• Title, Summary, Keyword: flavor components

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Volatile Flavor Components from Traditional Cultivars of Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia N.) (재래종 배의 휘발성 향기성분)

  • Park, Eun-Ryong;Choi, Jin-Ho;Kim, Kyong-Su
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
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    • v.34 no.2
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    • pp.180-185
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    • 2002
  • Volatile flavor components in three pear varieties (Pyrus pyriforia N.) of traditional cultivar, Bongri, Hwangsilri and Yongmokri, were collected by SDE method using the mixture of n-pentane and diethylether as an extract solvent and were identified by GC/MS. Among 97 compounds identified from all varieties, there were 72, 58 and 66 components in Bongri, Hwangsilri and Yongmokri, respectively. Ethyl acetate was the dominant constituent in all cultivars and also volatile profiles contained large quantity of ethanol and acetic acid. Butyl acetate identified as a main component in Bongri was not found in other pears, but in Hwangrilri and Yongmokri only 4 to 5 esters played important role in total volatile flavor composition. The volatile profiles of these three varieties were characterized by compounds in group of aldehydes, esters, alcohols, acids and ketones. As classified by functional group of separated and identified components, esters and alcohols in Bongri, alcohols in Hwangsilri, and esters in Yongmokri were roled as the title in composition of volatile flavor components. Although small amount, Yongmokri had the highest rate of volatile production at 6.552 mg/kg of pear while Hwangsilri produced the lowest at 4.175 mg/kg of pear.

Volatile flavor components of Jindalrae flower(Korean azalea flower, Rhododendron mucronulatum Turczaninow) (진달래꽃의 휘발성 성분에 관한 연구)

  • Chung, Tae-Yung;Lee, Seung-Eun
    • Applied Biological Chemistry
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    • v.34 no.4
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    • pp.344-352
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    • 1991
  • The whole volatile flavor concentrate obtained from Jindalrae flower was separated into hydrocarbon and oxygen-containing compound(OCC) fractions, and the OCC-fraction was further separated by column chromatography into nine sub-fractions, respectively. These fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography and combined gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. One hundred and sixty-two components, including 61 hydrocarbons, 18 aldehydes, 18 esters, 41 alcohols, 3 ketones, 4 oxides, 8 acids, 6 phenols and 3 miscellaneous components, were identified.

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Volatile Flavor Components of Leek(Allium tuberosum Rottler) (부추(Allium tuberosum Rottler)의 휘발성 향기성분)

  • 김경수;박은령;조정옥;김선민;이명렬
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition
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    • v.27 no.4
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    • pp.563-567
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    • 1998
  • Volatile flavor components of edible portion of leek(Allium tuberosum R.) were extracted by SDE(simultaneous steam distillation and extraction) method using the mixture of n-pentane and diethylether (1 : 1, v/v) as an extract solvent and analyzed by GC-FID and GC/MS. Identification of the volatile flavor components was mostly based on the RI of GC and mass spectrum of GC/MS. A total of sixty-five components from leek extract were classified as 28 sulfur-containing compounds, 12 aldehydes, 9 alcohols, 4 lactones and esters, 3 acids and hydrocarbons, and 2 miscellaneous compouds. The sulfur-containing compounds were predominant in leek extract. Dimethyl disulfide(19.47%) and dimethyl trisulfide(17.38%) were the main compounds and trans-1-propenyl methyl disulfide, trans-2-hexenal and methyl allyl disulfide were also detected large amounts in leek.

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Changes of Volatile Flavor Components on Roasting Conditions in Cassia tora Seeds (결명자 종실의 볶음조건에 따른 향기성분 변화)

  • Kim, Jong-Kuk;Hawer, Woo-Derck;Ha, Jae-Ho;Moon, Kwang-Deok;Chung, Shin-Kyo
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
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    • v.27 no.5
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    • pp.736-741
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    • 1995
  • This study was conducted to investigated the change of volatile flavor components of Cassia tora seeds during roasting treatments. The flavor components of Cassia tora seeds were analyzed by gas chromatography(GC) and combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry(GC/MS). Among the flavor compounds collected by simultaneous steam distillation and extraction(SDE) method, 38 components were separated and identified. They consisted of 3 pyrazines, 4 pyrroles or pyridine, 4 alcohols, 11 aldehydes or ketones, 9 furans or phenols and 7 others. The flavor compounds collected from unroasted Cassia tora seeds were 7 components. During roasting process, many other flavor components were formed and increased in their contents. The contents of pyrazines and furans were highest and increased conspicuously, whereas, the contents of aldehydes, ketones, alcohols and pyridines were not increased significantly.

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Comparison of the Cold-Pressed Peel Oil Composition between ]Korean and Japanese Satsuma Mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marcov. forma Miyagawa-wase) by GC, GC-MS and GC-O

  • Park, Hyang-Sook;Sawamura, Masayoshi
    • Preventive Nutrition and Food Science
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    • v.7 no.1
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    • pp.5-11
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    • 2002
  • The comparison of the volatile flavor components from Korean and Japanese Satsuma mandarin (C. unshiu Marcov. forma Miyagawa-wase) peel oils, isolated by cold-pressing, was performed by gas chromatography, mass-spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O). Eighty-five volatile components were identified in each oil by GC and GC-MS. Forty-three components were detected in each oil by GC-O. The total amount of monoterpene hydrocarbons was 95.88% (Korean mandarin) and 95.29% (Japanese mandarin). Limonene, ${\gamma}$-terpinene, myrcene and $\alpha$-pinene were the main components of the cold-pressed oils from the both samples. The volatile composition of the Japanese mandarin was characterized by a higher content of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, especially bicyclogermacrene, $\alpha$-humullene and valencene. The volatile composition of two samples can easily be distinguished by the percentages of aldehydes, ketones and esters, which were found at higher levels in the Japanese mandarin. The sweet and fruity flavor was stronger in the Korean mandarin oil while herbaceous flavor was stronger in Japanese sample. From GC-O data it is suggested that the sweet and fruity flavor of the Korean mandarin resulted from terpinolene and linalool, and the herbaceous note of the Japanese mandarin from $\alpha$-humullene, nepal, ι-carvone and perill aldehyde.

Effect of Seaweeds and Adsorbents on Volatile Flavor Components of Onion Juice (해조류 및 흡착제의 첨가가 양파즙의 냄새에 미치는 영향)

  • Kee, Hae-Jin;Park, Yang-Kyun
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
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    • v.31 no.6
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    • pp.1477-1483
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    • 1999
  • In order to retain or remove the flavor components of onions, this study was performed to investigate the effect of seaweeds and adsorbents on volatile flavor components of onion juice by testing a sensory evaluation, measuring the amount of pyruvate and thiosulfinate, and investigating the changes of volatile components by SPME/GC. The main flavor compounds in raw onion juice were dipropyl tetrasulfide, 1-propenyl propyl trisulfide, methyl propyl trisulfide, dipropyl trisulfide. Volatile flavor compounds in onion juice treated with tangleweed, brown-seaweed, laver and celite showed a relatively decreasing tendency compared to untreated onion juice, but most of volatile flavor compounds in onion juice treated with activated charcoal and ${\beta}-cyclodextrin$ were removed. The result of the sensory evaluation with various materials for masking onion flavor showed a significant difference at the p<0.05 level. The amount of pyruvate and thiosulfinate treated with tangleweed, brown-seaweed, laver and celite showed little difference compared to untreated onion juice, but the amount of pyruvate and thiosulfinate treated with activated charcoal and ${\beta}-cyclodextrin$ decreased largely compared to untreated onion juice. As a result of the study, onion juice treated with tangleweed, brown-seaweed, laver and celite showed the effect of preserving the pungent taste and masking the onion flavor. Activated charcoal and ${\beta}-cyclodextrin$added to onion juice might have a role in removing the onion flavor by adsorbing volatile flavor compounds in onion.

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Volatile Flavor Components of Bangah (Agastache rugosa O. Kuntze) Herb (방아(Agastache rugosa O. Kuntze)의 향기성분)

  • Ahn, Bin;Yang, Cha-Bum
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
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    • v.23 no.5
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    • pp.582-586
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    • 1991
  • Bangah(Agastache rugosa O. Kuntze), grown in East Asia has very unique and strong flavor, known as wild plant adding to loach soup stock for deodorizing fishy in southern province Korea. In this work, flavor components in essential oil of bangah were analyzed by steam distillation/gaschromatography and identified by gas chromatography/mass selective detector. A total of 32 components were identified in essential oil including 14 hydrocarbons, 6 aldehydes, 5 phenols, 3 alcohol, 2 esters, 5 ketones and 1 other compounds. The major flavor components were estragole, limonene, caryophyllene, eugenol and anethol. It was newly appeared some of aldehydes and sesquiterpenes in ripened bangah. The flower portion was showed more various flavor profiles than leaf and stem. And the respective peak areas were also the largest in flower portion.

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Volatile Flavor Components in Green Tea Blended with Parched Naked Barley (볶은 쌀보리를 혼합한 녹차의 휘발성 향기성분)

  • Choi, Sung-Hee
    • Journal of Life Science
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    • v.22 no.7
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    • pp.981-986
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    • 2012
  • To produce a new tea with a good flavor and functional properties using green tea of low quality, naked barley and barley were selected to blend with the green tea. The simultaneous distillation extraction method (SDE) using Likens and Nickerson's extraction apparatus was used to extract the volatile flavor compounds from the samples. The concentrated flavor extracts were analyzed and identified by GC and GC-MS. The GC patterns of the flavor components in two parched barleys were very different. The main volatile flavor components in two of the samples were alkyl pyrazines. Compounds including 3-methylbutanal, 2-methylbutanal, dihydro-2-methyl-3(2H)-furanone, 2,5-dimethyl pyrazine, and 3-ethyl-2.5-dimethyl pyrazine were isolated from the naked barley. Compounds including thiophenes, thiazoles, sulfides, and pyrroles with burnt odor were isolated from the barley. The parched naked barley was better than barley for adding to green tea. The main aroma components of the green tea blended with the naked barley were hexanol, hexanal, trans-2-hexenal, ${\beta}$-ionone, ${\alpha}$-ionone, alkyl pyrazines, 3-methylbutanal, 2-methylbutanal, and furfural.

Changes of Flavor Compounds in Persimmon Leaves(Diospyros kaki folium) during Growth (감잎의 성장시기별 향기성분의 변화)

  • 김종국;강우원;김귀영;문혜경
    • Journal of the East Asian Society of Dietary Life
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    • v.11 no.6
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    • pp.472-478
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    • 2001
  • This study was conducted to investigate the change in volatile flavor components of persimmon leaves during growth. The flavor components of persimmon leaves were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry(GC/MS). The flavor compounds were collected by simultaneous steam distillation and extraction(SDE) method, and were separated and identified resulting in 126 components, including 23 alcohols, 18 aldehydes, 4 esters. 15 acids, 37 hydrocarbons, 14 ketones, 6 phenols. and 9 others in persimmon leaves. The most abundant components of persimmon leaf were alcohols including iinalool. cis-3-hexanal. 1-$\alpha$ -terpineol. 3.7.11.15-tetramethyl-2-hexadecen-1-ol and aldehydes including trans-2-hexanal. nonanal, 2-decenal and hydrocarbons including 1.1-dimethylethyl cyclohexane, 1-methyl-4-(2-methylpropyl) -benzene. During growth, many other components were formed and dissipated after the 20th of June.

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Volatile Flavor Components of Capsella bursa-pastoris as Influenced by Drying Methods (건조방법에 따른 냉이의 휘발성 향기성분)

  • Lee, Mie-Soon;Choi, Hyang-Sook
    • Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology
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    • v.28 no.5
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    • pp.814-821
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    • 1996
  • An attempt was made to determine the effects of drying methods including shady air drying, presteamed and shady air drying, microwave drying, and freeze drying on the volatile flavor components of Capsella bursapastoris. Essential oils from the samples were isolated by Simultaneous steam distillation-extraction (SDE) method using diethyl ether as solvent. Concentrated samples were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Respective 30, 18, 29, and 26 volatile flavor components were identified in shady air dried samples, presteamed and shady air dried samples, microwave dried samples, and freeze dried samples. The kinds and amounts of volatile flavor components evidently depended upon the drying methods. Trimethyl sulfide was regarded as the most abundant component in shady air dried samples, dimethyl trisulfide in presteamed and shady air dried samples, and phytol in microwave or freeze dried samples.

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