• Title, Summary, Keyword: coupled buildings

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Control of 3-D coupled responses of wind-excited tall buildings by a spatially placed TLCD system

  • Liang, Shuguo;Li, Qiusheng;Qu, Weilian
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.3 no.3
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    • pp.193-207
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    • 2000
  • The possible application of a spatially placed passive tuned liquid column damper system for suppressing coupled lateral-torsional responses of tall buildings is investigated in this paper. The wind loads acting on rectangular tall buildings are analytically expressed as 3-D stochastic model. Meanwhile, the 3-D responses of tall buildings may be coupled due to eccentricities between the stiffness and mass centers of the buildings. In these cases, torsional responses of the buildings are rather larger, and a TLCD system composed of several TLCD located near the sides of the buildings is more effective than the same TLCD placed at the building center in reducing both translational and torsional responses of the buildings. In this paper, extensive analytical and numerical work has been done to present the calculation method and optimize the parameters of such TLCD systems. The numerical examples show that the spatially placed TLCD system can reduce coupled along-wind, across-wind and torsional responses significantly with a fairly small mass ratio.

Performance based evaluation of RC coupled shear wall system with steel coupling beam

  • Bengar, Habib Akbarzadeh;Aski, Roja Mohammadalipour
    • Steel and Composite Structures
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    • v.20 no.2
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    • pp.337-355
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    • 2016
  • Steel coupling beam in reinforced concrete (RC) coupled shear wall system is a proper substitute for deep concrete coupling beam. Previous studies have shown that RC coupled walls with steel or concrete coupling beam designed with strength-based design approach, may not guarantee a ductile behavior of a coupled shear wall system. Therefore, seismic performance evaluation of RC coupled shear wall with steel or concrete coupling beam designed based on a strength-based design approach is essential. In this paper first, buildings with 7, 14 and 21 stories containing RC coupled shear wall system with concrete and steel coupling beams were designed with strength-based design approach, then performance level of these buildings were evaluated under two spectrum; Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) and Maximum Considered Earthquake (MCE). The performance level of LS and CP of all buildings were satisfied under DBE and MCE respectively. In spite of the steel coupling beam, concrete coupling beam in RC coupled shear wall acts like a fuse under strong ground motion.

Dynamic to static eccentricity ratio for site-specific earthquakes

  • Kamatchi, P.;Ramana, G.V.;Nagpal, A.K.;Iyer, Nagesh R.;Bhat, J.A.
    • Earthquakes and Structures
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    • v.9 no.2
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    • pp.391-413
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    • 2015
  • Damage of torsionally coupled buildings situated on soil sites has been reported in literature, however no site-specific studies are available for torsionally coupled buildings having site characteristics as a parameter. Effect of torsion is being accounted in seismic codes by the provision of design eccentricity where the dynamic to static eccentricity ratio is a parameter. In this paper, a methodology to determine dynamic to static eccentricity ratio of torsionally coupled buildings has been demonstrated for Delhi region for two torsionally coupled buildings on three soil sites. The variations of average and standard deviations of frame shears for stiff and flexible edges are studied for four eccentricity ratios for the two buildings for the three sites. From the limited studies made, it is observed that the dynamic to static eccentricity ratios observed for site-specific earthquakes are different from Indian seismic code specified value, hence a proposal is made to include a comment in Indian seismic code. Methodology proposed in this paper can be adopted for any region, for the estimation of dynamic to static eccentricity ratio for site specific earthquake.

Wind-induced lateral-torsional coupled responses of tall buildings

  • Wu, J.R.;Li, Q.S.;Tuan, Alex Y.
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.11 no.2
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    • pp.153-178
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    • 2008
  • Based on the empirical formulas for power spectra of generalized modal forces and local fluctuating wind forces in across-wind and torsional directions, the wind-induced lateral-torsional coupled response analysis of a representative rectangular tall building was conducted by setting various parameters such as eccentricities in centers of mass and/or rigidity and considering different torsional to lateral stiffness ratios. The eccentricity effects on the lateral-torsional coupled responses of the tall building were studied comprehensively by structural dynamic analysis. Extensive computational results indicated that the torsional responses at the geometric center of the building may be significantly affected by the eccentricities in the centers of mass and/or rigidity. Covariance responses were found to be in the same order of magnitude as the along-wind or across-wind responses in many eccentricity cases, suggesting that the lateral-torsional coupled effects on the overall wind-induced responses can not be neglected for such situations. The calculated results also demonstrated that the torsional motion contributed significantly to the total responses of rectangular tall buildings with mass and/or rigidity eccentricities. It was shown through this study that the framework presented in this paper provides a useful tool to evaluate the wind-induced lateral-torsional coupled responses of rectangular buildings, which will enable structural engineers in the preliminary design stages to assess the serviceability of tall buildings, potential structural vibration problems and the need for a detailed wind tunnel test.

Wind-induced coupled translational-torsional motion of tall buildings

  • Thepmongkorn, S.;Kwok, K.C.S.
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.1 no.1
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    • pp.43-57
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    • 1998
  • A three-degree-of-freedom base hinged assembly (BHA) for aeroelastic model tests of tall building was developed. The integral parts of a BHA, which consists of two perpendicular plane frames and a flexural pivot, enable this modeling technique to independently simulate building translational and torsional degree-of-freedom. A program of wind tunnel aeroelastic model tests of the CAARC standard tall building was conducted with emphasis on the effect of (a) torsional motion, (b) cross-wind/torsional frequency ratio and (c) the presence of an eccentricity between center of mass and center of stiffness on wind-induced response characteristics. The experimental results highlight the significant effect of coupled translational-torsional motion and the effect of eccentricity between center of mass and center of stiffness on the resultant rms acceleration responses in both along-wind and cross-wind directions especially at operating reduced wind velocities close to a critical value of 10. In addition, it was sound that the vortex shedding process remains the main excitation mechanism in cross-wind direction even in case of tall buildings with coupled translational-torsional motion and with eccentricity.

Wind-induced response of structurally coupled twin tall buildings

  • Lim, Juntack;Bienkiewicz, Bogusz
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.10 no.4
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    • pp.383-398
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    • 2007
  • The paper describes a study of the effects of structural coupling on the wind-induced response of twin tall buildings connected by a skybridge. Development of a dual high-frequency force balance used in wind tunnel investigation and background information on the methodology employed in analysis are presented. Comparisons of the wind-induced building response (rooftop acceleration) of structurally coupled and uncoupled twin buildings are provided and the influence of structural coupling is assessed. It is found that the adverse aerodynamic interference effects caused by close proximity of the buildings can be significantly reduced by the coupling. Neglecting of such interactions may lead to excessively conservative estimates of the wind-induced response of the buildings. The presented findings suggest that structural coupling should be included in wind-resistant design of twin tall buildings.

High-frequency force balance technique for tall buildings: a critical review and some new insights

  • Chen, Xinzhong;Kwon, Dae-Kun;Kareem, Ahsan
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.18 no.4
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    • pp.391-422
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    • 2014
  • The high frequency force balance (HFFB) technique provides convenient measurements of integrated forces on rigid building models in terms of base bending moments and torque and/or base shear forces. These base moments or forces are then used to approximately estimate the generalized forces of building fundamental modes with mode shape corrections. This paper presents an analysis framework for coupled dynamic response of tall buildings with HFFB technique. The empirical mode shape corrections for generalized forces with coupled mode shapes are validated using measurements of synchronous pressures on a square building surface from a wind tunnel. An alternative approach for estimating the mean and background response components directly using HFFB measurements without mode shape corrections is introduced with a discussion on higher mode contributions. The uncertainty in the mode shape corrections and its influence on predicted responses of buildings with both uncoupled and coupled modal shapes are examined. Furthermore, this paper presents a comparison of aerodynamic base moment spectra with available data sets for various tall building configurations. Finally, e-technology aspects in conjunction with HFFB technique such as web-based on-line analysis framework for buildings with uncoupled mode shapes used in NALD (NatHaz Aerodynamic Loads Database) is discussed, which facilitates the use of HFFB data for preliminary design stages of tall buildings subject to wind loads.

Pounding between adjacent buildings of varying height coupled through soil

  • Naserkhaki, Sadegh;El-Rich, Marwan;Aziz, Farah N.A. Abdul;Pourmohammad, Hassan
    • Structural Engineering and Mechanics
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    • v.52 no.3
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    • pp.573-593
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    • 2014
  • Pounding between adjacent buildings is a significant challenge in metropolitan areas because buildings of different heights collide during earthquake excitations due to varying dynamic properties and narrow separation gaps. The seismic responses of adjacent buildings of varying height, coupled through soil subjected to earthquake-induced pounding, are evaluated in this paper. The lumped mass model is used to simulate the buildings and soil, while the linear visco-elastic contact force model is used to simulate pounding forces. The results indicate while the taller building is almost unaffected when the shorter building is very short, it suffers more from pounding with increasing height of the shorter building. The shorter building suffers more from the pounding with decreasing height and when its height differs substantially from that of the taller building. The minimum required separation gap to prevent pounding is increased with increasing height of the shorter building until the buildings become almost in-phase. Considering the soil effect; pounding forces are reduced, displacements and story shears are increased after pounding, and also, minimum separation gap required to prevent pounding is increased.

Structural Shear Wall Systems with Metal Energy Dissipation Mechanism

  • Li, Guoqiang;Sun, Feifei;Pang, Mengde;Liu, Wenyang;Wang, Haijiang
    • International Journal of High-Rise Buildings
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    • v.5 no.3
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    • pp.195-203
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    • 2016
  • Shear wall structures have been widely used in high-rise buildings during the past decades, mainly due to their good overall performance, large lateral stiffness, and high load-carrying capacity. However, traditional reinforced concrete wall structures are prone to brittle failure under seismic actions. In order to improve the seismic behavior of traditional shear walls, this paper presents three different metal energy-dissipation shear wall systems, including coupled shear wall with energy-dissipating steel link beams, frame with buckling-restrained steel plate shear wall structure, and coupled shear wall with buckling-restrained steel plate shear wall. Constructional details, experimental studies, and calculation analyses are also introduced in this paper.

Characteristics of wind-Induced Coupled Motion of Tapered and Setback Tall Buildings (비정형 초고층 건물의 바람에 의한 편심응답 특성)

  • Kim, Yong-Chul;Kanda, Jun;Tamura, Yukio
    • Journal of the Korean Association for Spatial Structures
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    • v.13 no.1
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    • pp.79-86
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    • 2013
  • For most of recent tall buildings, one characteristic is that their building shapes vary with height such as taper and setback, and this implies that the distribution of their structural components may also vary with height. Because of these structural variations, although the sectional shapes of these buildings are symmetric, it is difficult to say whether or not they are structurally symmetric. The acceleration responses of structurally asymmetric tall buildings are larger than those of non-eccentric buildings, thus raising the possibility of problems during strong winds and typhoons. This paper describes wind tunnel tests carried out using building models with height variations and acceleration response analyses, and discusses the resulting response characteristics. For tapered and setback buildings, although the across-wind accelerations are larger than those of a square building, the total root-mean-square accelerations remain small because of smaller along-wind and torsional rms accelerations. And it was found that the effects of statistical couplings between along-wind force and other two forces are negligible.