• Title, Summary, Keyword: personalized treatment

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A Review on Korean Medicine and Personalized Medicine: Syndrome-based Personalized Medicine on the Basis of Syndrome Differentiation and Treatment (한의학과 개인맞춤의학에 대한 소고; 변증논치에 근거한 '증 기반 개인맞춤의학')

  • Han, Jae Min;Yang, Woong Mo
    • The Journal of Korean Medicine
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    • v.35 no.3
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    • pp.40-48
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    • 2014
  • Objectives: This study aimed to review the characteristics of personalized medicine and Korean medicine, and the correlation between personalized medicine and Korean medicine. Methods: We investigated various studies in PubMed, Scopus and domestic Korean medicine journals. In addition, we discussed the topic based on literature. Results: Western medicine developed as evidence-based medicine. However, its limitations are being reached, so a new paradigm of medicine is needed. As a result, personalized medicine has appeared. Recently, through the development of human genomics, personalized medicine has been researched on the basis of individual genetic characteristics. Korean medicine has developed with a unique holistic approach and treats not the disease itself but the patient's body. Its characteristic is well expressed through syndrome differentiation and treatment. Syndrome differentiation represents the nature of person-centered medicine and becomes the root of personalized medicine. Conclusions: Compared with genome-based personalized medicine of Western medicine, Korean medicine could be classified as syndrome-based personalized medicine. It would be great to apply this characteristic to clinical practices.

Clinical Efficacy and Possible Applications of Genomics in Lung Cancer

  • Alharbi, Khalid Khalaf
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.5
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    • pp.1693-1698
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    • 2015
  • The heterogeneous nature of lung cancer has become increasingly apparent since introduction of molecular classification. In general, advanced lung cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. Activating alterations in several potential driver oncogenic genes have been identified, including EGFR, ROS1 and ALK and understanding of their molecular mechanisms underlying development, progression, and survival of lung cancer has led to the design of personalized treatments that have produced superior clinical outcomes in tumours harbouring these mutations. In light of the tsunami of new biomarkers and targeted agents, next generation sequencing testing strategies will be more appropriate in identifying the patients for each therapy and enabling personalized patients care. The challenge now is how best to interpret the results of these genomic tests, in the context of other clinical data, to optimize treatment choices. In genomic era of cancer treatment, the traditional one-size-fits-all paradigm is being replaced with more effective, personalized oncologic care. This review provides an overview of lung cancer genomics and personalized treatment.

Ultra-rare Disease and Genomics-Driven Precision Medicine

  • Lee, Sangmoon;Choi, Murim
    • Genomics & Informatics
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    • v.14 no.2
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    • pp.42-45
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    • 2016
  • Since next-generation sequencing (NGS) technique was adopted into clinical practices, revolutionary advances in diagnosing rare genetic diseases have been achieved through translating genomic medicine into precision or personalized management. Indeed, several successful cases of molecular diagnosis and treatment with personalized or targeted therapies of rare genetic diseases have been reported. Still, there are several obstacles to be overcome for wider application of NGS-based precision medicine, including high sequencing cost, incomplete variant sensitivity and accuracy, practical complexities, and a shortage of available treatment options.

Personalized Cancer Treatment for Ovarian Cancer

  • Chumworathayi, Bandit
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.3
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    • pp.1661-1664
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    • 2013
  • Recently there have been numerous advances in understanding the genetic basis of cancer which have resulted in more appropriate treatments. In this paper we describe the experience of the Burzynski Clinic, involved in treatment of numerous patients based on personalized approach using novel combinations for difficult-to-treat malignancies, with gynecological cancers. This retrospective study was conducted by extracting data from Burzynski Clinic's medical records and comprehensive review. Among the advanced refractory ovarian cancers cases (N=33), an objective response (OR) was found in 42.4%. We anticipate that with improved technology and novel therapeutics this rate will increase and adverse events will be reduced.

Overview of personalized medicine in the disease genomic era

  • Hong, Kyung-Won;Oh, Berm-Seok
    • BMB Reports
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    • v.43 no.10
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    • pp.643-648
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    • 2010
  • Sir William Osler (1849-1919) recognized that "variability is the law of life, and as no two faces are the same, so no two bodies are alike, and no two individuals react alike and behave alike under the abnormal conditions we know as disease". Accordingly, the traditional methods of medicine are not always best for all patients. Over the last decade, the study of genomes and their derivatives (RNA, protein and metabolite) has rapidly advanced to the point that genomic research now serves as the basis for many medical decisions and public health initiatives. Genomic tools such as sequence variation, transcription and, more recently, personal genome sequencing enable the precise prediction and treatment of disease. At present, DNA-based risk assessment for common complex diseases, application of molecular signatures for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, genome-guided therapy, and dose selection of therapeutic drugs are the important issues in personalized medicine. In order to make personalized medicine effective, these genomic techniques must be standardized and integrated into health systems and clinical workflow. In addition, full application of personalized or genomic medicine requires dramatic changes in regulatory and reimbursement policies as well as legislative protection related to privacy. This review aims to provide a general overview of these topics in the field of personalized medicine.

Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), A Key Tool to open the Personalized Medicine Era

  • Kwon, Sun-Il
    • Korean Journal of Clinical Laboratory Science
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    • v.44 no.4
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    • pp.167-177
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    • 2012
  • Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) is a term that means post-Sanger sequencing methods with high-throughput sequencing technologies. NGS parallelizes the sequencing process, producing thousands or millions of sequences at once. The latest NGS technologies use even single DNA molecule as a template and measures the DNA sequence directly via measuring electronic signals from the extension or degradation of DNA. NGS is making big impacts on biomedical research, molecular diagnosis and personalized medicine. The hospitals are rapidly adopting the use of NGS to help to patients understand treatment with sequencing data. As NGS equipments are getting smaller and affordable, many hospitals are in the process of setting up NGS platforms. In this review, the progress of NGS technology development and action mechanisms of representative NGS equipments of each generation were discussed. The key technological advances in the commercialized platforms were presented. As NGS platforms are a great concern in the healthcare area, the latest trend in the use of NGS and the prospect of NGS in the future in diagnosis and personalized medicine were also discussed.

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Nanotechnology in Cancer Therapy: Overview and Applications

  • Choi, Eun-Joo
    • Journal of Pharmaceutical Investigation
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    • v.41 no.2
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    • pp.59-65
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    • 2011
  • Nanotechnology for cancer therapy is playing a pivotal role in dramatically improving current approaches to cancer detection, diagnosis, and therapy while reducing toxic side effects associated with previous cancer therapy. A widespread understanding of these new technologies will lead to develop the more refined design of optimized nanoparticles with improved selectivity, efficacy and safety in the clinical practice of oncology. This review provides an integrated overview of applications and advances of nanotechnology in cancer therapy, based on molecular diagnostics, treatment, monitoring, target drug delivery, approved nanoparticle-based chemotherapeutic agents, and current clinical trials in the development of nanomedicine and ultimately personalized medicine.

Pros and cons of using aberrant glycosylation as companion biomarkers for therapeutics in cancer

  • Kang, Jeong-Gu;Ko, Jeong-Heon;Kim, Yong-Sam
    • BMB Reports
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    • v.44 no.12
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    • pp.765-771
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    • 2011
  • Cancer treatment has been stratified by companion biomarker tests that serve to provide information on the genetic status of cancer patients and to identify patients who can be expected to respond to a given treatment. This stratification guarantees better efficiency and safety during treatment. Cancer patients, however, marginally benefit from the current companion biomarker-aided treatment regimens, presumably because companion biomarker tests are dependent solely on the mutation status of several genes status quo. In the true sense of the term, "personalized medicine", cancer patients are deemed to be identified individually by their molecular signatures, which are not necessarily confined to genetic mutations. Glycosylation is tremendously dynamic and shows alterations in cancer. Evidence is accumulating that aberrant glycosylation contributes to the development and progression of cancer, holding the promise for use of glycosylation status as a companion biomarker in cancer treatment. There are, however, several challenges derived from the lack of a reliable detection system for aberrant glycosylation, and a limited library of aberrant glycosylation. The challenges should be addressed if glycosylation status is to be used as a companion biomarker in cancer treatment and contribute to the fulfillment of personalized medicine.

A Diet Prescription System for U-Healthcare Personalized Services (유헬스케어 개인화 서비스를 위한 식단 처방 시스템)

  • Kim, Jong-Hun;Park, Jee-Song;Jung, Eun-Young;Park, Dong-Kyun;Lee, Young-Ho
    • The Journal of the Korea Contents Association
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    • v.10 no.2
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    • pp.111-119
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    • 2010
  • U-Healthcare provides healthcare and medical services, such as prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up services whenever and wherever it is needed, and its ultimate goal is to improve quality of life. This study defines the figure of U-Healthcare personalized services for providing U-Healthcare personalized services and proposes a healthcare model. A diet prescription system for personalized services can draw customized calories and rates of nutrition factors and represent a personalized diet through analyzing the personal preference in foods. This system changes the personal preference by monitoring the diet selection behavior of users. Also, this system is designed to be interactively operated with some sensors and devices in various environments using Java-based OSGi middleware.

Molecular Diagnosis for Personalized Target Therapy in Gastric Cancer

  • Cho, Jae Yong
    • Journal of Gastric Cancer
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    • v.13 no.3
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    • pp.129-135
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    • 2013
  • Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In advanced and metastatic gastric cancer, the conventional chemotherapy with limited efficacy shows an overall survival period of about 10 months. Patient specific and effective treatments known as personalized cancer therapy is of significant importance. Advances in high-throughput technologies such as microarray and next generation sequencing for genes, protein expression profiles and oncogenic signaling pathways have reinforced the discovery of treatment targets and personalized treatments. However, there are numerous challenges from cancer target discoveries to practical clinical benefits. Although there is a flood of biomarkers and target agents, only a minority of patients are tested and treated accordingly. Numerous molecular target agents have been under investigation for gastric cancer. Currently, targets for gastric cancer include the epidermal growth factor receptor family, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor axis, and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Deeper insights of molecular characteristics for gastric cancer has enabled the molecular classification of gastric cancer, the diagnosis of gastric cancer, the prediction of prognosis, the recognition of gastric cancer driver genes, and the discovery of potential therapeutic targets. Not only have we deeper insights for the molecular diversity of gastric cancer, but we have also prospected both affirmative potentials and hurdles to molecular diagnostics. New paradigm of transdisciplinary team science, which is composed of innovative explorations and clinical investigations of oncologists, geneticists, pathologists, biologists, and bio-informaticians, is mandatory to recognize personalized target therapy.