• Title, Summary, Keyword: host plants

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Host Plants of Metcalfa pruinosa (Say) (Hemiptera: Flatidae) Nymph and Adult (미국선녀벌레 유충과 성충의 기주)

  • Seo, Hwa-Young;Park, Deog-Kee;Hwang, In-Su;Choi, Yong-Seok
    • Korean journal of applied entomology
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    • v.58 no.4
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    • pp.363-380
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    • 2019
  • Previous studies on the host plant range of Metcalfa pruinosa were conducted without distinguishing between its stages of development. In this study, we investigated host plants by studying the nymph and adult development stages of M. pruinosa. M. pruinosa nymphs were found on host plants that belong to 78 families and 227 species, and, to the best of our knowledge, host plants that belong to 27 families and 38 species have been reported for the first time. The host plants were divided into woody and herbaceous at the nymph stage of M. pruinosa, and the nymphs were found in 110 herbaceous and 117 woody species. M. pruinosa adults were found on host plants that belong to 87 families and 233 species, and, host plants that belong to 26 families and 36 species have been reported for the first time. The host plants were divided into woody and herbaceous at the adult stage of M. pruinosa, and the adults were found in 105 herbaceous and 128 woody species. Therefore, the total domestic host plant of M. pruinosa was 98 families 345 species. The nymph and adult in preoviposition stage prefer Helianthus annuus and the adult in oviposition stage prefer Persicaria tinctoria and Rosa rugosa.

Vegetation of Golf Courses and Local Difference of Feeding Host Plant to Adoretus tenuimaculatus Waterhouse (골프장 식생과 주둥무늬차색풍뎅이 (Adoretus tenuimaculatus Waterhouse)가해 기주식물의 지역적 차이)

  • Lee, Dong-Woon;Choo, Ho-Yul;Chung, Jae-Min;Lee, Sang-Myeong;Huh, Jin;Sung, Young-Tak
    • Asian Journal of Turfgrass Science
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    • v.12 no.1
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    • pp.1-16
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    • 1998
  • Vegetation of golf courses and local difference of feeding host plants of brown chafer, Adoretus tenuimaculatus Waterhouse(Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) were investigated in golf courses. Yongwon country club in Chinhae and Tongdo country club in Yangsan Gyeongnarn, Dongrae Benest golf club in Kumjeunggu Pusan and Daegu country club in Gyeongsan Gyeongbuk province from 1995 to 1997. Vegetation and species of feeding host plant were different depending on observed place. Damaged rate of host plants were concerned with ornamental trees and natural growing host plants, and Oenothera odorata, Achyranthes japonica, Aralia elata, Viburnum awabuki, Chenapadium album var. cent rorubrum, Cornus officinalis, and Rhododendron mucronulatum were newly recorded as host plant of A. tenuimaculatus in this study. Thus, host plants of A. tenuimaculatus were 193 kinds in 48 families. Key words: Brown chafer, Adoretus tenuimaculatus, host plant, vegetation, insect-plant interaction, biological control, golf courses.

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Newly Listed Host Plants of Ectinohoplia rufipes in Korean Golf Courses (골프장에서 주황긴다리풍뎅이(Ectinohoplia rufipes)의 신 기주 식물)

  • Lee, Sang-Myeong;Lee, Dong-Woon;Chung, Jae-Min;Kim, Young-Sub
    • Asian Journal of Turfgrass Science
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    • v.22 no.2
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    • pp.179-184
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    • 2008
  • Host plants of Ectinohoplia rufipes (Mitschulsky) were investigated in golf courses in Gapyeong, Gyeonggi. Ten plant species in 7 families were observed to be fed on from golf courses. Thus, total number of host plants of Ectinohoplia rufipes were 94 species in 30 families. Rhododendron indicum and Rhododendron japonicum for. flavum in Ericaceae, Euonymus alata for. ciliato-dentatus in Celastraceae, Ulmus davidiana for. suberosa in Ulmaceae, Malus pumila var. dulcissima and Malus baccata in Rosaceae, Weigela florida for. subricdor in Caprifoliaceae, Betula platyphylla var. japonica in Betulaceae, Salix purpurea var. japonica in Salicaceae, and Quercus palustris in Fagaceae were newly listed host plants of Ectinohoplia rufipes in golf courses. Betula platyphylla var. japonica, Malus pumila var. dulcissima and Quercus palustris were heavily damaged host plants of Ectinohoplia rufipes.

Parasitic Behaviour of Xanthopimpla pedator Fabricius (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) on Tropical Tasar Silkworm, Antheraea mylitta Drury (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) Reared on Seven Forestry Host Plants in Uttarakhand, India

  • Bhatia, Narendra Kumar;Yousuf, Mohammad
    • International Journal of Industrial Entomology
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    • v.27 no.2
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    • pp.243-264
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    • 2013
  • Antheraea mylitta Drury is a commercial silk producing forest insect in India and Xanthopimpla pedator Fabricius is its larval-pupal endoparasitoid, which causes pupal mortality that affects seed production. Effects of host plants, rearing season and their interactions on parasitic behaviour of X. pedator were studied here, as influence of these factors on biological success of X. pedator is not known. Seven forest tree species were tested as food plants for A. mylitta, and rate of pupal parasitization in both the rearing seasons were recorded and analysed. Results showed that rearing season and host plants significantly affected the rate of pupal parasitization in both the sexes. Pupal mortality was found significantly higher (14.52%) in second rearing season than the first (2.89%). Likewise, host plants and rearing seasons significantly affected length, diameter, and shell thickness of cocoons in both sexes. Out of all infested pupae, 85.59% were found male, which indicated that X. pedator chooses male spinning larva of A. mylitta for oviposition, but we could not answer satisfactorily the why and how aspect of this sex specific parasitic behaviour of X. pedator. Multiple regression analysis indicated that length and shell thickness of male cocoons are potential predictors for pupal parasitization rate of X. pedator. Based on highest cocoon productivity and lowest pupal mortality, Terminalia alata, T. tomentosa, and T. arjuna were found to be the most suitable host plants for forest based commercial rearing of A. mylitta in tropical forest areas of Uttarakhand state, where it has never been reared earlier. Sex and season specific interaction of X. pedator with its larval-pupal host, A. mylitta is a novel entomological study to find out explanations for some of the unresolved research questions on parasitic behaviour of X. predator that opens a new area for specialised study on male specific parasitization in Ichneumonidae.

Feeding Plants of Rice Water Weevil (벼물바구미의 가해식물)

  • 김용헌;임경섭
    • Korean journal of applied entomology
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    • v.31 no.2
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    • pp.139-143
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    • 1992
  • Feeding plants of rice water weevil(RWW) adult and larvae were observed. Thirteen families including 104 species were found as host plants of RWW adult, and 74 species of them were newly identified as its host. Thmedia triandra var. japonica, Luzula capitata, Agropyron tsukushiense var. ransiens, and Zoysiama crostachya were most favorable hosts of adult RWW. Host plants for larvae were 9 species of weeds including Cperus nipponicus, Eleccharis kuroguwa, Sagittaria trifolia, and Claviceps purpurea in the rice paddy fields.

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Effect of rearing season, host plants and their interaction on economical traits of tropical tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta Drury- an overview

  • Bhatia, Narendra Kumar;Yousuf, Mohammad
    • International Journal of Industrial Entomology
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    • v.29 no.1
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    • pp.93-119
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    • 2014
  • Tropical tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) is a polyphagous silk producing forest silkworm of commercial importance in India. Forest dependent people rear its larvae on different forestry host plants twice or thrice in a year for small household income. Larvae of A. mylitta feeds on many forest tree species, but always show a great degree of selectivity as a function of its behavioural responses to physical structure and chemical features of the host plants. Cocoon crop of A. mylitta is influenced by heterogeneity of tasar food plants and climatic conditions of the habitat. The role of host plants, temperature, humidity, rainfall, photoperiod and climatic variables on the growth and development of insects have clearly been demonstrated. This article entails an in-depth analysis on ecological and nutritional aspects of A. mylitta, which may provide selective information to researcher and forest managers, who are particularly associated with livelihood improvement of the poor people in forested area through location specific forest insect industry.

Investigating the Metabolism of Clubroot-Infected Plants by Integrating Metabolomic and Transcriptomic Approaches

  • Yahaya, Nazariyah;Malinowski, Robert;Burrell, Mike;Walker, Heather;Petriacq, Pierre;Rolfe, Stephen
    • 한국균학회소식:학술대회논문집
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    • pp.27-27
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    • 2015
  • Clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae) is a serious agricultural problem affecting Brassica crop production worldwide. It also infects the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. During infection, this biotrophic pathogen manipulates the development and metabolism of its host leading to the development of galls in the root and hypocotyl. In turn, its own development is strongly influenced by the host. The aim of this study is to investigate the metabolism of clubroot-infected plants using a combination of transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches. We have used direct injection mass spectrometry to obtain a metabolic fingerprint of when changes in the metabolome occur and linked this with changes in host and pathogen gene expression. We have identified alterations in carbohydrate metabolism that occur during P. brassicae infection of A. thaliana plants. Transcriptomic analysis showed that host genes associated with sugar transport and metabolism were induced during gall formation and that the pathogen also expresses genes associated with these processes. We have examined the impact of inactivating host sucrose synthase, cytosolic invertase and sugar permeases on gall formation, identifying host genes that are required for gall formation. We have also explored how sugar status is changed in root tissue, developing and mature leaf during infection of wild type and mutant plants.

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Powdery Mildew Fungi and Their Host Plants from Kangwon Province (강원도(江原道)에서 채집(採集)한 흰가루병균(病菌)과 기주식물(寄主植物))

  • Shin, Hyeon-Dong
    • The Korean Journal of Mycology
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    • v.22 no.3
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    • pp.229-246
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    • 1994
  • Powdery mildew fungi from 246 different species of host plants were collected at Kangwon province during 1989-1993 years. They were identified and classified into 13 genera and 83 species by examining various morphological characteristics of taxonomic value. Most of host plants were infected with one species of powdery mildew fungus, but eight plant species with two or three different mildews. Among 246 host plants collected, 43 species were added as the new host plants of powdery mildew fungi in Korea. Two Oidium spp. from Hibiscus and several Compositae plants were described to suggest their taxonomic problems.

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Effects of Host plant, Nectar plant and Vegetation types on Butterfly Communities (먹이식물·흡밀식물·식생이 나비 군집에 미치는 영향)

  • Kim, Do Sung;Cho, Young Bok;Jeong, Jong Chul
    • Korean journal of applied entomology
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    • v.51 no.4
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    • pp.331-342
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    • 2012
  • The effects of number of host plants and nectar plants on the number and diversity of butterflies were monitored and analyzed by simple and multiple regression from May 2008 to Sep 2009 in the Bubjusa region (Mt. Sokri, Boeun-gun, Chungcheongbuk-do), which was divided into four regions. The results demonstrate that the number of butterflies has a positive correlation with the number of host plant species, the number of nectar plant species, and the number of host plants multiple regression analysis. The number of butterflies also increased habitat area. However, the butterfly species number and diversity index showed lower correlation with the number of host plants and the area size of the divided region, respectively, when analyzed by simple regression. In addition, increased species diversity in a region with more diverse plant flora. These results suggest that the composite distribution of host and nectar plants with diverse plant flora is required for butterfly diversity and population preservation. Additionally, it also suggest that vegetation types complementarity all factors.

Host Plants of Popillia quadriguttata (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) (녹색콩풍뎅이(Popillia quadriguttata)의 기주식물)

  • 이동운;추호렬;정재민;이상명;사공영보
    • Korean journal of applied entomology
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    • v.41 no.1
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    • pp.15-19
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    • 2002
  • Host plants of Popillia quadriguttata (Fabricius) were investigated in golf courses, Fifteen plant species of 15 genera in 13 families were confirmed as host plants of P. quadriguttata. Thus, total number of host plants of P. quadriguttata was 26 species of 25 genera in 18 families including 11 recorded species in literature. In addition, P. quadriguttata adults fed on 30 plant species of 25 genera in 19 families out of the 69 plant species of 53 genera in 33 families supplied as food in laboratory, P. quadriguttata adults preferred Wistaria floribunda in golf courses but Tilia mandshuric, Platanus orientalis, Diospyros lotus, Punica granatum and Chionanthus retusa in laboratory.