• Title, Summary, Keyword: edible offal

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Genotypic characterization of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from edible offal

  • Son, Se Hyun;Seo, Kwang Won;Kim, Yeong Bin;Noh, Eun Bi;Lee, Keun-Woo;Oh, Tae-Ho;Kim, Seung-Joon;Song, Jae-Chan;Kim, Tae-Wan;Lee, Young Ju
    • Korean Journal of Veterinary Research
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    • v.60 no.3
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    • pp.173-177
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    • 2020
  • Edible offal is easily contaminated by Escherichia coli (E. coli) and fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant E. coli is considered a serious public health problem, thus, this study investigated the genetic characteristics of FQ-resistant E. coli from edible offal. A total of 22 FQ-resistant E. coli isolates were tested. A double mutation in each gyrA and parC led the highest MIC. Four (18.2%) isolates carried plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes. The fimH, eaeA, escV, astA, and iucC genes were confirmed. Seventeen isolates (77.3%) were positive for plasmid replicons. The isolates showed high genetic heterogeneity based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns.

Age-related Changes in the Percentage Content of Edible and Non-edible Components in Broiler Chickens

  • Murawska, Daria;Kleczek, Katarzyna;Wawro, Kazimierz;Michalik, Danuta
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.24 no.4
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    • pp.532-539
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    • 2011
  • The objective of this study was to determine age-related changes in the percentage content of edible and non-edible components in broiler chickens. The experimental materials comprised 240 Ross 308 chicks (sex ratio 1:1) raised to 10 weeks of age and fed standard diets ad libitum. Starting from the first week of rearing, every 7 days 10 males and 10 females were selected randomly for slaughter and post-slaughter analysis. The data obtained were verified statistically. The percentage content of edible components increased and the percentage content of non-edible parts decreased as the chicks grew older. In broilers aged 1 week and 10 weeks, edible components accounted for 47.0% and 66.4% total body weight, respectively. The share of muscle tissue increased considerably over this period, from 30.9% total body weight in week 1 to 52.4% in week 10. An increase in the percentage of skin and subcutaneous fat was observed for the first three weeks only, while the percentage content of giblets (in contrast to the remaining edible parts) decreased with age. For non-edible parts, the share of bones diminished by 2.5% and the proportion of slaughter offal reduced by 13.8%. A rising tendency was noted with respect to feathers and abdominal fat, while the content of the remaining offal decreased.

Cadmium Exposure and Potential Health Risk from Foods in Contaminated Area, Thailand

  • Chunhabundit, Rodjana
    • Toxicological Research
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    • v.32 no.1
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    • pp.65-72
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    • 2016
  • Man-made cadmium (Cd) emissions can be transported between environmental matrices and the food chain. Food is the primary source of Cd exposure among general population as a consequence of the bioconcentration of Cd from soil. Chronic Cd exposure has been reported to be associated with chronic kidney disease, osteoporosis, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) established the safe level of Cd intake as provisional tolerable monthly intake (PTMI) of $25{\mu}g/kg\;bw$ in 2010. The major food groups that contribute to the most Cd exposure are rice and grains, shellfish and sea food, meat including edible offal, and vegetables. A number of studies reported the high Cd contaminated levels in foods from polluted areas in Thailand. The results are of high concern since the contaminations occur in foods that are major Cd contributors. Thus, in this review, the current situations of Cd contaminated foods in polluted areas of Thailand are summarized. In addition, the Cd intakes from selected scenarios are estimated to assess the potential health risk to consumers and the suggestions are also included.

Nontyphoid Salmonella Prevalence, Serovar Distribution and Antimicrobial Resistance in Slaughter Sheep

  • Cetin, Ece;Temelli, Seran;Eyigor, Aysegul
    • Food Science of Animal Resources
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    • v.40 no.1
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    • pp.21-33
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    • 2020
  • This study aimed to determine the current prevalence, serovar distribution and antimicrobial resistance rate and patterns of nontyphoid Salmonella (NTS) in slaughter sheep and their edible offal. While filling the gap of up to date related information in Turkey, data presented is also of significance since contamination of ovine meat, its products and offal with this pathogen is threat to public health due to their considerably high consumption rates in our country. Current NTS carriage in 200 apparently healthy slaughter sheep by ISO 6579:2002, 6579:2002/A1:2007 standard bacteriology (ISO) was 5% (10/200) (4 fecal content - 2%, 3 mesenterial lymph node - 1.5%, 3 kidney - 1.5%) out of 1,400 samples (0.7%), with no isolation from carcass, liver, gallbladder, spleen. Real-time PCR was in substantial agreement to ISO in confirming Salmonella-suspect isolates (Relative Trueness: 93.6%). S. Newport (40%) was the predominant serovar, followed by the second prevalent serovars as S. Typhimurium and S. Kentucky (20%), and by S. Umbilo and S. Corvallis (10%). Four and 6 out of 10 NTS isolates were susceptible (40%) and resistant (60%) to 18 antimicrobials, respectively. S. Typhimurium isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR) to tigecycline and sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim, with one also resistant to cefepime. S. Corvallis was MDR to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and pefloxacin. The predominance of S. Newport and first isolation of S. Corvallis in sheep in the world; first time isolations of Newport, Kentucky, Corvallis, Umbilo serovars from sheep in Turkey; and high antimicrobial resistance rates obtained in majority of the isolates highlights study findings.