• Title, Summary, Keyword: neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio

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Clinical Significance of Preoperative Inflammatory Parameters in Gastric Cancer Patients

  • Lee, Deuk Young;Hong, Seong Woo;Chang, Yeo Goo;Lee, Woo Yong;Lee, Byungmo
    • Journal of Gastric Cancer
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    • v.13 no.2
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    • pp.111-116
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    • 2013
  • Purpose: Chronic inflammation induces cancer and cancer induces local tissue damage with systemic inflammation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the potential relationship between the severity of inflammation and prognosis in cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This study enrolled 220 patients from January 2002 to December 2006 who underwent gastric surgery. We evaluated the relationship between preoperative inflammatory parameters (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio) and other clinicopathological factors. Survival outcomes were compared according to the extent of inflammation. Results: Significant elevation of erythrocyte sedimentation rate was related with old age, increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, decreased hemoglobin, increased carcinoembryonic antigen, increased tumor size and advanced TNM stage. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was significantly correlated with old age, increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate and advanced TNM stage. In the univariate analysis, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio had significantly poorer survival than those without elevation (all P<0.05). However, the multivariate analysis failed to prove erythrocyte sedimentation rate and neutrophil-tolymphocyte ratio as independent prognostic factors. Conclusions: The elevation of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio were correlated with poor prognosis in the univariate analysis and there was a strong correlation between inflammatory parameters (erythrocyte sedimentation rate and neutrophil- to-lymphocyte ratio) and tumor progression. Thus, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio are considered useful as follow-up factors.

Roles of White Blood Cells and Subtypes as Inflammatory Markers in Skin Cancer

  • Baykan, Halit;Cihan, Yasemin Benderli;Ozyurt, Kemal
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.6
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    • pp.2303-2306
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    • 2015
  • Objective: Skin tumors are the most commonly seen cancer type worldwide. Regarding pathogenesis, it is thought that disruption of kinetics through T lymphocyte-mediated development of chronic inflammation may be involved. The present study was intended to identify role of inflammatory cells such as neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes in the determination of risk for skin cancer. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed charts of 569 cases diagnosed as having primary skin tumors. Data regarding age, gender and histopathological subtype were recorded. Blood parameters studied on the day before surgery including WBCs, neutrophils, and lymphocyte counts, neutrophil:lymphocyte and neutrophil:monocyte ratios were also recorded. Two-hundred and two healthy individuals presented for check-up in an outpatient clinic were selected as the control group. Parameters studied in cases with skin cancer were compared to those healthy individuals. Findings: Of the cases with skin cancer, 401 were basal cell carcinoma (BCC) while 144 were squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 13 were malignant melanoma (MM). WBC, neutrophil and monocyte counts and the neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio were found to be lower in the patient group than in the healthy control group (p<0.001) while no significant difference was found in other parameters reviewed (p>0.05). No significant difference was found in WBC, neutrophil, neutrophil: monocyte ratio according to gender (p>0.05). Monocyte count was found to be $0.68{\pm}0.61$ in men and $0.55{\pm}0.25$ in women, indicating strong statistical significance (p<0.001). WBC, neutrophil and monocyte values were highest in control group while lowest in BCC. When BCC and SCC groups were compared to controls, significant differences found (p<0.001). There were no significant differences in lymphocyte counts among groups (p=0.976). Neutrophil:lymphocyte ratios were 3.24 in BCC, 3.59 in SCC, 3.44 in MM and 5.06 in control group (p<0.001). Conclusions: In our study, it was found that there were significant differences in complete blood count, neutrophil, monocyte and neutrophil:lymphocyte levels among groups. Neutrophil: lymphocyte ratio was found to be lowest in BCC among skin cancers.

Comparison of Neutrophil/Lymphocyte and Platelet/Lymphocyte Ratios for Predicting Malignant Potential of Suspicious Ovarian Masses in Gynecology Practice

  • Topcu, Hasan Onur;Guzel, Ali Irfan;Ozer, Irfan;Kokanali, Mahmut Kuntay;Gokturk, Umut;Muftuoglu, Kamil Hakan;Doganay, Melike
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.15
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    • pp.6239-6241
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    • 2014
  • Purpose: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) with the platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in predicting malignancy of pelvic masses which are pre-operatively malignant suspicious. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study we evaluated the clinical features of patients with ovarian masses which had pre-operatively been considered suspicious for malignancy. The patients whose intraoperative frozen sections were malign were classified as the study group, while those who had benign masses were the control group. Data recorded were age of the patient, diameter of the mass, pre-operative serum Ca 125 levels, platelet count, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and platelet/lymphocyte ratio. Results: There was statistically significantly difference between the groups in terms of age, diameter of the mass, serum Ca 125 levels, platelet number and platelet/lymphocyte ratio. Mean neutrophil/lymphocyte ratios showed no difference between the groups. ROC curve analysis showed that age, serum Ca 125 levels, platelet number and PLR were discriminative markers in predicting malignancy in adnexal masses. Conclusions: According to the current study, serum Ca 125 levels, pre-operative platelet number and PLR may be good prognostic factors, while NLR is an ineffective marker in predicting the malignant characteristics of a pelvic mass.

Subtypes of White Blood Cells in Patients with Prostate Cancer or Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Healthy Individuals

  • Cihan, Yasemin Benderli;Arslan, Alaettin;Ergul, Mehmet Ali
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.8
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    • pp.4779-4783
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    • 2013
  • Background: This study aimed to evaluate the baseline white blood cell (WBC), neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, basophil, eosinophil count, total prostate-specific antigen (TPSA), free PSA (FPSA) level, neutrophilto- lymphocyte and neutrophil-to-monocyte ratios among patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), as well as healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: 2005-2012 laboratory files of 160 patients with prostate cancer at Kayseri Training and Research Hospital, Oncology Outpatient Clinic, 285 patients who were pathologically diagnosed with BPH in Urology Outpatient Clinic and 200 healthy individuals who were admitted to Internal Medicine Outpatient Clinic were retrospectively analyzed. Baseline WBC, neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, basophil, eosinophil count, TPSA, FPSA level, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and neutrophil-to-monocyte ratio were recorded and compared across groups. Results: Patients with prostate cancer had a lower lymphocyte level compared to the patients with BPH and healthy controls (p<0.001). The mean monocyte count, leukocyte-to-monocyte ratio, and leukocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio were higher in patients with prostate cancer, but without significance. The mean WBC and leukocyte count were lower in patients with prostate cancer, but again without statistical significance (p=0.130). The mean TPSA and FPSA were 39.4 and 5.67, respectively in patients with prostate cancer, while they were 5.78 and 1.28 in patients with BPH. There was a significant difference in the mean TPSA and FPSA levels between the patient groups (p<0.001). Conclusions: Our study results showed that patients with prostate cancer had a lower level of lymphocytes, neutrophils and WBCs and a higher level of monocytes with a significant difference in lymphocyte count, compared to healthy controls. We suggest that lymphocyte count may be used in combination with other parameters in the diagnosis of prostate cancer, thanks to its ease of assessment.

May the Platelet to Lymphocyte Ratio be a Prognostic Factor for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer?

  • Kokcu, Arif;Kurtoglu, Emel;Celik, Handan;Tosun, Migraci;Malatyalıoglu, Erdal;Ozdemir, Ayse Zehra
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.22
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    • pp.9781-9784
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    • 2014
  • Background: The study aimed to evaluate changes in hematologic parameters, including white blood cell, platelet count, platelet indices, the platelet to lymphocyte and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratios in patients with early and advanced stages of epithelial ovarian cancers. Materials and Methods: The study included 100 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer who underwent primary staging exploratory laparotomy. Preoperative hematologic parameters, tumor histopathologic type, grade, stage and serum CA-125 levels were retrospectively analyzed. These parameters were compared between the patients with early (stage I-II) and advanced (stage III-IV) ovarian cancer. Results: White blood cell count and platelet indices, including mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet crit did not show a statistically significant difference between groups with early and advanced ovarian cancer. However, the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, platelet count, the platelet to lymphocyte ratio and CA-125 level showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups (p<0.05, p<0.01, p<0.001, p<0.01 respectively). Conclusions: It was found that the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, platelet count and the platelet to lymphocyte ratio increased with the increasing stage of ovarian cancer. Furthermore, it was seen that the platelet to lymphocyte ratio is an independent prognostic factor related to the stage of epithelial ovarian cancer.

Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio as a Prognostic Factor in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients (말기 암 환자에서 호중구-림프구 비가 예후인자로서 생존기간에 미치는 영향)

  • Cho, Wan-Je;Hwang, Hee-Jin;Lee, Yong-Jae;Son, Ga-Hyun;Oh, Seung-Min;Lee, Hye-Ree;Shim, Jae-Yong
    • The Korean Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care
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    • v.11 no.4
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    • pp.181-187
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    • 2008
  • Purpose: In order to establish efficient palliative treatment plans. It is important to estimate the survival time of a terminally ill cancer patient as accurate as possible. Proper estimation of life expectancy aids not only in improving the quality of life of the patient, it also promotes productive communication between the medical staff and the patient. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio as a predictor of survival time in terminally ill cancer patients. Methods: Between January 2004 and June 2007, 67 terminally ill cancer patients who were admitted or transferred for palliative care, were included. Patients were categorized into three groups by Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio. Demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics and blood samples were analyzed. Results: In univariate analysis, survival time of the highest Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio group (${\geq}12.5$) was significantly shorter than that of the others (hazard ratio (HR)=3.270, P=0.001). After adjustment for low performance status (ECOG score 4) and dyspnea, high Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio (${\geq}12.5$) was significantly and independently associated with short survival time (HR=2.907, P=0.007). Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio was also significantly increased before death (P=0.001). Conclusion: Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio can be useful in predicting life expectancy in terminally ill cancer patients.

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Prognostic Value of Baseline Neutrophil-Lymphocyte and Platelet-Lymphocyte Ratios in Local and Advanced Gastric Cancer Patients

  • Aldemir, Mehmet Naci;Turkeli, Mehmet;Simsek, Melih;Yildirim, Nilgun;Bilen, Yusuf;Yetimoglu, Harun;Bilici, Mehmet;Tekin, Salim Basol
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.14
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    • pp.5933-5937
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    • 2015
  • Background: We aimed to investigate the prognostic value of baseline neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet counts along with the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in local and advanced gastric cancer patients. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, a total of 103 patients with gastric cancer were included. For all, patient characteristics and overall survival (OS) times were evaluated. Data from a complete blood count test including neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, white blood cell (WBC) and platelet (Plt) count, hemoglobin level (Hb) were recorded, and the NLR and PLR were obtained for every patient prior to pathological diagnosis before any treatment was applied. Results: Of the patients, 53 had local disease, underwent surgery and were administered adjuvant chemoradiotherapy where indicated. The remaining 50 had advanced disease and only received chemotherapy. OS time was $71.6{\pm}6$ months in local gastric cancer patients group and $15{\pm}2$ months in the advanced gastric cancer group. Univariate analysis demonstrated that only high platelet count (p=0.013) was associated with better OS in the local gastric cancer patients. In contrast, both low NLR (p=0.029) and low PLR (p=0.012) were associated with better OS in advanced gastric cancer patients. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that NLR and PLR had no effect on prognosis in patients with local gastric cancer who underwent surgery and received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. In advanced gastric cancer patients, both NLR and PLR had significant effects on prognosis, so they may find application as easily measured prognostic factors for such patients.

Relationship between Colonic Polyp Type and the Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio as a Biomarker

  • Karaman, Hatice;Karaman, Ahmet;Erden, Abdulsamet;Poyrazoglu, Orhan Kursat;Karakukcu, Cigdem;Tasdemir, Arzu
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.5
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    • pp.3159-3161
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    • 2013
  • Aim: We designed this study to investigate the neutrophil lymphocyte ratio as a biomarker in distinguishing colonic polyps which are neoplastic or non-neoplastic. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty-five patients with colonic polyps were enrolled into the study. The following data were obtained from a computerized patient registry database: mean platelet volume (MPV), uric acid (UA), platelet count (PC), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR). Exclusion criteria were active infectious disease, hematological disorders, and malignancies. Colonic polyps divided into two groups as neoplastic polyps (tubular adenoma, villous adenoma, tubulovillous adenoma) and non-neoplastic polyps (hyperplastic polyps, inflammatory pseudopolyps etc). The relationship between colonic polyp type and NLR was evaluated with statistical analysis. Results: There were 67 patients (53.6%) with neoplastic and 58 (46.4%) patients with non-neoplastic polyps. Mean NLRs of neoplastic and non-neoplastic groups were respectively $3.32{\pm}2.54$ and $2.98{\pm}3.16$ (P<0.05). Conclusion: Although sensitivity and specificity are not high, NLR may be used as a biomarker of neoplastic condition of colonic polyps.

Predictive Value of the Platelet-To-Lymphocyte Ratio in Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

  • Yuksel, Ozgur Haki;Urkmez, Ahmet;Akan, Serkan;Yldirim, Caglar;Verit, Ayhan
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.15
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    • pp.6407-6412
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    • 2015
  • Purpose: To predict prostatic carcinoma using a logistic regression model on prebiopsy peripheral blood samples. Materials and Methods: Data of a total of 873 patients who consulted Urology Outpatient Clinics of Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital between February 2008 and April 2014 scheduled for prostate biopsy were screened retrospectively. PSA levels, prostate volumes, prebiopsy whole blood cell counts, neutrophil and platelet counts, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), biopsy results and Gleason scores in patients who had established diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) were evaluated. Results: This study was performed on a total of 873 cases, with an age range 48-76 years, divided into three groups as for biopsy results. with diagnoses of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) (n=304, 34.8 %), PCa (n=265, 30.4 %) and histological prostatitis (n=304; 34.8 %). Intra- and intergroup comparative evaluations were performed. White blood cell and neutrophil counts in the histological prostatitis group were significantly higher than those of the BPH and PCa groups (p=0.001; p=0.004; p<0.01). A statistically significant intergroup difference was found for PLR (p=0.041; p<0.05) but not lymphocyte count (p>0.05). According to pairwise comparisons, PLR were significantly higher in the PCa group relative to BPH group (p=0.018, p<0.05, respectively). Though not statistically significant, higher PLR in cases with PCa in comparison with the prostatitis group was remarkable (p=0.067, and p>0.05, respectively). Conclusions: Meta-analyses showed that in patients with PSA levels over 4 ng/ml, positive predictive value of PSA is only 25 percent. Therefore, novel markers which can both detect clinically significant prostate cancer, and also prevent unnecessary biopsies are needed. Relevant to this issue in addition to PSA density, velocity, and PCA3, various markers have been analyzed. In the present study, PLR were found to be the additional predictor of prostatic carcinoma.

Are Neutrophil/Lymphocyte and Platelet/Lymphocyte Ratios Associated with Endometrial Precancerous and Cancerous Lesions in Patients with Abnormal Uterine Bleeding?

  • Acmaz, Gokhan;Aksoy, Huseyin;Unal, Dilek;Ozyurt, Sezin;Cingillioglu, Basak;Aksoy, Ulku;Muderris, Ipek
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.4
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    • pp.1689-1692
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    • 2014
  • Background: An easy, reproducible and simple marker is needed to estimate phase of endometrial pathologic lesions such as hyperplasia and endometrial cancer and distinguish from pathologically normal results. We here aimed to clarify associations among neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), endometrial hyperplasia and cancer in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding. Materials and Methods: Patients (n=161) who were admitted with abnormal uterine bleeding and the presence of endometrial cells on cervical cytology or thick endometrium were investigated. The study constituted of three groups according to pathologic diagnosis. Group 1 included endometrial precancerous lesions like hyperplasia (n=63), group 2 included endometrial cancerous lesions (n=38) and group 3 was a pathologically normal group (n=60). Blood samples were obtained just before the curettage procedure and the NLR was defined as the absolute neutrophil count divided by the absolute lymphocyte count; similarly, PLR was defined as the absolute platelet count divided by the absolute lymphocyte count. Results: The white blood cell count was significantly higher in patients with cancer than in those with hyperplasia (p=0.005). The platelet count and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio were significantly higher in patients with cancer than in control patients, but there was significantly no difference between patients with hyperplasia and other groups (p=0.001 and p=0.025 respectively). PLR was significantly lower in control subjects than in other groups (p<0.001), but there was no significant difference between patients with hyperplasia and those with cancer. Conclusions: PLR was significantly lower in control subjects than in other groups. Thus both hyperplasia and cancer may be differentiated from pathologically normal patients by using PLR. White blood cell count was significantly higher in patients with cancer than in those with hyperplasia and pathologically normal patients. Therefore white blood cell count may be used for discriminate hyperplasia to cancer. By using multiple inflammation parameters, discrimination may be possible among endometrial cancer, endometrial precancerous lesions and pathologically normal patients.