• Title, Summary, Keyword: core needle biopsy

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New Radiofrequency Device to Reduce Bleeding after Core Needle Biopsy: Experimental Study in a Porcine Liver Model

  • Lim, Sanghyeok;Rhim, Hyunchul;Lee, Min Woo;Song, Kyoung Doo;Kang, Tae Wook;Kim, Young-sun;Lim, Hyo Keun
    • Korean Journal of Radiology
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    • v.18 no.1
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    • pp.173-179
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    • 2017
  • Objective: To evaluate the in vivo efficiency of the biopsy tract radiofrequency ablation for hemostasis after core biopsy of the liver in a porcine liver model, including situations with bleeding tendency and a larger (16-gauge) core needle. Materials and Methods: A preliminary study was performed using one pig to determine optimal ablation parameters. For the main experiment, four pigs were assigned to different groups according to heparinization use and biopsy needle caliber. In each pig, 14 control (without tract ablation) and 14 experimental (tract ablation) ultrasound-guided core biopsies were performed using either an 18- or 16-gauge needle. Post-biopsy bleeding amounts were measured by soaking up the blood for five minutes. The results were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: The optimal parameters for biopsy tract ablation were determined as a 2-cm active tip electrode set at 40-watt with a tip temperature of $70-80^{\circ}C$. The bleeding amounts in all experimental groups were smaller than those in the controls; however they were significant in the non-heparinized pig biopsied with an 18-gauge needle and in two heparinized pigs (p < 0.001). In the heparinized pigs, the mean blood loss in the experimental group was 3.5% and 13.5% of the controls biopsied with an 18- and 16-gauge needle, respectively. Conclusion: Radiofrequency ablation of hepatic core biopsy tract ablation may reduce post-biopsy bleeding even under bleeding tendency and using a larger core needle, according to the result from in vivo porcine model experiments.

The Usefulness of Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Bone Lesions (골 병변에서 세침흡인 세포검사의 유용성)

  • Kim, Bohng-Hee;Gong, Gyung-Yub
    • The Korean Journal of Cytopathology
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    • v.13 no.2
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    • pp.51-59
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    • 2002
  • To determine the usefulness on fine needle aspiration cytology(FNAC) of bone lesions and the complementary role of FNAC and percutaneous needle biopsy, 75 cases of FNAC taken from bone lesions were analyzed. Correlations with histopathology were possible in 47 cases, including 14 cases of simultaneous core biopsy and 33 cases of subsequent open biopsy due to inadequate aspirates. Among 75 cases, 4 cases were benign tumors and tumor-like lesion, 11 cases were malignant primary bone tumors, 17 cases were metastatic tumors, and 43 cases were nonneoplastic bone lesions. The aspirates were adequate in 35 cases(46.7%), in all of which the discrimination between benignancy and malignancy was possible. The main reason for Inadequate aspirates was due to hypocellularity. In the cases of aspiration and core biopsy simultaneously done, the diagnostic accuracy of aspiration, core biopsy, and both were 57%(8/14), 78.6%(11/14), and 92.9%(13/14), respectively. We conclude that a final diagnosis based on cytology is possible with the adequate aspirates and the clinical and radiological findings. Also we confirm the complementary role between FNAC and core biopsy in bone lesions.

Usefulness of X-ray Guided Biopsy and Ultrasound Guided Biopsy in Breast Microcalcification Biopsy (유방 미세석회화 조직검사에서 X선 유도 하 조직검사와 초음파 유도 하 조직검사의 유용성)

  • Choi, Miseon;Song, Jongnam
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Radiology
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    • v.10 no.3
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    • pp.201-206
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    • 2016
  • Social interest in breast cancer has increased. The most basic exams for diagnosis include breast X-ray and breast ultrasound. In particular, breast microcalcification requires histological diagnosis, and breast microcalcification biopsy is commonly performed. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze and assess X-ray guided biopsy (needle localized open biopsy) and ultrasound guided biopsy (sono guided core needle biopsy), which are basics in diagnosis of microcalcification. Targeting 241 cases in which magnification mammography was performed for patients who visited the hospital due to breast microcalcification, age distribution and the location of lesions were analyzed in X-ray guided biopsy and ultrasound guided biopsy. By classifying exams performed after magnification mammography, the frequencies of X-ray guided biopsy and ultrasound guided biopsy were analyzed, and malignant and benign results were confirmed. The results showed that 64 cases(26.6%) were X-ray guided biopsy, which was 5.4 times higher than 12 cases(4.9%) of ultrasound guided biopsy. Due to development of ultrasound equipments, stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsy, etc. the methods of histological diagnosis of microcalcification have become diverse, but when considering characteristics and limitations of each exam, X-ray guided biopsy is thought to be most accurate and useful.

The Role of Ultrasound Guided Core Needle Biopsy in Thyroid Nodule (갑상선 결절에서 초음파 유도하 중심생검의 역할)

  • Ryu, Yoon-Jong;Ahn, Soon-Hyun
    • Korean Journal of Head & Neck Oncology
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    • v.31 no.1
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    • pp.1-4
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    • 2015
  • Fine needle aspiration cytology(FNAC) holds a main role in assessing thyroid nodules. But nonnegligible rate of thyroid cytology is reported as uncertain, indeterminate or inadequate for diagnosis. Recently, the microhistologic evaluation by core needle biopsy(CNB) under ultrasound sonographical guidance has been reported to show high accuracy for the diagnose of thyroid nodules. Aim of this review was to furnish the state of the art of this topic by summarizing previous published data about indication, diagnostic performance, and complication of CNB in thyroid lesions compared with FNAC

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Practical Guidelines for Ultrasound-Guided Core Needle Biopsy of Soft-Tissue Lesions: Transformation from Beginner to Specialist

  • Kim, Sang Yoon;Chung, Hye Won;Oh, Tack Sun;Lee, Jong-Seok
    • Korean Journal of Radiology
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    • v.18 no.2
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    • pp.361-369
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    • 2017
  • Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (US-CNB) is an important step in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions. To maximize efficacy and minimize the complications of US-CNB, it is critical to collaborate with a multidisciplinary team and to understand the particular considerations of US-CNB for these lesions. The purpose of this article is to provide a systematic review and step-by-step tips for using US-CNB to diagnose musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions.

Performance Indices of Needle Biopsy Procedures for the Assessment of Screen Detected Abnormalities in Services Accredited by BreastScreen Australia

  • Farshid, Gelareh;Sullivan, Thomas;Jones, Simeon;Roder, David
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.24
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    • pp.10665-10673
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    • 2015
  • Background: We wished to analyse patterns of use of needle biopsy procedures by BreastScreen Australia (BSA) accredited programs to identify areas for improvement. Design: BSA services provided anonymous data regarding percutaneous needle biopsy of screen detected lesions assessed between 2005-2009. Results: 12 services, from 5 of 7 Australian states and territories provided data for 18212 lesions biopsied. Preoperative diagnosis rates were 96.84% for lesion other than microcalcification (LOTM) and 93.21% for microcalcifications. At surgery 97.9% impalpable lesions were removed at the first procedure. Of 11548 Microcalcification (LOTM) biopsied, 46.9% were malignant. The final diagnosis was reached by conventional core biopsy (CCB) in 72.46%, FNAB in 21.33%, VACB in 1.69% and open biopsy in 4.52% of lesions. FNA is being limited to LOTM with benign imaging After FNAB, core biopsy was required for 38% of LOTM. In LOTM the mean false positive rate (FPR) was 0.36% for FNAB, 0.06% for NCB and 0% for VACB. Diagnostic accuracy was 72.75% for FNAB and 92.1% for core biopsies combined. Of 6441 microcalcifications biopsied 2305 (35.8%) were malignant. Microcalcifications are being assessed primarily by NCB but 6.57% underwent FNAB, 45.6% of which required NCB. False positive diagnoses were rare. FNR was 5% for NCB and 1.53% for VACB. Diagnostic accuracy was 73.52% for FNAB, 86.29% for NCB and 88.63% for VACB. Only 8 of 12 services had access to VACB facilities. Conclusions: BSA services are selecting lesions effectively for biopsy and are achieving high preoperative diagnosis rates. Gaps in the present accreditation standards require further consideration.

Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Core Needle Biopsy of Abdominal Viscera: Tips to Ensure Safe and Effective Biopsy

  • Kim, Jin Woong;Shin, Sang Soo
    • Korean Journal of Radiology
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    • v.18 no.2
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    • pp.309-322
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    • 2017
  • Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy (USPCB) is used extensively in daily clinical practice for the pathologic confirmation of both focal and diffuse diseases of the abdominal viscera. As a guidance tool, US has a number of clear advantages over computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging: fewer false-negative biopsies, lack of ionizing radiation, portability, relatively short procedure time, real-time intra-procedural visualization of the biopsy needle, ability to guide the procedure in almost any anatomic plane, and relatively lower cost. Notably, USPCB is widely used to retrieve tissue specimens in cases of hepatic lesions. However, general radiologists, particularly beginners, find USPCB difficult to perform in abdominal organs other than the liver; indeed, a full understanding of the entire USPCB process and specific considerations for specific abdominal organs is necessary to safely obtain adequate specimens. In this review, we discuss some points and techniques that need to be borne in mind to increase the chances of successful USPCB. We believe that the tips and considerations presented in this review will help radiologists perform USPCB to successfully retrieve target tissue from different organs with minimal complications.

Comparison between Transthoracic Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology and Gun Biopsy of Pulmonary Mass (폐종괴에 대한 경피적 세침흡인세포검사와 자동총부착 침생검의 비교)

  • Nam, Eun-Sook;Kim, Duck-Hwan;Shin, Hyung-Sik
    • The Korean Journal of Cytopathology
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    • v.9 no.1
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    • pp.55-61
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    • 1998
  • To compare the diagnostic yields and complication rates of transthoracic fine needle aspiration cytology(FNAC) and gun biopsy in the diagnosis of pulmonary mass, a retrospective review was performed in 125 cases. Under the fluoroscopic guide, FNAC was performed by 20G Chiba needle in 91 cases, core biopsy was done by 18.5 G vaccum needle attached with automated biopsy gun in 74 cases and both procedures were done together in 37 cases. Overall sensitivity was 88.4% in FNAC and 87.5% in gun biopsy. For malignant pulmonary tumors, correct type correlation with final diagnosis was obtained in 33(76.7%) out of 43 cases by FNAC and 30(75.0%) out of 40 cases by gun biopsy. For benign pulmonary lesions, there were correct type correlation in 14(35.0%) out of 40 cases by FNAC and 14(53.8%) out of 26 cases by gun biopsy. The complication was pneumothorax and hemoptysis. Pneumothorax occured in 11.1% of FNAC, 10.9% of gun biopsy and 10.9% of both technique, among which chest tube drainages were necessary in one patient by gun biopsy and in three patients by both technique. Although no significant difference of diagnositc accuracy and complication rate was found between FNAC and gun biopsy, gun biopsy was more helpful in the diagnosis of pulmonary benign lesions than FNAC.

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Comparison of Pre-Operation Diagnosis of Thyroid Cancer with Fine Needle Aspiration and Core-needle Biopsy: a Meta-analysis

  • Li, Lei;Chen, Bao-Ding;Zhu, Hai-Feng;Wu, Shu;Wei, Da;Zhang, Jian-Quan;Yu, Li
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.17
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    • pp.7187-7193
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    • 2014
  • Background: The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare sensitivities and specificities of fine needle aspiration (FNA) and core needle biopsy (CNB) in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Materials and Methods: Articles were screened in Medline, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE and Google Scholar, and subsequently included and excluded based on the patient/problem-intervention-comparison-outcome (PICO) principle. Primary outcome was defined in terms of diagnostic values (sensitivity and specificity) of FNA and CNB for thyroid cancer. Secondary outcome was defined as the accuracy of diagnosis. Compiled FNA and CNB results from the final studies selected as appropriate for meta-analysis were compared with cases for which final pathology diagnoses were available. Statistical analyses were performed for FNA and CNB for all of the selected studies together, and for individual studies using the leave-one-out approach. Results: Article selection and screening yielded five studies for meta-analysis, two of which were prospective and the other three retrospective, for a total of 1,264 patients. Pooled diagnostic sensitivities of FNA and CNB methods were 0.68 and 0.83, respectively, with specificities of 0.93 and 0.94. The areas under the summary ROC curves were 0.905 (${\pm}0.030$) for FNA and 0.745 (${\pm}0.095$) for CNB, with no significant difference between the two. No one study had greater influence than any other on the pooled estimates for diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions: FNA and CNB do not differ significantly in sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of thyroid cancer.

Diagnostic Accuracy of Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology versus Concurrent Core Needle Biopsy in Evaluation of Intrathoracic Lesions: a Retrospective Comparative Study

  • Eftekhar-Javadi, Arezoo;Kumar, Perikala Vijayananda;Mirzaie, Ali Zare;Radfar, Amir;Filip, Irina;Niyazi, Maximilian;Sadeghipour, Alireza
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.16
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    • pp.7385-7390
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    • 2015
  • Background: Transthoracic fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology and core needle biopsy (CNB) are two commonly used approaches for the diagnosis of suspected neoplastic intrathoracic lesions. This study compared the diagnostic accuracy of FNA cytology and concurrent CNB in the evaluation of intrathoracic lesions. Materials and Methods: We studied FNA cytology and concurrent CNB specimens of 127 patients retrospectively, using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), immunohistochemistry, and, on certain occasions cytochemistry. Information regarding additional tissue tests was derived from the electronic archives of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine as well as patient records. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated for each test. Results: Of 127 cases, 22 were inconclusive and excluded from the study. The remaining 105 were categorized into 73 (69.5%) malignant lesions and 32 (30.5%) benign lesions. FNA and CNB findings were in complete agreement in 63 cases (60%). The accuracy and confidence intervals (CIs) of FNA and CNB for malignant tumors were 86.3% (CI: 79.3-90.7) and 93.2% (CI: 87.3-96.0) respectively. For epithelial malignant neoplasms, a definitive diagnosis was made in 44.8% of cases by FNA and 80.6% by CNB. The diagnostic accuracy of CNB for nonepithelial malignant neoplasms was 83.3% compared with 50% for FNA. Of the 32 benign cases, we made specific diagnoses in 16 with diagnostic accuracy of 81.3% and 6.3% for CNB and FNA, respectively. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that FNA is comparable to CNB in the diagnosis of malignant epithelial lesions whereas diagnostic accuracy of CNB for nonepithlial malignant neoplasms is superior to that for FNA. Further, for histological typing of tumors and examining tumor origin, immunohistochemical work up plays an important role.