This study was conducted to investigate the presence of biologically active substances such as phenolic acids, fatty acids and organic acids in the medical plants like Kalopanax pictum and Acanthopanacis cortex. Alcohol extracts of K. pictum and A. cortex showed complete inhibition of lettuce seed germination, indicating that these plants contained the biologically active substances. Eleven phenolic acids including protocatechuic acid were identified from K. pictum and A. cortex by GLC, and the contents of total phenolic acid were 1.7917mg/g in K. pictum, and 0.9567mg/g in A. cortex. Polyphenols such as neochlorogenic acid, chi orogenic acid, scopoletin, rutin and kaempferolglycoside which were not detected by GLC were anayzed by HPLC, and among phenolic acids indentified chi orogenic acid seemed to be the major acid in both K. pictum and A. cortex presented in amount of 23.7 and 13.0ppm, respectively. K. pictum contained 5.26mg/g of fatty acids and 27.69mg/g of organic acids, and A. cortex possessed 3.22mg/g of fatty acids and 9.80mg/g of organic acids, linoleic and oxalic acid appeared to be the major fatty and organic acids, representing more than 50% of total fatty acids and 80% of total organic acids.

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