• Title, Summary, Keyword: gestational trophoblastic neoplasia

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Quality of Life in Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia Patients after Treatment in Thailand

  • Leenharattanarak, Pattaramon;Lertkhachonsuk, Ruangsak
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.24
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    • pp.10871-10874
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    • 2015
  • Background: Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is a malignant disease which occurs in women of reproductive age. Treatment of GTN has an excellent outcome and further pregnancies can be expected. However, data concerning quality of life in these cancer survivor patients are limited. This study aimed to assess quality of life in women who were diagnosed with GTN and remission after treatment, and to determine factors that may affect quality of life status. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted from July 2013 to May 2014 in the Gestational Trophoblastic Disease Clinic, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Patients who were diagnosed GTN and complete remission were recruited. Data collection was accomplished by interview with two sets of questionnaires, one general covering demographic data and the other focusing on quality of life, the fourth version of Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT-G). Descriptive statistics were used to determine general data and quality of life scores. Students t-test and one way ANOVA were used to compare between categorical and continuous data. Results: Forty four patients were enrolled in this study. The overall mean quality of life score (FACT-G) was 98.2. The overall FACT-G score was not significantly correlated with age, education level, stage of disease, treatment modalities, and time interval from remission to enrollment. However, patients who needed further fertility showed significant lower FACT-G scores in the emotional well-being domain (p=0.02). Conclusions: Overall quality of life scores in post-treatment gestational trophoblastic neoplasia patients are in the mild impairment range. Patients who desire fertility suffer lower quality of life in the emotional well-being domain.

Resistant Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia Patients Treated with 5-Fluouracil plus Actinomycin D

  • Manopunya, Manatsawee;Suprasert, Prapaporn
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.1
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    • pp.387-390
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    • 2012
  • A combination of 5-fluorouracil plus actinomycin D (5FU plus Act D) is the regimen that has been commonly administered to Chinese and Japanese gestational trophoblastic neoplasia patients as the first or second line of treatment with an excellent outcome. However, the efficacy of this regimen in a salvage setting was unclear. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the 5 FU plus Act D regimen utilized in this condition, all GTN patients resistant to at least three previous chemotherapy regimens who received the 5 FU plus Act D regimen between August 2009 and January 2011 at Chiang Mai University Hospital were reviewed. There were five cases who met the criteria. Four of those patients were in FIGO stage III to IV with a WHO scoring of more than 12. The median number of cycles for each patient was two and only one case achieved remission while four of the cases were unresponsive. The toxicity was evaluated in 12 cycles. Common complications were uncomplicated myelosuppression and mucositis. In conclusion, this regimen revealed modest efficacy in a salvage setting with manageable toxicity.

Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) Regression Curve for Predicting Response to EMA/CO (Etoposide, Methotrexate, Actinomycin D, Cyclophosphamide and Vincristine) Regimen in Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia

  • Rattanaburi, Athithan;Boonyapipat, Sathana;Supasinth, Yuthasak
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.12
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    • pp.5037-5041
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    • 2015
  • Background: An hCG regression curve has been used to predict the natural history and response to chemotherapy in gestational trophoblastic disease. We constructed hCG regression curves in high-risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) treated with EMA/CO and identified an optimal hCG level to detect EMA/CO resistance in GTN. Materials and Methods: Eighty-one women with GTN treated with EMA/CO were classified as primary high-risk GTN (n = 65) and single agent-resistance GTN (n = 16). The hCG levels prior to each course of chemotherapy were plotted in the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles to construct the hCG regression curves. Diagnostic performance was evaluated for an optimal cut-off value. Results: The median hCG levels were 264,482 mIU/mL mIU/mL and 495.5 mIU/mL mIU/mL for primary high-risk GTN and single agent-resistance GTN, respectively. The 50th percentile of the hCG level in primary high-risk GTN and single agent-resistance turned to normal before the 4th and the 2nd course of chemotherapy, respectively. The 90th percentile of the hCG level in primary high-risk GTN and single agent-resistance turned to normal before the 9th and the 2nd course of chemotherapy, respectively. The hCG level of ${\geq}118.6mIU/mL$ mIU/mL at the 5thcourse of EMA/CO predicted the EMA/CO resistance in primary high-risk GTN patients with a sensitivity of 85.7% and a specificity of 100%. Conclusion: EMA/CO resistance in primary high-risk GTN can be predicted by using an hCG regression curve in combination with the cut-off value of 118.6 mIU/mL at the 5thcourse of chemotherapy.

Outcomes of Non-Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia: Twelve Year Experience from a Northern Thailand Tertiary Care Center

  • Suprasert, Prapaporn;Manopunya, Manatsawee
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.14
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    • pp.5913-5916
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    • 2015
  • Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is the malignant form of gestational trophoblastic disease. In non-metastatic GTN, the outcomes of treatment are impressive with methotrexate (MTX) or actinomycin D. We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of non-metastatic GTN treated at our center from January, 1999 to December, 2013. One hundred and nine patients were recruited to the study. The median age was 33.1 years and over 90% were referral cases. Abnormal vaginal symptoms developed in 37.6% while 56.4% were asymptomatic. The most common antecedent pregnancy was a complete mole (92.7%) with the median interval time from antecedent pregnancy to GTN development being 2.0 months. The median pretreatment B-hCG was 5,624 mIu/ml. The most common first line treatment was methotrexate (MTX) and folinic acid (91.7%) followed by weekly MTX (4.6%), etoposide+ MTX+actinomycin D (EMA) (2.8%), and actinomycin D (0.9%), with the median number of cycles at 5.0. The positive response to first line chemotherapy was 73.8%. The patients were given subsequent chemotherapeutic regimens after resistance to the first line therapy and showed a final remission rate of 89.9%.The significant factor that was frequently found in patients who were non-responders to the first line treatment was a hysterectomy procedure. Two patients developed lung metastasis and brain metastasis at one and four years after the first treatment, respectively. In conclusion, the outcomes of non-metastatic GTN were excellent. However, the patients need long term follow up due to the possibility of developing multiple organ metastases.

Outcomes of Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia: Fourteen Year Experience from a Northern Thailand Tertiary Care Center

  • Suprasert, Prapaporn;Siriaree, Sitthicha;Manopunya, Manatsawee
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.3
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    • pp.1357-1362
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    • 2016
  • Metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is an uncommon cancer. The principal treatment consists of chemotherapy with or without surgery or radiotherapy. We here retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of metastatic GTN treated at our institute between January, 1999 and December, 2013. Sixty-three patients met the criteria. The median age was 30.0 years and almost 90% were referral cases. Nearly 40% of the studied patients presented with vaginal bleeding while 22.2% were asymptomatic. The most common antecedent pregnancy was hydatidiform mole (57.1%) followed by term pregnancy (20.6%). The median interval time from antecedent pregnancy to the development of GTN was three months and the median pretreatment B-hCG was 58,274 mIU/ml. Stage III (74.6%) was the most common staging followed by stage IV (20.6%) and stage II (4.8%). The most frequent surgery was hysterectomy (31.7%). Thoracotomy and craniotomy were performed in three and two patients, respectively. The most common first line chemotherapy regimen was methotrexate and folinic acid (36.5%) followed by EMA (etoposide, methotrexate, actinomycin D) (34.9%), EMACO (etoposide, methotrexate, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, vincristine) (17.5%) with the remission rate of 66.7%. Nearly one-third of the patients were given a subsequent chemotherapy regimen after failure with the first line therapy and showed a final response rate of 73.0%. However, in stage IV, the response to first line treatment was only 38.5%. In conclusion, the outcomes of metastatic GTN were poor especially with the higher stages.

Treatment results of the second-line chemotherapy regimen for patients with low-risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia treated with 5-day methotrexate and 5-day etoposide

  • Kanno, Toshiyuki;Matsui, Hideo;Akizawa, Yoshika;Usui, Hirokazu;Shozu, Makio
    • Journal of Gynecologic Oncology
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    • v.29 no.6
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    • pp.89.1-89.8
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    • 2018
  • Objective: Highly effective chemotherapy for patients with low-risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is associated with almost a 100% cure rate. However, 20%-30% of patients treated with chemotherapy need to change their regimens due to severe adverse events (SAEs) or drug resistance. We examined the treatment outcomes of second-line chemotherapy for patients with low-risk GTN. Methods: Between 1980 and 2015, 281 patients with low-risk GTN were treated. Of these 281 patients, 178 patients were primarily treated with 5-day intramuscular methotrexate (MTX; n=114) or 5-day drip infusion etoposide (ETP; n=64). We examined the remission rates, the drug change rates, and the outcomes of second-line chemotherapy. Results: The primary remission rates and drug resistant rates of 5-day ETP were significantly higher (p<0.001) and significantly lower (p=0.002) than those of 5-day MTX, respectively. Forty-seven patients (26.4%) required a change in their chemotherapy regimen due to the SAEs (n=16) and drug resistance (n=31), respectively. Of these 47 patients failed the first-line regimen, 39 patients (39/47, 82.9%) were re-treated with single-agent chemotherapy, and 35 patients (35/39, 89.7%) achieved remission. Four patients failed second-line, single-agent chemotherapy and eight patients (17.0%) who failed first-line regimens were treated with combined or multi-agent chemotherapy and achieved remission. Conclusions: Patients with low-risk GTN were usually treated with single-agent chemotherapy, while 20%-30% patients had to change their chemotherapy regimen due to SAEs or drug resistance. The second-line regimens of single-agent chemotherapy were effective; however, there were several patients who needed multiple agents and combined chemotherapy to achieve remission.

Treatment of Extremely High Risk and Resistant Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia Patients in King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital

  • Oranratanaphan, Shina;Lertkhachonsuk, Ruangsak
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.2
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    • pp.925-928
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    • 2014
  • Background: Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is a spectrum of disease with abnormal trophoblastic proliferation. Treatment is based on FIGO stage and WHO risk factor scores. Patients whose score is 12 or more are considered as at extremely high risk with a high likelihood of resistance to first line treatment. Optimal therapy is therefore controversial. Objective: This study was conducted in order to summarize the regimen used for extremely high risk or resistant GTN patients in our institution the in past 10 years. Materials and Methods: All the charts of GTN patients classified as extremely high risk, recurrent or resistant during 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2011 were reviewed. Criteria for diagnosis of GTN were also assessed to confirm the diagnosis. FIGO stage and WHO risk prognostic score were also re-calculated to ensure the accuracy of the information. Patient characteristics were reviewed in the aspects of age, weight, height, BMI, presenting symptoms, metastatic area, lesions, FIGO stage, WHO risk factor score, serum hCG level, treatment regimen, adjuvant treatments, side effects and response to treatment, including disease free survival. Results: Eight patients meeting the criteria of extremely high risk or resistant GTN were included in this review. Mean age was 33.6 years (SD=13.5, range 17-53). Of the total, 3 were stage III (37.5%) and 5 were stage IV (62.5%). Mean duration from previous pregnancies to GTN was 17.6 months (SD 9.9). Mean serum hCG level was 864,589 mIU/ml (SD 98,151). Presenting symptoms of the patients were various such as hemoptysis, abdominal pain, headache, heavy vaginal bleeding and stroke. The most commonly used first line chemotherapeutic regimen in our institution was the VAC regimen which was given to 4 of 8 patients in this study. The most common second line chemotherapy was EMACO. Adjuvant radiation was given to most of the patients who had brain metastasis. Most of the patients have to delay chemotherapy for 1-2 weeks due to grade 2-3 leukopenia and require G-CSF to rescue from neutropenia. Five form 8 patients were still survived. Mean of disease free survival was 20.4 months. Two patients died of the disease, while another one patient died from sepsis of pressure sore wound. None of surviving patients developed recurrence of disease after complete treatment. Conclusions: In extremely high risk GTN patients, main treatment is multi-agent chemotherapy. In our institution, we usually use VAC as a first line treatment of high risk GTN, but since resistance is quite common, this may not suitable for extremely high risk GTN patients. The most commonly used second line multi-agent chemotherapy in our institution is EMA-CO. Adjuvant brain radiation was administered to most of the patients with brain metastasis in our institution. The survival rate is comparable to previous reviews. Our treatment demonstrated differences from other institutions but the survival is comparable. The limitation of this review is the number of cases is small due to rarity of the disease. Further trials or multicenter analyses may be considered.

Epidemiology of Hydatidiform Moles in a Tertiary Hospital in Thailand over Two Decades: Impact of the National Health Policy

  • Wairachpanich, Varangkana;Limpongsanurak, Sompop;Lertkhachonsuk, Ruangsak
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.18
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    • pp.8321-8325
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    • 2016
  • Background: The incidence of hydatidiform mole (HM) differs among regions but has declined significantly over time. In Thailand, the initiation of universal health coverage in 2002 has resulted in a change of medical services countrywide. However, impacts of these policies on gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) cases in Thailand have not been reported. This study aimed to find the incidence of hydatidiform mole (HM) in King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital (KCMH) from 1994-2013, comparing before and after the implementation of the universal coverage health policy. Materials and Methods: All cases of GTD in KCMH from 1994-2013 were reviewed from medical records. The incidence of HM, patient characteristics, treatment and remission rates were compared over two study decades between 1994-2003 and 2004-2013. Results: Hydatidiform mole cases decreased from 204 cases in the first decade to 111 cases in the seond decade. Overall incidence of HM was 1.70 per 1,000 deliveries. The incidence of HM in the first and second decades were 1.70 and 1.71 per 1,000 deliveries, respectively (p=0.65, 95%CI 1.54-1.88). Referred cases of nonmolar gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) increased from 12 (4.4%) to 23 (14.4%, p<0.01). Vaginal bleeding was the most common presenting symptom which decreased from 89.4% to 79.6% (p=0.02). Asymptomatic HM patients increased from 4.8% to 10.2% (p=0.07). Rate of postmolar GTN was 26%. Conclusions: The number of HM cases in this study decreased over 2 decades but incidence was unchanged. Referral rates of malignant cases were more common after universal health coverage policy initiation. Classic clinical presentation was decreased significantly in the last decade.

Solitary Pulmonary Metastasis of Gestational Choriocarcinoma -Three Cases of Different Types- (임신성 융모상피암의 고립성 폐전이 -3가지 유형-)

  • Yoo, Se-Hwa;Yoo, Zin-Mock;Cho, Jae-Yeon;In, Kwang-Ho
    • Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases
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    • v.39 no.1
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    • pp.79-82
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    • 1992
  • Gestational choriocarcinoma is a highly malignant tumor which arises from the trophoblast of human pregnancy. This tumor develops early pulmonary metastasis and the most common pattern of pulmonary metastasis is discrete multiple nodules. But occasionally solitary pulmonary metastasis occurs. Authors presented three cases of choriocarcinoma presented with different types of solitary pulmonary metastases with review of literatures. We emphasize the importance of careful obstetric history taking and screening of serum gonadotropin level in differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary lesion especially among women who are from areas of high prevalence of trophoblastic neoplasia.

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