• Title, Summary, Keyword: incidence data

Search Result 1,870, Processing Time 0.049 seconds

Study on the prevalence and incidence of urolithiasis in Korea over the last 10 years: An analysis of National Health Insurance Data

  • Jung, Joon Se;Han, Chang Hee;Bae, Sangrak
    • Investigative and Clinical Urology
    • /
    • v.59 no.6
    • /
    • pp.383-391
    • /
    • 2018
  • Purpose: We aimed to analyze the incidence and prevalence of urolithiasis in Korea over the last decade using the National Health Insurance (NHI) sample cohort data. Materials and Methods: From January 2002 to December 2013, we enrolled sample cohort data from the NHI. Patients diagnosed with international classification of diseases code N20 or N13.2 were included. The incidence and prevalence rate was counted from the same period and patients previously diagnosed with urolithiasis were excluded. We compared the incidence and prevalence of urolithiasis by region, age, and sex, and identified the changes. Results: Total 1,111,828 subjects were included. Of these subjects, 36,857 had urolithiasis. The male-to-female ratio was 1.57:1, and total incidence rate was 3.27 per 1,000 person-years (1,000p-yrs). The annual incidence was lowest in 2013 (3,138 patients) and highest in 2005 (3,751 patients). Incidence rate by diagnostic code was highest in ureter stone only (2.49 per 1,000p-yrs) and was lowest in kidney and ureter stone both (0.17 per 1,000p-yrs). Prevalence gradually increased from 3,172 in 2002 and 5,758 in 2013. Jeollanam-do had the highest incidence rate of 3.70 persons per 1,000p-yrs, and Jeju had the lowest rate of 2.84 persons per 1,000p-yrs. In gender analysis, Daegu had the highest incidence (4.56) in males, Jeollanam-do had the highest incidence (3.20) in females. Conclusions: Annual incidence remained stable, whereas prevalence gradually increased. The incidence in male was 1.57 times higher than female, and the peak incidence age was 45-49 years, with the highest incidence occurring in Jeollanam-do and the lowest in Jeju.

A Comparison of the Cancer Incidence Rates between the National Cancer Registry and Insurance Claims Data in Korea

  • Seo, Hee Jung;Oh, In-Hwan;Yoon, Seok-Jun
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.13 no.12
    • /
    • pp.6163-6168
    • /
    • 2012
  • Although much health services research has been conducted using national health insurance claims data in Korea, the validity of this method has not been ascertained. The objective of this study was to validate the use of claims data for health services research by comparing incidence rate of cancers found using insurance claims data against rates of the national cancer registry of Korea. An algorithm to estimate incidence rates using claims data was developed and applied. The claims data from 2005-2008 were acquired and the patients admitted to hospitals due to cancer in 2008 without admission to hospital from 2005-2007 by the same diagnosis code were regarded as incident cases. The acquired results were compared with the values from the National Cancer Registry of Korea. The incidence rate of all cancers found using claims data was 363.1 per 100,000 people, which is very similar to the 361.9 per 100,000 rate of the national cancer registry. Also the age-, gender- and disease-specific rates between the two data sources were similar. Therefore, national health insurance claims data may be a worthwhile resource for health services research if appropriate algorithms are applied, especially considering the cost effectiveness of this method.

Regression analysis of interval censored competing risk data using a pseudo-value approach

  • Kim, Sooyeon;Kim, Yang-Jin
    • Communications for Statistical Applications and Methods
    • /
    • v.23 no.6
    • /
    • pp.555-562
    • /
    • 2016
  • Interval censored data often occur in an observational study where the subject is followed periodically. Instead of observing an exact failure time, two inspection times that include it are available. There are several methods to analyze interval censored failure time data (Sun, 2006). However, in the presence of competing risks, few methods have been suggested to estimate covariate effect on interval censored competing risk data. A sub-distribution hazard model is a commonly used regression model because it has one-to-one correspondence with a cumulative incidence function. Alternatively, Klein and Andersen (2005) proposed a pseudo-value approach that directly uses the cumulative incidence function. In this paper, we consider an extension of the pseudo-value approach into the interval censored data to estimate regression coefficients. The pseudo-values generated from the estimated cumulative incidence function then become response variables in a generalized estimating equation. Simulation studies show that the suggested method performs well in several situations and an HIV-AIDS cohort study is analyzed as a real data example.

Influence of Mammographic Screening on Breast Cancer Incidence Trends in South Australia

  • Beckmann, Kerri Rose;Roder, David Murray;Hiller, Janet Esther;Farshid, Gelareh;Lynch, John William
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.15 no.7
    • /
    • pp.3105-3112
    • /
    • 2014
  • Purpose: To examine breast cancer (BC) incidence trends in relation to mammographic screening and risk factor prevalence in South Australia (SA). Materials and Methods: Trends in annual BC incidence rates were calculated using direct standardisation and compared with projected incidence derived from Poisson regression analysis of pre-screening rates. Annual percentage change and change time points were estimated using Joinpoint software. Biennial mammography screening participation rates were calculated using data from BreastScreen SA. Trends in overweight/obesity, alcohol use and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use were examined using 1991-2009 Health Omnibus Survey data. Trends in total fertility were examined using data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Results: BC incidence increased around the time BreastScreen commenced and then stabilised in the mid-1990s. However rates have remained higher than projected, even though the proportion and age distribution of first time screening attendees stabilised around 1998. A decrease in BC incidence was observed among women aged 50-59yrs from the late-1990's but not among older women. Obesity and alcohol use have increased steadily in all age groups, while HRT use declined sharply from the late-1990s. Conclusions: BC incidence has remained higher than projected since mammography screening began. The sustained elevation is likely to be due to lead time effects, though over-diagnosis cannot be excluded. Declining HRT use has also impacted incidence trends. Implications: Studies using individual level data, which can account for changes in risk factor prevalence and lead time effects, are required to evaluate 'over-diagnosis' due to screening.

Incidence and Mortality of Bladder Cancer and their Relationship with Development in Asia

  • Pakzad, Reza;Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah;Mohammadian, Mahdi;Pakzad, Iraj;Safiri, Saeid;Khazaei, Salman;Salehiniya, Hamid
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.16 no.16
    • /
    • pp.7365-7374
    • /
    • 2015
  • Background: Over the past decade, bladder cancer was associated with a significant increase. Given the importance of the impact of socioeconomic status on the distribution of cancer incidence and mortality, and the need to information on these parameters for prevention planning, the aim of this study was to evaluate data for bladder cancer and their relationship with human development index (HDI) and its components in Asia in 2012. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted based on data from the world data of cancer and the World Bank (including the HDI and its components). The incidence and mortality rates were drawn for Asian countries. To analyze data, correlation tests between incidence and death rates, and HDI and its components were employed with a significance level of 0.05 using SPSS software. Results: A total incidence of 696,231 cases (68.7% in males and 31.3% in females, sex ratio of 2.19:1) and 524,465 deaths (67.0% in men and 32.9% in women, sex ratio was 2.03:1) were recorded in Asian countries in 2012. Correlation between HDI and standardized incidence rate was 0.241 overall (p=0.106), 0.236 in men (p=0.114) and -0.250 in women (p=0.094). Also between HDI and standardized mortality rate 0.025 (p=0.871) in men 0.118 (p=0.903) and in women 0.014 (p=0.927). Conclusions: Bladder cancer incidence is higher in developed countries, but the rate is declining, and in less developed and developing countries it is growing. There was no statistically significant correlation between the standardized incidence rate of bladder cancer and the HDI and its dimensions in Asia, except for the level of education.

Incidence Rate of Noise Induced Hearing Loss in Korean Youths Using National Health Insurance Data (건강보험 자료에 의한 우리나라 청소년의 소음성 난청 환자 발생 양상)

  • Jeon, Man-Joong;Choi, Eun-Ju;Sakong, Joon
    • The Journal of Korean Society for School & Community Health Education
    • /
    • v.14 no.2
    • /
    • pp.93-112
    • /
    • 2013
  • Objectives: This study was conducted to investigate the incidence rate of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in Korean youths using the National Health Insurance Data Methods: We obtained the case of NIHL with the National Health Insurance Data and calculated the incidence rate of NIHL after classifying them by year (from 2005 through 2008), age, gender, birth cohort. Results: The age-adjusted incidence rate by year of NIHL per 100,000 population increased by 40.6% from 13.8 persons in 2005 to 19.4 persons in 2008, which showed a increasing trend every year. In particular, the incidence rate per 100,000 population among the adolescents (15-19 years of age) shot up by 78.2% from 8.7 persons in 2005 to 15.5 persons in 2008. According to the incidence rate by birth cohort of NIHL, the birth cohorts showed the gradually increase in incidence rate as time passed by. Adolescents in early 20s (20-24 years of age) had a higher incidence rate than teenage and men had a higher incidence rate than women. Conclusions: The results suggest that incidence rate of NIHL in Korean youths has rapidly increased among adolescents. Therefore, it is required to educate adolescents about the risk of hearing loss due to noise, establish program to prevent NIHL among adolescents and provide them with health education on hearing loss prevention.

  • PDF

Prediction of Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Korea, 2017

  • Jung, Kyu-Won;Won, Young-Joo;Oh, Chang-Mo;Kong, Hyun-Joo;Lee, Duk Hyoung;Lee, Kang Hyun
    • Cancer Research and Treatment
    • /
    • v.49 no.2
    • /
    • pp.306-312
    • /
    • 2017
  • Purpose This study aimed to report on cancer incidence and mortality for the year 2017 in Korea in order to estimate the nation's current cancer burden. Materials and Methods Cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2014 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and cancer mortality data from 1993 to 2015 were acquired from Statistics Korea. Cancer incidence and mortality were projected by fitting a linear regression model to observe age-specific cancer rates against observed years, and then multiplying the projected age-specific rates by the age-specific population. The Joinpoint regression model was used to determine at which year the linear trend changed significantly; we only used data of the latest trend. Results A total of 221,143 new cancer cases and 80,268 cancer deaths are expected to occur in Korea in 2017. The most common cancer sites are the colorectum, stomach, lung, thyroid, and breast. These five cancers represent half of the overall burden of cancer in Korea. For mortality, the most common sites are the lung, liver, colorectal, stomach, and pancreas. Conclusion The incidence rate of all cancers in Korea appears to have decreased mainly because of a decrease in thyroid cancer. These up-to-date estimates of the cancer burden in Korea could be an important resource for planning and evaluation of cancer-control programs.

Breast Cancer Clustering in Kanagawa, Japan: A Geographic Analysis

  • Katayama, Kayoko;Yokoyama, Kazuhito;Yako-Suketomo, Hiroko;Okamoto, Naoyuki;Tango, Toshiro;Inaba, Yutaka
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.15 no.1
    • /
    • pp.455-460
    • /
    • 2014
  • Background: The purpose of the present study was to determine geographic clustering of breast cancer incidence in Kanagawa Prefecture, using cancer registry data. The study also aimed at examining the association between socio-economic factors and any identified cluster. Materials and Methods: Incidence data were collected for women who were first diagnosed with breast cancer during the period from January to December 2006 in Kanagawa. The data consisted of 2,326 incidence cases extracted from the total of 34,323 Kanagawa Cancer Registration data issued in 2011. To adjust for differences in age distribution, the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of breast cancer were calculated for each of 56 municipalities (e.g., city, special ward, town, and village) in Kanagawa by an indirect method using Kanagawa female population data. Spatial scan statistics were used to detect any area of elevated risk as a cluster for breast cancer deaths and/or incidences. The Student t-test was performed to examine differences in socio-economic variables, viz, persons per household, total fertility rate, age at first marriage for women, and marriage rate, between cluster and other regions. Results: There was a statistically significant cluster of breast cancer incidence (p=0.001) composed of 11 municipalities in southeastern area of Kanagawa Prefecture, whose SIR was 35 percent higher than that of the remainder of Kanagawa Prefecture. In this cluster, average value of age at first-marriage for women was significantly higher than in the rest of Kanagawa (p=0.017). No statistically significant clusters of breast cancer deaths were detected (p=0.53). Conclusions: There was a statistically significant cluster of high breast cancer incidence in southeastern area of Kanagawa Prefecture. It was suggested that the cluster region was related to the tendency to marry later. This study methodology will be helpful in the analysis of geographical disparities in cancer deaths and incidence.

Spatial and Temporal Epidemiological Assessment of Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Kazakhstan, 1999-2013

  • Beysebayev, Eldar;Bilyalova, Zarina;Kozhakeeva, Lyazzat;Baissalbayeva, Ainur;Abiltayeva, Aizhan
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.16 no.15
    • /
    • pp.6795-6798
    • /
    • 2015
  • Breast cancer incidence and mortality in Kazakhstan are considered to be increasing but exact statistics have hitherto been lacking. The present study was therefore undertaken to retrospectively assess data for the whole country, accessed from the central registration office, for the period 1999-2013. Age standardized data for incidence and mortality were generated and compared across age groups. It was determined that during the studied period 45,891 new cases of breast cancer were registered and 20,122 women died of this pathology. Average breast cancer incidence and mortality were $37.9{\pm}1.10/10^5$ and $16.7{\pm}0.20/10^5$ respectively, and the overall ratio of mortality/incidence (M/I) was 0.44. Incidence tended to increase (T = + 2.3%), and mortality to decrease (T of =-0.3%). Peaks of incidence and mortality were noted in those aged 60-74 years and 75-84, respectively. Particularly high incidences were established in large cities of Kazakhstan, Astana ($46.8{\pm}1.80/10^5$) and Almaty ($49.7{\pm}1.30/10^5$), and high mortality was observed in the Pavlodar region ($17.9{\pm}0.60/10^5$) and Almaty city ($20.1{\pm}0.40/10^5$). Considerable variation in the mortality/incidence ratio was noted, suggesting the need for more stress on access to screening and clinical care in some regions of the country.

Analysis of Esophageal Cancer Time Trends in China, 1989-2008

  • Zhao, Jun;He, Yu-Tong;Zheng, Rong-Shou;Zhang, Si-Wei;Chen, Wan-Qing
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.13 no.9
    • /
    • pp.4613-4617
    • /
    • 2012
  • National cancer incidence data were utilized to analyze trends in esophageal cancer incidence in China in order to provide basic information for making cancer control strategy. We retrieved and re-sorted valid esophageal cancer incidence data from National Central Cancer Registry Database over 20 years period from 1989 to 2008. Crude incidence and age-standardized incidence rates were calculated for analysis, with annual percent change estimated by Joinpoint software for long term trend analysis. The crude incidence rate of esophageal cancer was found to have remained relatively stable in both urban and rural areas over the 20 year period. Age standardized incidence rate (ASR) in cancer registration areas decreased from 39.5/100,000 in 1989 to 23.0/100,000 in 2008 in all areas (AAPC=-3.3%, 95% CI:-2.8~-3.7). The trend was no change in urban areas and 2.1% average annual decrease observed in rural aras. Before the year of 2000, esophageal cancer incidence rates significant decreased with 2.8% annually and then the rates kept stable. Over 20 years from 1989 to 2008, esophageal cancer age standardized incidence rate in cancer registration areas decreased with time. However, esophageal cancer is still a big issue and efforts for control should be continuously enhanced. Cancer registration is playing an important role in cancer control with the number of registries increasing and data quality improving in China.