• Title, Summary, Keyword: microbial fuel cell

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Improvement of Cathode Reaction of a Mediatorless Microbial Fuel Cell

  • Pham, The-Hai;Jang, Jae-Kyung;Chang, In-Seop;Kim, Byung-Hong
    • Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
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    • v.14 no.2
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    • pp.324-329
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    • 2004
  • Oxygen diffuses through the cation-specific membrane, reducing the coulomb yield of the fuel cell. In the present study, attempts were made to enhance current generation from the fuel cell by lowering the oxygen diffusion, including the uses of ferricyanide as a cathode mediator and of a platinum-coated graphite electrode. Ferricyanide did not act as a mediator as expected, but as an oxidant in the cathode compartment of the microbial fuel cell. The microbial fuel cell with platinum-coated graphite cathode generated a maximum current 3-4 times higher than the control fuel cell with graphite cathode, and the critical oxygen concentration of the former was 2.0 mg $1^{-1}$, whilst that of the latter was 6.6 mg $1^{-1}$. Based on these results, it was concluded that inexpensive electrodes are adequate for the construction of an economically feasible microbial fuel cell with better performance as a novel wastewater treatment process.

Dynamic Behaviors of Redox Mediators within the Hydrophobic Layers as an Important Factor for Effective Microbial Fuel Cell Operation

  • Choi, Young-Jin;Kim, Nam-Joon;Kim, Sung-Hyun;Jung, Seun-Ho
    • Bulletin of the Korean Chemical Society
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    • v.24 no.4
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    • pp.437-440
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    • 2003
  • In a mediator-aided microbial fuel cell, the choice of a proper mediator is one of the most important factors for the development of a better fuel cell system as it transfers electrons from bacteria to the electrode. The electrochemical behaviors within the lipid layer of two representative mediators, thionin and safranine O both of which exhibit reversible electron transfer reactions, were compared with the fuel cell efficiency. Thionin was found to be much more effective than safranine O though it has lower negative formal potential. Cyclic voltammetric and fluorescence spectroscopic analyses indicated that both mediators easily penetrated the lipid layer to pick up the electrons produced inside bacteria. While thionin could pass through the lipid layer, the gradual accumulation of safranine O was observed within the layer. This restricted dynamic behavior of safranine O led to the poor fuel cell operation despite its good negative formal potential.

Optimization of the Performance of Microbial Fuel Cells Containing Alkalophilic Bacillus sp.

  • CHOI, YOUNGJIN;JOOYOUNG SONG;SEUNHO JUNG;SUNGHYUN KIM
    • Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
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    • v.11 no.5
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    • pp.863-869
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    • 2001
  • A systematic study of microbial fuel cells comprised of alkalophilic Bacillus sp. B-31 has been carried out under various operating conditions. A significant amount of electricity was generated when redox mediators were used. Among the phenothiazine-type redox dyes tested, azure A was found to be the most effective both in maintaining a high cell voltage and for the long-term operation. The maximum efficiency was and for the long-term operation. The maximum efficiency was obtained at ca. $50^{\circ}C$ giving an open circuit voltage of 0.7V. A small change in temperature did not significantly affect the cell performance, but a rapid decrease in performance was observed below $20^{\circ}C$ and above $70^{\circ}C$. It was noticeable that fuel cell efficiency and discharge pattern depended strongly on the carbon source used in the initial culture medium. Regardless of the initial carbon sources, only glucose and trehalose were utilized as substrates. Galactose, however, was not substantially utilized except when galactose was used in the initial medium. Glucose, in particular, showed $87\%$ coulombic efficiency, which was the highest value ever reported, when Bacillus sp. was cultured in a maltose-containing medium. This study demonstrates that highly efficient microbial fuel cells can be constructed with alkalophilic microorganisms by fine-tuning the operating conditions and by carefully selecting carbon sources in the initial culture medium.

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A Microbial Fuel Cell Type Lactate Biosensor Using a Metal-Reducing Bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens

  • KIM, HYUNG JOO;MOON SIK HYUN;IN SEOP CHANG;BYUNG HONG KIM
    • Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
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    • v.9 no.3
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    • pp.365-367
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    • 1999
  • A fuel cell type biosensor for lactate was developed using a metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens IR-1. Under the operational conditions, the bacterial cell suspension generated the current without an electrochemical mediator in the presence of lactate. The current was proportional to the lactate concentration up to 30 mM.

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Electric power generation from treatment of food waste leachate using microbial fuel cell

  • Wang, Ze Jie;Lim, Bong Su
    • Environmental Engineering Research
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    • v.22 no.2
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    • pp.157-161
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    • 2017
  • Simultaneous treatment of food waste leachate and power generation was investigated in an air-cathode microbial fuel cell. A TCOD removal efficiency of $95.4{\pm}0.3%$ was achieved for an initial COD concentration of 2,860 mg/L. Maximum power density ranged was maximized at $1.86W/m^3$, when COD concentration varied between 60 mg/L and 2,860 mg/L. Meanwhile, columbic efficiency was determined between 1.76% and 11.07% for different COD concentrations. Cyclic voltammetric data revealed that the oxidation peak voltage occurred at -0.20 V, shifted to about -0.25 V. Moreover, a reduction peak voltage at -0.45 V appeared when organic matters were exhausted, indicating that reducible matters were produced during the decomposition of organic matters. The results showed that it was feasible to use food waste leachate as a fuel for power generation in a microbial fuel cell, and the treatment efficiency of the wastewater was satisfied.

Construction of Microbial Fuel Cells Using Thermophilic Microorganisms, Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus thermoglucosidasius

  • Choi, Young-Jin;Jung, Eun-Kyoung;Park, Hyun-Joo;Paik, Seung R.;Jung, Seun-Ho;Kim, Sung-Hyun
    • Bulletin of the Korean Chemical Society
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    • v.25 no.6
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    • pp.813-818
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    • 2004
  • A systematic study of microbial fuel cells comprised of thermophilic Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus thermoglucosidasius has been carried out under various operating conditions. Substantial amount of electricity was generated when a redox mediator was used. Being affected by operation temperature, the maximum efficiency was obtained at 50$^{\circ}C$ with an open circuit voltage of ca. 0.7 V. While a small change around the optimum temperature did not make much effect on the cell performance, the rapid decrease in performance was observed above 70$^{\circ}C$. It was noticeable that fuel cell efficiency and discharge pattern strongly depended on the kind of carbon sources used in the initial culture medium. In the case of B. thermoglucosidasius, glucose alone was utilized constitutively as a substrate in the microbial fuel cell irrespective of used carbons sources. When B. licheniformis was cultivated with lactose as a carbon source, best charging characteristics were recorded. Trehalose, in particular, showed 41.2% coulombic efficiency when B. thermoglucosidasius was cultured in a starch-containing medium. Relatively good repetitive operation was possible with B. thermoglucosidasius cells up to 12 cycles using glucose as a carbon source, when they were cultured with lactose as an initial carbon source. This study demonstrates that highly efficient thermophilic microbial fuel cells can be constructed by a pertinent modulation of the operating conditions and by carefully selecting carbon sources used in the initial culture medium.

The Structure Improvement of Microbial Fuel Cell to Generate Electricity from swine wastewater (가축분뇨를 이용하는 미생물연료전지 개발을 위한 구조개선)

  • Jang, Jaekyung;Sun, RyouYoung;Lee, SungHyoun;Kim, JongGoo;Kang, YounKoo;Kim, Young Hwa
    • 한국신재생에너지학회:학술대회논문집
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    • pp.252.1-252.1
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    • 2010
  • These studies convert to useful electricity from swine wastewater and to treat this wastewater. In order to operate the microbial fuel cell(MFC) for the swine wastewater, the anode volume of MFCs was scaled up with 5L in the vacant condition. Graphite felts and low-priced mesh stainless-less as electrode had mixed up and packed into the anode compartment. The meshed stainless-less electrode could also be acted the collector of electron produced by microorganisms in anode. For a cathode compartment, graphite felt loaded Pt/C catalyst was used. Graphite felt electrode embedded in the anode compartment was punched holds at regular intervals to prevent occurred the channeling phenomenon. The sources of seeding on microbial fuel cell was used a mixture of swine wastewater and anaerobic digestion sludge(1:1). It was enriched within 6 days. Swine wastewater was fed with 53.26 ml/min flow rate. The MFCs produced a current of about 17 mA stably used swine wastewater with $3,167{\pm}80mg/L$. The maximum power density and current density was 680 $mW/m^3$ and 3,770 $mA/m^3$, respectively. From these results it is showed that treatment of swine wastewater synchronizes with electricity generation using modified low priced microbial fuel cell.

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Determination of Microbial Growth by Protein Assay in an Air-Cathode Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

  • Li, Na;Kakarla, Ramesh;Moon, Jung Mi;Min, Booki
    • Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
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    • v.25 no.7
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    • pp.1114-1118
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    • 2015
  • Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gathered attention as a novel bioenergy technology to simultaneously treat wastewater with less sludge production than the conventional activated sludge system. In two different operations of the MFC and aerobic process, microbial growth was determined by the protein assay method and their biomass yields using real wastewater were compared. The biomass yield on the anode electrode of the MFC was 0.02 g-COD-cell/gCOD-substrate and the anolyte planktonic biomass was 0.14 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate. An MFC without anode electrode resulted in the biomass yield of 0.07 ± 0.03 g-COD-cell/g-CODsubstrate, suggesting that oxygen diffusion from the cathode possibly supported the microbial growth. In a comparative test, the biomass yield under aerobic environment was 0.46 ± 0.07 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate, which was about 3 times higher than the total biomass value in the MFC operation.