• Title, Summary, Keyword: common names

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Suggestions for Translating Cetacean English Common Names with No Korean Common Names (한국어 일반명이 없는 고래 종의 영어 일반명에 대한 번역명 제안)

  • Sohn, Hawsun;Choi, Youngmin;Lee, Dasom
    • Korean Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
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    • v.49 no.6
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    • pp.875-882
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    • 2016
  • The numbers of books, news articles, and documentary films on whales and dolphins have increased dramatically in Korea. The translation of 37 species with established Korean names, as reviewed and reported by Sohn et al. (2012), Kim et al. (2010), and Kim et al. (2013) in those books and public media, was not a problem. However, 52 cetacean species, which do not have proper Korean names, have been translated into Korean, causing confusion in the public. This short note suggests Korean translations for common names that have no Korean names based on the origins of the English common names, recent scientific information, and books on cetaceans.

Unrecorded Species of Cordyceps used Oriental Medcine Resources

  • Cho, Duck-Hyun;Lee, Jong-Il
    • Plant Resources
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    • v.7 no.2
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    • pp.159-162
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    • 2004
  • Many higher fungi were collected at Mt.Sunun, Mt.Kangchon and Mt.Moak from June, 1991 to April, 2003. They were identified and surveyed with references. According to the result, Cordyceps clavata, C. cocciniocapite, C. ryougamimontanna, C. tuberculate J. moelleri and C. yakushimensis are unrecorded species to Korea. They were designed Korean common names by authors. Common names: Cordyceps clavata, C. cocciniocapite, C. ryougamimontanna, C. tuberculate f moelleri, C. yakushimensis, unrecorded species, common names.

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A Study on Disaster Recognition and Feasibility of Disaster Prevention Based on Place Names (지명을 통해 본 재해인식 및 방재 가능성 탐색)

  • Kim, Sun-Hee;Park, Kyeong
    • Journal of the Korean association of regional geographers
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    • v.16 no.5
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    • pp.457-473
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    • 2010
  • Patterns and regional distribution of disaster-related place names have been analyzed to confirm the recognition and probability of disaster and to explore the possibility of disaster prevention measures. 106 terms and 37,901 place names related to disaster and prevention measures have been collected from the Korean gazetteers "Hanguk Jimyeong Chongnam". Based on this, some conclusions have been drawn: firstly, place names related to the geomorphic processes and prevention measures are more common than any other disasters; secondly, place names related to heavy rain, flooding and drowning are most common. Analysis of the regional distribution pattern shows that disaster-related place names are most common in Jeolla and Gyeongsang Provinces and general place names reflecting environmental concern such as water, sand, plain, rain and dam are distributed evenly throughout the whole country; howe, r, place names such as dumbeong, gureong, yeoul, tan(灘), bangjuk, je(堤), and ji(池) are restricted to the specific region, which shows that place names reflects the locational and toprn sucic ainuations. Case st, anindicates that prevention measures should be focused on tributaries and srill villeys conaid ring that disasters originated from the combination of weather and landform conditions are most common throughout the whole country.

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The Influence of 'Hyang-yak-myeong', Korean Idu Herbal Common Names, upon Japanese Herbals (우리의 이두향약명(吏讀鄕藥名)이 일본의 본초학에 미친 영향)

  • Hong, Moon-Wha
    • Korean Journal of Pharmacognosy
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    • v.3 no.1
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    • pp.1-10
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    • 1972
  • Syllabary called Idu that used the Chinese characters to transcribe the sounds of Korean was superseded by the Korean alphabet in the 15th century. In the middle of Koryo Dynasty, 'Hyang-yak-myeong'(鄕藥名), the Idu common names of herbs began to appear in herbal books of Korea as the synonyms of the Chinese names. Those Idu names were also introduced by the Japanese herbals such as 'Honzo-komoku-keimo' (本草綱目 啓蒙) and it is interesting to point out that some of them were mistakenly cited in the books for lack of the knowledge of Korean language.

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Note on the New Korean Common Names of Marasmioid Fungi -1. The Genus Marasmius (한국산 낙엽버섯류의 새로운 한국어 일반명 -1. 낙엽버섯속)

  • Ryoo, Rhim;Antonin, Vladimir;Ka, Kang-Hyeon;Shin, Hyeon-Dong
    • The Korean Journal of Mycology
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    • v.41 no.4
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    • pp.280-286
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    • 2013
  • 47 species was reported in the genus Marasmius in Republic of Korea up to now. 26 of total 47 species previously recorded from Korea were made up a list. Korean common names of 10 new species and 11 species newly recorded in Korea were introduced in study with synoptic key. These names were followed by the Romanization rule to express Korean common name.

List of Korean Names for the Vascular Plants in Spitsbergen Island, in the Arctic Region (북극권 스피츠베르겐 섬의 관속식물 국명 목록)

  • Lee, Kyoo;Han, Dong-Uk;Hyun, Jin-Oh;Hwang, Young-Sim;Lee, Yoo-Kyung;Lee, Eun-Ju
    • Ocean and Polar Research
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    • v.34 no.1
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    • pp.101-110
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    • 2012
  • In this study, we attempted to provide Korean names to the arctic vascular plants observed around the Dasan Korean Arctic Station and Longyearbyen in Spitsbergen Island, in the Arctic region. To obtain recognizable results, plants were named according to the following naming rules. (1) When Korean names already existed, those names were used. (2) When there was no Korean name for a plant species, a scientific name for the plant was translated into a Korean name. (3) If the meaning of the scientific name was unclear, an English common name was translated into Korean name. (4) If the scientific names had meaning to the Arctic inhabitation, the Korean names included the word 'Buk-geuk'. (5) If the distribution of the plant was limited to the Arctic area or the original species lived in the polar region, the Korean name included the word 'Buk-geuk'. (6) If the plant had no Korean generic name, a particular suffix '~a-jae-bi' was added to the closely related genus name of the plant species, or a new Korean genus name was used by translating a common English name. (7) If the same generic name had two or more Korean names, a generic name that better reflected the characteristics of the plant was selected. In this paper, we reported Korean names for 46 plants species belonging to 15 families and 28 genera. Eight plants had an existing Korean name and the other species were given new Korean names based on the criteria outlined above. We also made new Korean generic names for three genera, Braya, Micranthes and Cassiope.

Nomenclature of Pyroxenes

  • Morimoto, N.;Fabries, J.;Ferguson, A.K.;Ginzburg, I.V.;Ross, M.;Seifert, F.A.;Zussman, J.;Aoki, A.;Gottardi, G.
    • Journal of the Mineralogical Society of Korea
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    • v.1 no.2
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    • pp.131-145
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    • 1988
  • This is the final report on the nomenclature of pyroxenes by the Subcommittee on Pyroxenes established by the Commission on New Minerals and Mineral Names of the International Mineralogical Association. The recommendations of the Subcommittee as put forward in this report have been formally accepted by the Commission. Accepted and widely used names have been chemically defined, by combining new and conventional methods, to agree as far as possible with the consensus of present use. Twenty names are formally accepted, among which thirteen are used to represent the end members of definite chemical compositions. In common binary solid-solution series, species names are given to the two end members by the "50% rule." Adjectival modifiers for pyroxene mineral names are defined to indicate unusual amounts of chemical constituents. This report includes a list of 105 previously used pyroxene names that have been formally discarded by the Commission.

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Etymological Explanation of the Scientific Names for Trees and the Foreign Names of Them(II) (수목학명(樹木學名)의 어원구명(語源究明) 및 외국명(外國名) 조사(調査)(제(第)2보(報)))

  • Kim, Jyeung Gook
    • Journal of Korean Society of Forest Science
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    • v.31 no.1
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    • pp.53-61
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    • 1976
  • Though it is not easy for those who study dendrology to memorize all the scientific names of trees, the names remaines in their memory can facilitate the understanding of foreign technical books. The scientific name of a tree indicates characteristics of shape, color, and other aspects of the tree and by analyzing the name we can see common element found in other scientific names of trees. It is helpful to those who want to memorize and study the scientific names of trees if they understand their etymology. The preseut study is the seconds report of the investigation which aims at examining the etymology of the scientific names of native and foreign trees growing in Korea and their original names not only at the habitat but in Japan, China, England, Germany, and France. While the first report, which was made known in Theses Vol. 9. (The City College of Seoul 1975), is the examination of the scientific names of trees belonging to Gymnospermae, the present report is that of scientific names of trees belonging to Piperales: 2 families, 2 genera and 2 species; and trees belonging to Salicales: 1 family, 3 genera, 44 species, 16 varieties, and 3 forms. As the etymology of the scientific names of trees is made clear, this study will help those who want memorize the scientific names and study foreign technical books and it is also useful for international interchange of trees. The classification is depended chiefly on Dendrology by Prof. Lee Tchang-bok and "Plant Resources of Korea" shown in Biblography No. 10; the native names of trees on Jumoku Daizusetsu by Dr. Uehara; and etymology on A source-Book of Biological Names and Terms by E.C. Jager. In the column of etymology of the scientific names for genera, species, varieties and forms, Gr. stands for Greek, L. for Latin, NL. for New Latin, and genit. for genitive.

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Review of the Korean Vernacular Names of Cetaceans (한반도 근해 고래류의 한국어 일반명에 대한 고찰)

  • Sohn, Hawsun;An, Du Hae;Kim, Doo Nam
    • Korean Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
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    • v.45 no.5
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    • pp.513-522
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    • 2012
  • This paper reviews the Korean vernacular names of 35 cetacean species found in Korean waters and mentioned in 19 references, including laws, high school textbooks, and books on whales. The vernacular names of 16 species were identical in all sources examined. Some names have their origins in old Korean books, while others have recently entered public awareness through movies, TV programs, and the mass media; some species are frequently studied by researchers. Given the nature of vernacular names, that is, names used by people who live in sympatry with the animals, priority was not given high consideration in this paper. Instead, we carefully investigated the origin, publicity, and rationale of the Korean common names for the 35 species. All of these Korean names are also listed in "The World Cetacea Database (http://www.marinespecies.org/cetacea/)," which contains the most accurate cetacean systematic information on the Web.