• Title, Summary, Keyword: human remains

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Detecting buried human remains using near-surface geophysical instruments

  • Powell Kathryn
    • Geophysics and Geophysical Exploration
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    • v.7 no.1
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    • pp.88-92
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    • 2004
  • To improve the recovery rate of unlocated buried human remains in forensic investigations, there is scope to evaluate and develop techniques that are applicable to the Australian environment. I established controlled gravesites (comprising shallow buried kangaroos, pigs, and human cadavers) in South Australia, to allow the methodical testing of remote sensing equipment for the purpose of grave detection in forensic investigations. Eight-month-old pig graves are shown to provide more distinct identifying results using ground-penetrating radar when compared to four-year-old kangaroo graves. Two further aspects of this research are presented: information (obtained from a survey) relating to the police use of geophysical instruments for locating buried human remains, and the use of electrical resistivity for locating human remains buried in a coffin. The survey of Australian police jurisdictions, covering the period 1995-2000, showed that police searches for unlocated bodies have not successfully located human remains using any geophysical instruments (such as ground-penetrating radar, magnetometers, or electrical resistivity). Lower resistivity readings were found coincident with the 150-year-old single historical burial in a heavily excavated field, in a situation where its exact location was previously unknown.

The Study on the Actual Condition of the Clothing Remains in the Museums of the Jeollado Region (전라도 소재 박물관의 복식유물(服飾遺物) 현황 연구)

  • Hong, Jeong-Hwa;Im, Sang-Im
    • Korean Journal of Human Ecology
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    • v.10 no.4
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    • pp.365-378
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    • 2001
  • This study aims to investigate the situation of clothing remains in the museums located in Jeolla Province and the problems appeared in the exhibitions, management and safekeeping in order to provide the basic data of costume studies which contribute to understanding our inherent clothing culture. The method of this study included classification of the clothing remains of the thirteen museums in Jeolla province according to the system used in the National Museum of Korea, the research data was analyzed by using charts. The result of this study is as following : The total of 8696 clothing remains were inspected, and these were consisted of 78% ornaments, 9.4% clothings, 5.4% hats, 4.4% shoes, 1.8% belts and buckles, 1.0% boxes for hats and clothes.

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Genetic Characterization of microorganism from Human Remains in the Joseon Period (조선 시대 인골로부터 분리한 미생물의 유전학적 특성연구 - 김포 장기지구 토광묘 출토 인골을 중심으로)

  • Cho, Eun-Min;Kang, So-yeong;Kwon, Eun-Sil;Jee, Sang-Hyun
    • 보존과학연구
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    • pp.69-77
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    • 2010
  • Preservation of artifacts that are excavated from archeological sites is closely related to soil environment. Biological remains are especially influenced by degradation activity of microorganism from soil environment. In this study a preserved human bone in archaeological tomb, Tou-kwang-myo from Joseon Period was analyzed to characterize bacteria groups by molecular genetic tools using 16S rDNA sequences. 117 clones were identified and classified 9 phylogenetic groups : ${\alpha}$-, ${\beta}$-, ${\gamma}$-, ${\delta}$-Proteobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Clostridia, Actinobacteridae, Nitrospiraceae, and Gemmatimonadetes according to homologous 16S rDNA sequences submitted in NCBI. ${\gamma}$-Proteobacteria group appears the highest ratio in bones (about 35%) while about 19.6% belong to the Actinobacteria group. The results may contribute to study on the effect of microorganisms on the human remains with burial method.

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Analysis of Human Skeletal Remains of the Joseon Dynasty from Hwamyeong-dong, Busan: A Molecular Genetic Approach (분자유전학적 접근을 통한 조선시대 사람뼈의 분석 - 부산 화명동 조선시대 분묘군 출토 사람뼈를 중심으로 -)

  • Kim, Sue Hoon;Cho, Eun Min;Kim, Yun-Ji;Choe, Hyeongoo;Kang, Soyeong
    • Journal of Conservation Science
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    • v.34 no.1
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    • pp.1-9
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    • 2018
  • The analysis of ancient DNA extracted from archaeological bones has become an important research tool in palaeogenetics and anthropology. Eight human skeletal remains of the Joseon dynasty, excavated from Hwamyeong-dong, were used in this study. DNA was extracted from bone powder using a silica-based protocol. The isolated DNA was analyzed by the sequencing variation of hyper-variable region of the mitochondrial DNA. In the present study, 3 human remains were identified into mtDNA haplogroups including the A 5a, D4a, and M4"67+16311 groups, using HaploGrep 2 program. The identified haplotypes of the 3 samples have been confirmed that the specimens in the tombs were not related by the maternal line. This is the first analysis of human skeletal remains of the Joseon dynasty excavated in Busan. Date from the analysis of human remains from the Joseon dynasty are considered as the basis for understanding the genetic relationship between modern and ancient humans of the Korean peninsula.

Mitochondrial DNA Analysis of Human Skeletal Remains Excavated from Myungam-ri site in Asan, Korea (아산시 명암리 출토 인골의 미토콘드리아 DNA 분석)

  • Kim, Yun-Ji;Kim, Sue-Hoon;Cho, Eun-Min;Lee, Jeong-won
    • 보존과학연구
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    • pp.33-48
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    • 2015
  • In this study, ancient DNA analyses were carried out on the human skeletal remains from a historical cemetery site in Myeongam-ri, Asan, Korea. Human remains of 27 individuals out of tombs from the Goryeo to Joseon Dynasty were selected for the analysis of this study. In order to identify the genealogy of the population and traditional burial pattern of the cemetery, we conducted comparative analyses of the hyper variable regions (HVRs) in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of each sample. We sequenced 9 segmental amplicons of HVRs and assigned relevant haplogroups according to the sequence polymorphism on the basis of the known mtDNA database. As a result, we were analyses 18 human remains of 27 individuals and result of amelogenin analysis were only 4 samples.

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The Paleoparasitology in Brazil and Findings in Human Remains from South America: A Review

  • Novo, Shenia Patricia Correa;Ferreira, Luiz Fernando
    • The Korean Journal of Parasitology
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    • v.54 no.5
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    • pp.573-583
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    • 2016
  • The review article presents some of the history of how paleoparasitology started in Brazil, making highlight the great responsible Dr. Luiz Fernando Ferreira and Dr. Adauto Araujo, the trajectory of paleoparasitology in Brazil since 1978 and its performance in science to the present day. In sequence, it is made a presentation of parasitological findings on human remains found in archaeological sites in South America, highlighting Brazil, Argentina, Chile, and Peru, where major discoveries have occurred. Many of the parasites found in archaeological material and mentioned in this review went out of Africa with the peopling of Europe and from there they dispersed around the world, where climatic conditions allow the transmission. However, humans have acquired other parasites of animals, since humans invaded new habitats or creating new habits adopting new technologies, thus expanding its range of influence on the environment. Thus, this review article is finalized with information that explain the importance of these findings in the interaction between parasites, human host, and ambient.

Personal identification of the excavated ancient human bone through molecular-biological methods (분자생물학적 방법을 통한 출토인골의 개인 동정-사천 늑도 출토 인골과 민통선 민묘 출토 인골을 중심으로)

  • Seo, Min-Seok;Lee, Kyu-Shik;Chung, Yong-Jae;Lee, Myeong-Hui
    • 보존과학연구
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    • pp.27-40
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    • 2001
  • DNA typing is often used to determine identity from human remains. Recently, the molecular biological analysis of ancient deposits has become possible since methods for the recovery of DNA conserved in bones or teeth from archaeological remains have been developed. In the field of archaeology, one of the most promising approaches is to identify the individuals present in a mass burial site. We performed nuclear DNA typing and mitochondrial DNA sequencing analysis based on PCR from a Korea ancient human remain excavated from Sa-chon Nuk-island and civilian access controlline(CACL). A femur bone were collected and successfully subjected to DNA extraction, quantification, PCR amplification, and subsequently typed for several shot tandem repeat(STR)loci. 4 types of STR systems used in this study were CTT multiplex(CSF1PO, TPOX, TH01), FFv multiplex(F13A01, FESFPS, vWA), Silver STRⅢ multiplex(D16S539, D7S820, D13S317), and amelogenin for sex determination. This studies are primarily concerned with the extraction, amplification, and DNA typing of ancient human bone DNA samples. Also, it is suggestive of importance about closely relationship between both fields of archaeology and molecular biology.

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Why Standard Measures of Human Capital are Misleading

  • HANUSHEK, ERIC A.
    • KDI Journal of Economic Policy
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    • v.37 no.2
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    • pp.22-39
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    • 2015
  • After a long, dormant period, recent attention has turned to a variety of measurement issues surrounding the concept of human capital. The traditional approach of rely entirely on measures of school attainment, while convenient, is almost certainly misleading. The availability of cognitive skills measures greatly improves on these measurements, but there remains also concern about other unmeasured factors, including noncognitive skills. This paper considers alternative approaches to assessing the role of human capital on individual earnings and on economic growth.

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Forensically Important Blow Flies Chrysomya pinguis, C. villeneuvi, and Lucilia porphyrina (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a Case of Human Remains in Thailand

  • Monum, Tawatchai;Sukontason, Kabkaew L.;Sribanditmongkol, Pongruk;Sukontason, Kom;Samerjai, Chutharat;Limsopatham, Kwankamol;Suwannayod, Suttida;Klong-klaew, Tunwadee;Wannasan, Anchalee
    • The Korean Journal of Parasitology
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    • v.55 no.1
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    • pp.71-76
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    • 2017
  • This is the first study to report Chrysomya pinguis (Walker) and Lucilia porphyrina (Walker) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) as forensically important blow fly species from human cadavers in Thailand, in addition to Chrysomya villeneuvi (Patton) already known in Thailand. In 2016, a fully decomposed body of an unknown adult male was discovered in a high mountainous forest during winter in Chiang Mai province. The remains were infested heavily with thousands of blow fly larvae feeding simultaneously on them. Morphological identification of adults reared from the larvae, and molecular analysis based on sequencing of 1,247 bp partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (CO1) of the larvae and puparia, confirmed the above mentioned 3 species. The approving forensic fly evidence by molecular approach was described for the first time in Thailand. Moreover, neighbor-joining phylogenetic analysis of the CO1 was performed to compare the relatedness of the species, thereby affirming the accuracy of identification. As species of entomofauna varies among cases in different geographic and climatic circumstances, C. pinguis and L. porphyrina were added to the list of Thai forensic entomology caseworks, including colonizers of human remains in open, high mountainous areas during winter. Further research should focus on these 3 species, for which no developmental data are currently available.