• Title, Summary, Keyword: downburst

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A proposed model of the pressure field in a downburst

  • Tang, Z.;Lu, L.Y.
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.17 no.2
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    • pp.123-133
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    • 2013
  • Pressure field and velocity profiles in a thunderstorm downburst are significantly different from that of an atmospheric boundary layer wind. A model of the pressure field in a downburst is presented in accordance with the experimental and numerical results. Large eddy simulation method is employed to investigate transient pressure field on impingement ground of a downburst. In addition, velocity profiles of the downburst are studied, and good agreement is achieved between the present results and the data obtained from empirical models.

Behavior of self supported transmission line towers under stationary downburst loading

  • Darwish, Mohamed M.;El Damatty, Ashraf A.
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.14 no.5
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    • pp.481-498
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    • 2011
  • During the past decade, many electrical transmission tower structures have failed during downburst events. This study is a part of a research program aimed to understand the behaviour of transmission lines under such localized wind events. The present study focuses on assessing the behaviour of self supported transmission line towers under downburst loading. A parametric study is performed to determine the critical downburst configurations causing maximum axial forces for various members of a tower. The sensitivity of the internal forces developing in the tower's members to changes in the downburst size and location was studied. The structural behaviour associated with the critical downburst configurations is described and compared to the behaviour under 'normal' wind loads.

Prediction of downburst-induced wind pressure coefficients on high-rise building surfaces using BP neural network

  • Fang, Zhiyuan;Wang, Zhisong;Li, Zhengliang
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.30 no.3
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    • pp.289-298
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    • 2020
  • Gusts generated by downburst have caused a great variety of structural damages in many regions around the world. It is of great significance to accurately evaluate the downburst-induced wind load on high-rise building for the wind resistance design. The main objective of this paper is to propose a computational modeling approach which can satisfactorily predict the mean and fluctuating wind pressure coefficients induced by downburst on high-rise building surfaces. In this study, using an impinging jet to simulate downburst-like wind, and simultaneous pressure measurements are obtained on a high-rise building model at different radial locations. The model test data are used as the database for developing back propagation neural network (BPNN) models. Comparisons between the BPNN prediction results and those from impinging jet test demonstrate that the BPNN-based method can satisfactorily and efficiently predict the downburst-induced wind pressure coefficients on single and overall surfaces of high-rise building at various radial locations.

Two case studies on structural analysis of transmission towers under downburst

  • Yang, FengLi;Zhang, HongJie
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.22 no.6
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    • pp.685-701
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    • 2016
  • Downbursts are of great harm to transmission lines and many towers can even be destroyed. The downburst wind field model by Chen and Letchford was applied, and the wind loads of two typical transmission towers in inland areas and littoral areas were calculated separately. Spatial finite element models of the transmission towers were established by elastic beam and link elements. The wind loads as well as the dead loads of conductors and insulators were simplified and applied on the suspension points by concentrated form. Structural analysis on two typical transmission towers under normal wind and downburst was completed. The bearing characteristics and the failure modes of the transmission towers under downburst were determined. The failure state of tower members can be judged by the calculated stress ratios. It shows that stress states of the tower members were mainly controlled by 45 degree wind load. For the inland areas with low deign wind velocity, though the structural height is not in the highest wind velocity zone of downburst, the wind load under downburst is much higher than that under normal wind. The main members above the transverse separator of the legs will be firstly destroyed. For the littoral areas with high deign wind velocity, the wind load under downburst is lower than under normal wind. Transmission towers are not controlled by the wind loads from downbursts in design process.

Dynamic characteristics of transmission line conductors and behaviour under turbulent downburst loading

  • Darwish, Mohamed M.;El Damatty, Ashraf A.;Hangan, Horia
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.13 no.4
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    • pp.327-346
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    • 2010
  • During the past decade, many electrical transmission tower structures have failed during downburst events. This study is a part of a research program aimed to understand the behaviour of transmission lines under such localized wind events. The present study focuses on the assessment of the dynamic behaviour of the line conductors under downburst loading. A non-linear numerical model, accounting for large deformations and the effect of pretension loading, is developed and used to predict the natural frequencies and mode shapes of conductors at various loading stages. A turbulence signal is extracted from a set of full-scale data. It is added to the mean component of the downburst wind field previously evaluated from a CFD analysis. Dynamic analysis is performed using various downburst configurations. The study reveals that the response is affected by the background component, while the resonant component turns to be negligible due large aerodynamic damping of the conductors.

Behaviour of guyed transmission line structures under downburst wind loading

  • Shehata, A.Y.;El Damatty, A.A.
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.10 no.3
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    • pp.249-268
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    • 2007
  • Past experience indicates that the majority of failures of electrical transmission tower structures occurred during high intensity wind events, such as downbursts. The wind load distribution associated with these localized events is different than the boundary layer wind profile that is typically used in the design of structures. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study represents the first comprehensive investigation that assesses the effect of varying the downburst parameters on the structural performance of a transmission line structure. The study focuses on a guyed tower structure and is conducted numerically using, as a case study, one of the towers that failed in Manitoba, Canada, during a downburst event in 1996. The study provides an insight about the spatial and time variation of the downburst wind field. It also assesses the variation of the tower members' internal forces with the downburst parameters. Finally, the structural behaviour of the tower under critical downburst configurations is described and is compared to that resulting from the boundary layer normal wind load conditions.

Downburst versus boundary layer induced wind loads for tall buildings

  • Kim, Jongdae;Hangan, Horia;Eric Ho, T.C.
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.10 no.5
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    • pp.481-494
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    • 2007
  • Downbursts are transient phenomena that produce wind profiles that are distinctly different from synoptic boundary layers. Wind field data from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of isolated downburst-like impinging jets, are used to investigate structural loads of tall buildings due to these high intensity winds. The base shear forces and base moments of tall buildings of heights between 120 and 250 m produced by downburst winds of various scales are compared with the forces from the equivalent boundary layer gust winds, with matched 10-metre wind velocity. The wind profiles are mainly functions of the size of the downburst and the radial distance from the centre of the storm. Wind forces due to various downburst profiles are investigated by placing the building at different locations relative to the storm center as well as varying the size of the downburst. Overall it is found that downbursts larger than approx. 2,000 m in diameter might produce governing design wind loads above those from corresponding boundary layer winds for tall buildings.

Aero-elastic response of transmission line system subjected to downburst wind: Validation of numerical model using experimental data

  • Elawady, Amal;Aboshosha, Haitham;El Damatty, Ashraf
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.27 no.2
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    • pp.71-88
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    • 2018
  • At the University of Western Ontario (UWO), numerical tools represented in semi-closed form solution for the conductors and finite element modeling of the lattice tower were developed and utilized significantly to assess the behavior of transmission lines under downburst wind fields. Although these tools were validated against other finite element analyses, it is essential to validate the findings of those tools using experimental data. This paper reports the first aeroelastic test for a multi-span transmission line under simulated downburst. The test has been conducted at the three-dimensional wind testing facility, the WindEEE dome, located at the UWO. The experiment considers various downburst locations with respect to the transmission line system. Responses obtained from the experiment are analyzed in the current study to identify the critical downburst locations causing maximum internal forces in the structure (i.e., potential failure modes), which are compared with the failure modes obtained from the numerical tools. In addition, a quantitative comparison between the measured critical responses obtained from the experiment with critical responses obtained from the numerical tools is also conducted. The study shows a very good agreement between the critical configurations of the downburst obtained from the experiment compared to those predicted previously by different numerical studies. In addition, the structural responses obtained from the experiment and those obtained from the numerical tools are in a good agreement where a maximum difference of 16% is found for the mean responses and 25% for the peak responses.

Wind pressure measurements on a cube subjected to pulsed impinging jet flow

  • Mason, M.S.;James, D.L.;Letchford, C.W.
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.12 no.1
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    • pp.77-88
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    • 2009
  • A pulsed impinging jet is used to simulate the gust front of a thunderstorm downburst. This work concentrates on investigating the peak transient loading conditions on a 30 mm cubic model submerged in the simulated downburst flow. The outflow induced pressures are recorded and compared to those from boundary layer and steady wall jet flow. Given that peak winds associated with downburst events are often located in the transient frontal region, the importance of using a non-stationary modelling technique for assessing peak downburst wind loads is highlighted with comparisons.

Impinging jet simulation of stationary downburst flow over topography

  • Mason, M.S.;Wood, G.S.;Fletcher, D.F.
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.10 no.5
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    • pp.437-462
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    • 2007
  • A non-translating, long duration thunderstorm downburst has been simulated experimentally and numerically by modelling a spatially stationary steady flow impinging air jet. Velocity profiles were shown to compare well with an upper-bound of velocity measurements reported for full-scale microbursts. Velocity speed-up over a range of topographic features in simulated downburst flow was also tested with comparisons made to previous work in a similar flow, and also boundary layer wind tunnel experiments. It was found that the amplification measured above the crest of topographic features in simulated downburst flow was up to 35% less than that observed in boundary layer flow for all shapes tested. From the computational standpoint we conclude that the Shear Stress Transport (SST) model performs the best from amongst a range of eddy-viscosity and second moment closures tested for modelling the impinging jet flow.