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Temperament of Ethnic Korean Children : A Cross-cultural Analysis (한국 아동의 기질 : 비교문화적 분석)

  • ParkChoi, Hye-Won
    • Korean Journal of Child Studies
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    • v.30 no.6
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    • pp.583-590
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    • 2009
  • This study analyzed temperament of ethnic Korean children residing in Korea comparing them with Korean children and American children residing in the USA. Parents of 169 Korean, Korean-American and American 4-7-year-old children rated them on the Very Short Form of Children's Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ; Rothbart et al., 2001). On most subscales, Korean children were reported higher than ethnic Korean children in the US while Korean-American children were rated lower than others. Attention focusing was influenced by macro systems; shifting and impulsivity were more sensitive to biological or micro systems. The bilingual setting of Korean-American children may explain the difference in control of this group from others. This study clearly showed that ecological settings play important roles in temperament.

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A Study on Children's Stress, Coping, and Motivation - Compare with Korean and American children - (아동의 스트레스, 대처행동과 성취동기에 관한 연구 - 한국과 미국 아동을 대상으로 -)

  • 박성옥
    • Journal of the Korean Home Economics Association
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    • v.39 no.9
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    • pp.63-78
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    • 2001
  • The purpose of this study is to compare how different the belief, social support, stress, coping and motivation between the Korean and American children. The data was collected from 157 Korean and 114 American students (5·8th grade). The resets were as follows: 1. Korean children's other dependency and pessimism level was significantly higher than those of American children. Also Korean children perceived higher than American children in the control-pressure stress and elf-respect stress. 2. Pessimism was observed the highest effect factor on Korean children's stress. 3. Korean students tried various coping under the relationship stress. 4. Problem oriented coping was found as an effective coping in Korean children. But the pursuit of support was found as an effective coping in American children.

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A Comparative Study of Daily Hassels Between Korean and American Children (한국과 미국 아동의 일상적 스트레스 비교 연구)

  • 지금주
    • Journal of the Korean Home Economics Association
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    • v.35 no.6
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    • pp.261-273
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    • 1997
  • In this study, we compared the perceived level of daily hassels between korean and American children. The subjects of this study were 157 Korean and 121 American children in elementary school (5th grade), 156 Korean and 90 American in middle school(7the grade). Daily hassels scale by authors consisted of the school situation, family situation, self, personal relationship and extra situation stress. The main results were as follows; 1. Korean children experienced more stress than America children in school situation, self, persona relationship and extra situation stress. 2. The perceived level of daily hassels scores among Korean and american children are not significantly different by gender. 3. Middle school students experienced more stress than elementary school students in school situation. Especially for the Korean middle school students, school situation was the most stressful factor. 4. For the stress from personal relationship, korean children experienced more stress than American children in every items except problems with by friends and girlfriends. 5. For the stress from extra situation stress, Korean children experienced more stress than American children in every items. From the result, we suggest that educational programs to improve interpersonal relationship skills, self-concept and stress coping skills should be provided for Korean children. And more environmental and educational care should be provided for Korean children, too.

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A Comparison of Obesity Prevalence between Korean-American Children and Korean Children

  • Sim Young-Ja;Kim Eun-Kyung;Park Kye-Wol;Kim Hee-Sun
    • Journal of Community Nutrition
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    • v.8 no.1
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    • pp.31-37
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    • 2006
  • This study is to compare the prevalence of obesity between Korean-American children and Korean children, and to investigate the role of environmental factors in obesity development. Prevalence of child obesity is compared by their residence, parents' anthropometric data, education and occupation, and the length of immigration, and birth place of the children. A total of 593 children between the ages of 9 and 12 were examined. 262 Korean-American children (KcUS group) from New Jersey, USA and 331 Korean children (KcK group) from Seoul, Korea were compared. KcUS group showed a higher obesity rate (male: 12.6% and female: 8.2%), compared to KcK group (male: 8.0% and female: 5.1 %). KcK male children showed lower weight and prevalence of obesity than Korean-American male children who lived in the United States for more than three years. Korean-American female children had higher weight and obesity rate than Korean female children. Waist circumference and hip circumference were also higher in obese children in both KcK and KcUS groups. The children who live in America had an odds ratio of 1.69 to be obese compared to KcK, while those born in America and those who have lived in America for more than 3 years had odds ratios of 1.53 and 1.25 to be obese, respectively. This study found that environmental factors, immigration to America for instance, could playa bigger role in child obese development than the genetic factor.

Helping our Children with Homework: Homework as an Activity of Anxiety for First Generation Bilingual Korean American Mothers

  • Park, Hye-Yoon;Jegatheesan, Brinda
    • Child Studies in Asia-Pacific Contexts
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    • v.2 no.2
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    • pp.91-107
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    • 2012
  • This study aimed to understand communicative and socialization practices of immigrant bilingual families in everyday learning situations by examining interactions between parents and children in the United States. Drawn on language socialization theory and socio-cultural factors influencing immigrants, this study explored how three Korean American mothers struggled as they helped their children with homework by interviewing the mothers and observing mother-child interaction during homework time. The study paid attention to the emotional values of immigrant parents that they tried to teach their children who are members in two distinctive communities, such as Korean American and mainstream American. The findings showed that parental socialization practices had effects on children's emotional and social competence and at the same time the socialization process was bidirectional. Mothers started with Korean values, but they faced challenges with the English language, different demands for American homework, and children's rejection of their attempts. Mothers needed to change their strategy and borrow American ways of keeping emotional distance from their children by acknowledging their independence. Their struggles are discussed with attention to their language choice and culture.

A Study on Children's Self-Perception and Daily Hassels : Compare with American and Korean Children (아동의 자기-지각과 일상적 스트레스에 관한 연구 : 한국아동과 미국아동을 대상으로)

  • 이영환
    • Journal of the Korean Home Economics Association
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    • v.36 no.12
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    • pp.73-86
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    • 1998
  • In this study, we compared how different the self-perception and the daily hassels between the Korean and American children. The subjects were 706 fifth and seventh grade students. Data were obtained by administrating a questionnaire. The instruments used for this study were self-perception profile for children scale(SPPC) and stress scale. 1. All the SPPC factors for Korean children was significantly lower than those for American children. The SPPC fators for American children didn't show any significant differences by grades. But for Korean children seventh graders showed significantly lower SPPC than fifth graders. 2. The most significant factor to predict the golbal self-worth was physical appearance for boys and girls. Self perception for physical appearance is more influential factor than scholastic competence to form the positive self-perception for both boys and girls. 3. The daily hassels for Korean children were significantly higher than those for American childredn. Also daily hassels for seventh graders were significantly higher than those for fifth graders. 4. Daily hassels global self worth correlated negatively. When the level of stress was increased, the global self-worth was decreased.

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Topic Performance: A Cross-Cultural Study of Korean and American 3-Year-Old Children (한국과 미국 유아의 의사소통에서 주제 수행에 대한 비교문화 연구)

  • Yi, Soon Hyung;Mullen, Mary K.;Sung, Mi Young
    • Korean Journal of Child Studies
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    • v.18 no.2
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    • pp.121-130
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    • 1997
  • This study investigated differences in the topic performance of 3-year-old Korean and American children. Sixteen mother and child dyads (8 Americans and 8 Koreans) were tape-recorded during naturally occurring conversations. The cape-recorded data were transcribed on the observational chechlist by Kertoy Vetter(1995). Korean children engaged in topic performance nearly twice as often as American children. Korean children engaged in topic termination/initiation and continuation more often than American children. Also, Korean children engaged in topic collaboration and incorporation more often than American children, but there was no difference in off-topic.

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The Foundational Study to Compare the Visual Perceptual Skill by MVPT-R in Korean and American Preschooler (MVPT-R을 이용한 한국과 미국 전학령기 아동의 시지각 능력 비교를 위한 기초 연구)

  • Park, Sung-Hyun;Park, So-Jung;Park, Soo-Hee;Jung, Hye-Rim;Chang, Moon-Young
    • The Journal of Korean Academy of Sensory Integration
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    • v.3 no.1
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    • pp.49-56
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    • 2005
  • Objective : The purpose of this study was to indicate the foundational data to standardize MVPT-R for Koreans. Method : This study was conducted on 221 children ranging in all preschool age from 4 to 6 years residing in Busan and Kyungsangnam-do. It was performed from January 12, 2004 to April 30, 2004. Result : First, similar to American children, as Korean children grow older, the mean raw score of MVPT-R increased. Second, Korean children's mean raw score was higher than that of American children; 3.51 in 4 age, 1.52 in 4.6 age, 2.93 in 5 age, 1.72 in 5.6 age, 1.84 in 6 age and 0.48 in 6.6 age. Third, the mean of PQ(106.57) in Korean children was higher than that of PQ in American children. Fourth, The raw score in Korean children was higher than the raw score in American children in most of the subjects(excluding visual closure subjects). Conclusion : The visual perception skill of Korean children is higher than that of American children. If we apply MVPT-R developed in U.S to Korean children, it will be difficult for Korean children to achieve the adequate results. Therefore, we must use the standardized MVPT-R for Korean that can minimize the differences between American and Korean children's visual perception skills.

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A Comparison of Food Frequency, Food Attitude, and Eating Habits between Korean -American and Korean Children

  • Kim, Eun-Kyung;Sim, Young-Ja;Park, Kye-Wol;Kim, Hee-Sun
    • Journal of Community Nutrition
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    • v.8 no.4
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    • pp.177-184
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    • 2006
  • Food frequency, food attitude, eating habits and physical activities of Korean-American children and Korean children were compared. Two hundred and sixty two Korean-American children living in New Jersey and New York in the United States of America(KcUS group) and three hundred and thirty one Korean children living in Seoul, Korea (KcK group) between the ages of 9 and 12 were included. There were significant differences in food frequency between these groups. The KcUS group ate more western food, more food at meal time and more snack than the KcK group. In addition, KcUS group slept longer hours and exercised less than KcK group. In this study, we learned that higher rate of obesity in Korean-American children could be partially explained by the difference in food intake, food attitude, eating habit, and physical activities between the two groups. It is suggested that a different approach will be useful in developing nutrition education programs against childhood obesity for the Korean-American children and Korean children.

A Comparative study on Caregiving and Inheritance patterns; Korea vs. U.S.A (비교문화적 관점에서 본 노부모부양과 재산상속의식: 한국과 미국의 비교)

  • 조병은
    • Journal of Korean Home Management Association
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    • v.15 no.4
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    • pp.125-136
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    • 1997
  • The present study compares motives for caregiving, actual caregiving provision, care expectation from children in old age, and the connections between caregiving and inheritance distribution patterns as perceived by caregiving daughters/daughters-in-law and their care-receiving mothers/mothers-in-law between Korea and the United States. The results indicated that there was no difference in caregiving motives between Korean and American children while American mothers/mothers-in-law perceived significantly lower obligatory caregiving motives than their Korean counterparts. Also, both Korean children and their mothers/mothers-in-law reported higher level of care provision than their counterparts. The level of caregiving expectation from their children in old age among Korean elders was significantly different from those of American elders while no differences were found between Korean and American children. Finally, both Korean children and their mothers/mothers-in-law were more likely to endorse distributing larger shares of inheritance to the child who cared for his/her mothers/mothers-in-law than American counterparts. On the other hand, American subjects were more likely to accept the notion of equal distribution of inheritance. Overall, this cross-cultural study showed the cultural differences in caregiving and inheritance patterns between Korean and American subjects exhibiting salient difference among the older generation.

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