• Title, Summary, Keyword: laparoscopic resection

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Image-based Approach for Surgical Resection of Gastric Submucosal Tumors

  • Kim, Yoo-Min;Lim, Joon-Seok;Kim, Jie-Hyun;Hyung, Woo-Jin;Noh, Sung-Hoon
    • Journal of Gastric Cancer
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    • v.10 no.4
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    • pp.188-195
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    • 2010
  • Purpose: This study was done to evaluate the usefulness of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative laparoscopic ultrasound to facilitate treatment of gastric submucosal tumors. Materials and Methods: The feasibility of laparoscopic wedge resection as determined by CT findings of tumor size, location, and growth pattern was correlated with surgical findings in 89 consecutive operations. The role of laparoscopic ultrasound for tumor localization was analyzed. Results: Twenty-three patients were considered unsuitable for laparoscopic wedge resection because of large tumor size (N=13) or involvement of the gastroesophageal junction (N=9) or pyloric channel (N=1). Laparoscopic wedge resection was not attempted in 11 of these patients because of large tumor size. Laparoscopic wedge resection was successfully performed in 65 of 66 (98.5%) patients considered suitable for this procedure. Incorrect interpretation of preoperative CT resulted in a change of surgery type in seven patients (7.9%): incorrect CT diagnosis on gastroesophageal junction involvement (N=6) and on growth pattern (N=1). In 18 patients without an exophytic growth pattern, laparoscopic ultrasound was necessary and successfully localized all lesions. Conclusions: Preoperative CT and laparoscopic ultrasound are useful for surgical planning and tumor localization in laparoscopic wedge resection.

Laparoscopic Gastric Wedge Resection and Prophylactic Antireflux Surgery for a Submucosal Tumor of Gastroesophageal Junction

  • Lee, Jeong-Sun;Kim, Jin-Jo;Park, Seung-Man
    • Journal of Gastric Cancer
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    • v.11 no.2
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    • pp.131-134
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    • 2011
  • A laparoscopic wedge resection for a submucosal tumor, which is close to the gastroesophageal junction, is technically challenging. This can be a dilemma to both patients and surgeons when the tumor margin involves the gastroesophageal junction because a wedge resection in this situation might result in a deformity of the gastroesophageal junction or an injury to the lower esophageal sphincter, which ultimately results in lifelong gastroesophageal reflux disease. The patient was a 42 year-old male, whose preoperative endoscopic ultrasonographic finding did not rule out a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. He underwent a laparoscopic gastric wedge resection and prophylactic anterior partial fundoplication (Dor) and was discharged from hospital on the fifth postoperative day without any complications. There were no symptoms of reflux 5 months after surgery. A laparoscopic wedge resection and prophylactic anti-reflux surgery might be a good surgical option for a submucosal tumor at the gastroesophageal junction.

Single-incision laparoscopic ileostomy is a safe and feasible method of fecal diversion for anastomotic leakage following laparoscopic low anterior resection

  • Hwang, Duk Yeon;Lee, Gyeo Ra;Kim, Ji Hoon;Lee, Yoon Suk
    • Annals of Surgical Treatment and Research
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    • v.95 no.6
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    • pp.319-323
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    • 2018
  • Purpose: Currently, many operations are performed using the single-incision laparoscopic method. Although there have been recent reports on single-incision laparoscopic ileostomy, none have compared this method to conventional laparoscopic ileostomy. This study aimed to assess the safety and feasibility of single-incision laparoscopic ileostomy for anastomotic leakage following laparoscopic low anterior resections. Methods: From April 2012 to April 2017, 38 patients underwent laparoscopic ileostomy (single-incision; 19 patients referred to as group A, conventional laparoscopy; 19 patients referred to as group B) for anastomotic leakage following laparoscopic low anterior resection. We analyzed surgical and clinical outcomes between the 2 groups. Patients in whom a protective ileostomy was carried out during the initial laparoscopic low anterior resection were excluded from this study. Results: No significant differences were observed between the 2 groups in terms of patient demographics and initial operation details. Incisional surgical site infections occurred less in group A than in group B (2 of 19 vs. 9 of 19, P = 0.029). The median ileostomy operation time, amount of intraoperative bleeding, parastomal hernia ratio, hospital stay duration after ileostomy, postoperative pain score were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Single-incision laparoscopic ileostomy is safe and feasible method of fecal diversion for anastomotic leakage following laparoscopic low anterior resection.

Laparoscopic resection of retroperitoneal benign neurilemmoma

  • Ji, Jung Hwan;Park, Joon Seong;Kang, Chang Moo;Yoon, Dong Sup;Lee, Woo Jung
    • Annals of Surgical Treatment and Research
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    • v.92 no.3
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    • pp.149-155
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    • 2017
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to verify that laparoscopic resection for treating retroperitoneal benign neurilemmoma (NL) is expected to be favorable for complete resection of tumor with technical feasibility and safety. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 47 operations for retroperitoneal neurogenic tumor at Yonsei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital and Gangnam Severance Hospital between January 2005 and September 2015. After excluding 21 patients, the remaining 26 were divided into 2 groups: those who underwent open surgery (OS) and those who underwent laparoscopic surgery (LS). We compared clinicopathological features between the 2 groups. Results: There was no significant difference in operation time, estimated blood loss, transfusion, complication, recurrence, or follow-up period between 2 groups. Postoperative hospital stay was significantly shorter in the LS group versus the OS group (OS vs. LS, $7.00{\pm}3.43$ days vs. $4.50{\pm}2.16$ days; P = 0.031). Conclusion: We suggest that laparoscopic resection of retroperitoneal benign NL is feasible and safe by obtaining complete resection of the tumor. LS for treating retroperitoneal benign NL could be useful with appropriate laparoscopic technique and proper patient selection.

Transumbilical Single-Incision Laparoscopic Wedge Resection for Gastric Submucosal Tumors: Technical Challenges Encountered in Initial Experience

  • Park, Ji Yeon;Eom, Bang Wool;Yoon, Hongman;Ryu, Keun Won;Kim, Young-Woo;Lee, Jun Ho
    • Journal of Gastric Cancer
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    • v.12 no.3
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    • pp.173-178
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    • 2012
  • Purpose: To report the initial clinical experience with single-incision laparoscopic gastric wedge resection for submucosal tumors. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 10 patients who underwent single-incision laparoscopic gastric wedge resection between July 2009 and March 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. The demographic data, clinicopathologic and surgical outcomes were assessed. Results: The mean tumor size was 2.5 cm (range, 1.2~5.0 cm), and the tumors were mostly located on the anterior wall (4/10) or along the greater curvature (4/10), of the stomach. Nine of ten procedures were performed successfully, without the use of additional trocars, or conversion to laparotomy. One patient underwent conversion to multiport laparoscopic surgery, to get simultaneous cholecystectomy safely. The mean operating time was 66.5 minutes (range, 24~132 minutes), and the mean postoperative hospital stay was 5 days (range, 4~7 days). No serious perioperative complications were observed. Of the 10 submucosal tumors, the final pathologic report revealed 5 gastrointestinal stromal tumors, 4 schwannomas, and 1 heterotopic pancreas. Conclusions: Single-incision laparoscopic gastric wedge resection for gastric submucosal tumors is feasible and safe, when performed by experienced laparoscopic surgeons. This technique provides favorable cosmetic results, and also short hospital stay and low morbidity, in carefully selected candidates.

Endoscopic and Laparoscopic Full-Thickness Resection of Endophytic Gastric Submucosal Tumors Very Close to the Esophagogastric Junction

  • Kwon, Oh Kyoung;Yu, Wansik
    • Journal of Gastric Cancer
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    • v.15 no.4
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    • pp.278-285
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    • 2015
  • Purpose: Gastric submucosal tumors (SMTs) located very close to the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) are a challenge for gastric surgeons. Therefore, this study reports on the experience of using endoscopic and laparoscopic full-thickness resection (ELFR) with laparoscopic two-layer suturing in such tumors. Materials and Methods: Six patients with gastric SMTs very close to the EGJ underwent ELFR with laparoscopic two-layer suturing at Kyungpook National University Medical Center. With the patient under general anesthesia, the lesser curvature and posterior aspect adjacent to the EGJ were meticulously dissected and visualized using a laparoscopic approach. A partially circumferential full-thickness incision at the distal margin of the tumor was then made using an endoscopic approach under laparoscopic guidance. The SMT was resected using laparoscopic ultrasonic shears, and the gastric wall was closed using two-layer suturing. Thereafter, the patency and any leakage were checked through endoscopy. Results: All the ELFR procedures with laparoscopic two-layer suturing were performed successfully without an open conversion. The mean operation time was $139.2{\pm}30.9$ minutes and the blood loss was too minimal to be measured. The tumors from four patients were leiomyomas, while the tumors from the other two patients were gastrointestinal stromal tumors with clear resection margins. All the patients started oral intake on the third postoperative day. There was no morbidity or mortality. The mean hospital stay was $7.7{\pm}0.8$ days. Conclusions: ELFR with laparoscopic two-layer suturing is a safe treatment option for patients with an SMT close to the EGJ, as major resection of the stomach is avoided.

Seniors Have a Better Learning Curve for Laparoscopic Colorectal Cancer Resection

  • Zhang, Xing-Mao;Wang, Zheng;Liang, Jian-Wei;Zhou, Zhi-Xiang
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.13
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    • pp.5395-5399
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    • 2014
  • Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the outcomes of laparoscopic colorectal resection in a period of learning curve completed by surgeons with different experience and aptitudes with a view to making clear whether seniors had a better learning curve compared with juniors. Methods: From May 2010 to August 2012, the first twenty patients underwent laparoscopic colorectal resection completed by each surgeon were selected for analysis retrospectively. A total of 240 patients treated by 5 seniors and 7 juniors were divided into the senior group (n=100) and the junior group (n=140). The short-term outcomes of laparoscopic surgery of the two groups were compared. Results: The mean numbers of lymph nodes harvested were $21.2{\pm}11.0$ in the senior group and $17.3{\pm}11.5$ in the junior group (p=0.010); The mean operative times were $187.9{\pm}60.0min$ as compared to $231.3{\pm}55.7min$ (p=0.006), and blood loss values were $177.0{\pm}100.7ml$ and $234.0{\pm}185ml$, respectively (p=0.001); Conversion rate in the senior group was obviously lower than in the junior group (10.0% vs 20.7%, p=0.027) and the mean time to passing of first flatus were $3.3{\pm}0.9$ and $3.8{\pm}0.9$ days (p=0.001). For low rectal cancer, the sphincter preserving rates were 68.7% and 35.3% (p=0.027). Conclusions: Seniors could perform laparoscopic colorectal resection with relatively better oncological outcomes and quicker recovery, and seniors could master the laparoscopic skill more easily and quickly. Seniors had a better learning curve for laparoscopic colorectal cancer resection compared to juniors.

Outcomes of Laparoscopic Gastrectomy after Endoscopic Treatment for Gastric Cancer: A Comparison with Open Gastrectomy

  • Kwon, Hye Youn;Hyung, Woo Jin;Lee, Joong Ho;Lee, Sang Kil;Noh, Sung Hoon
    • Journal of Gastric Cancer
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    • v.13 no.1
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    • pp.51-57
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    • 2013
  • Purpose: Additional gastrectomy is needed after endoscopic resection for early gastric cancer when pathology confirms any possibility of lymph node metastasis or margin involvement. No studies depicted the optimal type of surgery to apply in these patients. We compared the short-term and long-term outcomes of laparoscopic gastrectomy with those of open gastrectomy after endoscopic resection to identify the optimal type of surgery. Materials and Methods: From 2003 to 2010, 110 consecutive patients who underwent gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy either by laparoscopic (n=74) or by open (n=36) for gastric cancer after endoscopic resection were retrospectively analyzed. Postoperative and oncological outcomes were compared according to types of surgical approach. Results: Clinicopathological characteristics were comparable between the two groups. Laparoscopic group showed significantly shorter time to gas passing and soft diet and hospital day than open group while operation time and rate of postoperative complications were comparable between the two groups. All specimens had negative margins regardless of types of approach. Mean number of retrieved lymph nodes did not differ significantly between the two groups. During the median follow-up of 47 months, there were no statistical differences in recurrence rate (1.4% for laparoscopic and 5.6% for open, P=0.25) and in overall (P=0.22) and disease-free survival (P=0.19) between the two groups. Type of approach was not an independent risk factor for recurrence and survival. Conclusions: Laparoscopic gastrectomy after endoscopic resection showed comparable oncologic outcomes to open approach while maintaining benefits of minimally invasive surgery. Thus, laparoscopic gastrectomy can be a treatment of choice for patients previously treated by endoscopic resection.

Feasibility of Laparoscopic Surgery for Intussusception in Pediatric Patients and Risk of Bowel Resection

  • Song, Eun Ju;Nam, So Hyun
    • Journal of Minimally Invasive Surgery
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    • v.21 no.4
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    • pp.154-159
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    • 2018
  • Purpose: Intussusception is a common cause of intestinal obstruction in children. While most patients can be treated by enema reduction, about 20% require surgery. We investigated the usefulness and feasibility of laparoscopic surgery and the intraoperative risk of bowel resection. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed pediatric patients who underwent surgery for intussusception from 2010 to 2017. We collected data for age, gender, body weight, associated symptoms, duration of symptoms, white blood cell count, operating time, and postoperative complications. Results: Of 155 patients, 37 (23.8%) underwent surgery due to enema reduction failure in 29 (78.3%), recurrence in 6 (16.3%), a suspicious lead point in 1, and suspicious ischemic change observed on ultrasonography in 1. The mean age was $26.8{\pm}18.9$ months (range, 3.5~76.7 months), and the mean body weight was $12.9{\pm}3.9kg$ (range, 5.4~22.2 kg). Laparoscopic surgery was successful in 29 patients (78.4%), and 7 (18.9%) needed bowel resection and anastomosis. The mean operating time was $56.7{\pm}32.8min$. A lead point was found in 3 patients in the bowel resection group (p=0.005); in addition, the operating time and hospital stay were longer in this group. There were no intra- or postoperative complications. Conclusion: Laparoscopic surgery was successful in 78.4% of the patients with a short hospital stay and early oral intake. The only predictive factor for bowel resection was the presence of a lead point. Laparoscopic surgery may be an optimal treatment intervention for children with intussusception, except for those who show initial peritonitis.

Analysis of Laparoscopy-assisted Gastric Cancer Operations Performed by Inexperienced Junior Surgeons

  • Zhang, Xing-Mao;Wang, Zheng;Liang, Jian-Wei;Zhou, Zhi-Xiang
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.12
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    • pp.5077-5081
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    • 2014
  • To clarify whether gastric cancer patients can benefit from laparoscopy-assisted surgery completed by junior surgeons under supervision of expert surgeons, data of 232 patients with gastric cancer underwent operation performed by inexperienced junior surgeons were reviewed. Of the 232 patients, 137 underwent laparoscopy-assisted resection and in 118 cases this approach was successful. All of these 118 patients were assigned to laparoscopic group in this study, 19 patients who were switched to open resection were excluded. All laparoscopic operations were performed under the supervision of expert laparoscopic surgeons. Some 95 patients receiving open resection were assigned to the open group. All open operations were completed independently by the same surgeons. Short-term outcomes including oncologic outcomes, operative time intra-operative blood loss, time to first flatus, time to first defecation, postoperative hospital stay and perioperative complication were compared between the two groups. The numbers of lymph nodes harvested in the laparoscopic and open groups were $21.1{\pm}9.6$ and $18.2{\pm}9.7$ (p=0.029). There was no significant difference in the length of margins. The mean operative time was $215.9{\pm}32.2$ min in laparoscopic group and $220.1{\pm}34.6min$ in the open group (p=0.866), and the mean blood loss in laparoscopic group was obviously less than that in open group ($200.9{\pm}197.0ml$ vs $291.1{\pm}191.4ml$; p=0.001). Time to first flatus in laparoscopic and open groups was $4.0{\pm}1.0$ days and $4.3{\pm}1.2$ days respectively and the difference was not significant (p=0.135). Similarly no statically significant difference was noted for time to first defecation ($4.7{\pm}1.6$ vs $4.8{\pm}1.6$, p=0.586). Eleven patients in the laparoscopic group and 19 in the open group suffered from peri-operative complications and the difference between the two groups was significant (9.3% vs 20.0%, p=0.026). The conversion rate for laparoscopic surgery was 13.9%. Patients with gastric cancer can benefit from laparoscopy-assisted operations completed by inexperienced junior surgeons under supervision of expert laparoscopic surgeons.