• Title, Summary, Keyword: chemotherapy

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Survey on the Side Effects of the Vesicant Chemotherapy (정맥으로 투여하는 발포성 항암제의 합병증)

  • Choi Eun-Sook;Kim Keum-Soon;Joo Myung-Soon;Kim Bok-Ja
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing
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    • v.7 no.3
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    • pp.415-428
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    • 2000
  • The purpose of this study was to identify side effects of the vesicant chemotherapy. The study was designed to be a descriptive survey. The subjects of this study were 88 patients with various types of cancer, primary lung cancer(25.0%), advanced gastric cancer(25.0%), breast cancer(20.5%), etc. The mean age was 44.8 years old(range: 16-68). The questionnaire was completed by nurses of the outpatient unit and chemotherapy ward, and intravenous nurse specialist. The results of the study were as follows: 1) Chemotherapy was administered with a 23G scalp needle and 24G insyte. Injection site was dorsum of hands(64.7%), cephalic vein(19.3%). Successful rate for the first attempt was 88.6%. The first & second cycle chemotherapy was 29.5% each.. Mainly used drugs were Navelbine(34.1%), Adriamycin(20.5%). 2) Venous Problems after chemotherapy were pain(13.6%) incurred by venous, mainly due to the administration of Navelbine; redness at the inravenous site(12.5%) and itching sense 2.3% Non-venous problems were nausea (18.2%), dullness(14.8%), vomiting(8.0%), facial flushing(6.8%), anxiety(5.7%). Subjective discomforts after chemotherapy were generalized arm pain at the injection side(14.8%), dizziness(6.8%), weakness(5.7%) and general bodyache(5.7%). Systemic anaphylactic reaction and extravasation did not occur. 3) Non-venous problem after chemotherapy were nausea, vomiting & anorexia. Frequency of chemotherapy related to side effects were itching, facial flushing, and nausea(p< .05). Day of chemotherapy related to side effects were nausea & vomiting(p< .05). Site of chemotherapy related to side effects were redness(p< .05). Frequency of venipuncture related to side effects were redness(p< .05). Conclusively, cancer chemotherapy patients have had some venous problem. They need appropriate venous access devices for chemotherapy. And other non-venous problem will be managed appropriately. Further research was required to identify the rate of venous complication or side effects of vesicant chemotherapy.

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Clinical Study on Safety and Efficacy of Qinin® (Cantharidin Sodium) Injection Combined with Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Gastric Cancer

  • Zhan, Yi-Ping;Huang, Xin-En;Cao, Jie;Lu, Yan-Yan;Wu, Xue-Yan;Liu, Jin;Xu, Xia;Xu, Lin;Xiang, Jin;Ye, Li-Hong
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.9
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    • pp.4773-4776
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    • 2012
  • Objectives: To assess the efficacy, side effects, and the impact on quality of life with $Qinin^{(R)}$ (Cantharidin sodium) injection combined with chemotherapy for gastric cancer patients. Method: A consecutive cohort of 70 patients were divided into two groups: experimental group with cantharidin sodium injection combined with chemotherapy, while the control group received chemotherapy alone. After more than two courses of treatment, efficacy, quality of life and side effects were evaluated. Results: The response rate of experimental group was not significantly different from that of the control group (P>0.05), but differences were significant in clinical benefit response and KPS score. In addition, gastrointestinal reactions and the incidence of leukopenia were lower than in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions: $Qinin^{(R)}$ (Cantharidin sodium) injection combined with chemotherapy enhances clinical benefit response, improving quality of life of gastric cancer patients and reducing side effects of chemotherapy. Thus $Qinin^{(R)}$ (Cantharidin sodium) injection deserves to be further investigated in randomized control clinical trails.

Safety of Brucea javanica and Cantharidin Combined with Chemotherapy for Treatment of NSCLC Patients

  • Ji, Zhu-Qing;Huang, Xin-En;Wu, Xue-Yan;Liu, Jin;Wang, Lin;Tang, Jin-Hai
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.20
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    • pp.8603-8605
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    • 2014
  • Objective: To assess the safety of Brucea javanica and Cantharidin combined with chemotherapy in treating patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Method: A consecutive cohort of patients with NSCLC were divided into four groups: experimental group A treated with Brucea javanica injection combined with chemotherapy; experimental group B with Cantharidin injection combined with chemotherapy; experimental group C treated with Brucea javanica and Cantharidin injection combined with chemotherapy; and the control group receiving only chemotherapy. After more than two courses of treatment, safety, quality of life and side effects were evaluated. Results: The incidences of myelosuppression in groups A, B and C were lower than that in Control group (p<0.05), but without significant differences among A, B and C. Adverse effects on the gastrointestinal tract also were lower than in controls (p<0.05) without variation amnog the combined treatment groups. Conclusions: Brucea javanica or Cantharidin combined with chemotherapy could in both cases improve quality of life in our cohort of NSCLC patients without any increase in toxicity. However, further clinical experiments should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Brucea javanica and Cantharidin combined with chemotherapy for patients with NSCLC.

Role of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in the Management of Advanced Ovarian Cancer

  • Zhao, Dan;Wu, Ling-Ying;Wang, Xiao-Bing;Li, Xiao-Guang
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.6
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    • pp.2369-2373
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    • 2015
  • Objective: To analyze efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer. Materials and Methods: A total of 107 patients with advanced ovarian cancer undergoing cytoreductive surgery were divided into a neoadjuvant chemotherapy group (n=61) and a primary debulking group (n=46) and retrospectively analyzed. Platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy was applied to both groups after cytoreductive surgery ande overall and progression-free survival times were calculated. Results: No significant difference was observed in duration of hospitalization ($20.8{\pm}6.1$ vs. $20.2{\pm}5.4$ days, p>0.05). The operation time of neoadjuvant chemotherapy group was shorter than the initial surgery group ($3.1{\pm}0.7$ vs. $3.4{\pm}0.8$ h, p<0.05). There were no significant differences in median overall survival time between neoadjuvant chemotherapy group and surgery group (42 vs. 55 months, p>0.05). Similarly, there was no difference in median progression-free survival between neoadjuvant chemotherapy group and surgery group (16 vs. 17 months, p>0.05). The surgical residual tumor size demonstrated no significant difference between initial surgery and neoadjuvant chemotherapy groups (p>0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that more than 3 cycles of regimen with neoadjuvant chemotherapy was associated with more resistance to chemotherapy compared with patients without receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (OR: 5.962, 95%CI: 1.184-30.030, p<0.05). Conclusions:Neoadjuvant chemotherapy can shorten the operation time. However, it does not improve survival rates of advanced ovarian cancer patients.

Treatment results of the second-line chemotherapy regimen for patients with low-risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia treated with 5-day methotrexate and 5-day etoposide

  • Kanno, Toshiyuki;Matsui, Hideo;Akizawa, Yoshika;Usui, Hirokazu;Shozu, Makio
    • Journal of Gynecologic Oncology
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    • v.29 no.6
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    • pp.89.1-89.8
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    • 2018
  • Objective: Highly effective chemotherapy for patients with low-risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is associated with almost a 100% cure rate. However, 20%-30% of patients treated with chemotherapy need to change their regimens due to severe adverse events (SAEs) or drug resistance. We examined the treatment outcomes of second-line chemotherapy for patients with low-risk GTN. Methods: Between 1980 and 2015, 281 patients with low-risk GTN were treated. Of these 281 patients, 178 patients were primarily treated with 5-day intramuscular methotrexate (MTX; n=114) or 5-day drip infusion etoposide (ETP; n=64). We examined the remission rates, the drug change rates, and the outcomes of second-line chemotherapy. Results: The primary remission rates and drug resistant rates of 5-day ETP were significantly higher (p<0.001) and significantly lower (p=0.002) than those of 5-day MTX, respectively. Forty-seven patients (26.4%) required a change in their chemotherapy regimen due to the SAEs (n=16) and drug resistance (n=31), respectively. Of these 47 patients failed the first-line regimen, 39 patients (39/47, 82.9%) were re-treated with single-agent chemotherapy, and 35 patients (35/39, 89.7%) achieved remission. Four patients failed second-line, single-agent chemotherapy and eight patients (17.0%) who failed first-line regimens were treated with combined or multi-agent chemotherapy and achieved remission. Conclusions: Patients with low-risk GTN were usually treated with single-agent chemotherapy, while 20%-30% patients had to change their chemotherapy regimen due to SAEs or drug resistance. The second-line regimens of single-agent chemotherapy were effective; however, there were several patients who needed multiple agents and combined chemotherapy to achieve remission.

The Relationship of Anorexia, Nausea, Vomiting, Oral Intake and Nutritional Status in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy (항암화학요법 환자의 식욕부진, 오심구토, 음식섭취량 및 영양상태와의 관계)

  • 양영희;이동선
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing
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    • v.30 no.3
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    • pp.720-730
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    • 2000
  • Malnutrition is a common problem in cancer patients. In addition anticancer drugs used in chemotherapy as a major therapeutic mode are famous as the side effect like nausea, vomiting, which lead the patients to malnourished state. This study was to determine the relationship of anorexia, nausea, vomiting and oral intake and identify the influence these side effects on the nutritional status in patients receiving chemotherapy. To assess the nutritional status, anthropometry such as weight, height, body mass index(BMI), body fat proportion, and triceps skinfold thickness, and biochemistry test such as hemoglobin and lymphocyte were measured at the pre- and post- chemotherapy and the readmission time, all three times. During chemotherapy, anorexia, nausea, and vomiting using a VAS or 5-point scale and 24 hour oral intake using a food record were measured daily. Forty-nine patients knowing their diagnosis and receiving chemotherapy were recruited from an oncological ward in a general hospital for 5 months and they were reduced 31 at readmission time for a next chemotherapy. The results were as follows. Most subjects (93.6%) were in the 4th stage of cancer and 57.1% of subjects were in the first or the second chemotherapy. In most subjects(82.6%), their weight was decreased 10.7% than as usual. The degree of anorexia, nausea, and vomiting was significantly higher and the amount of oral intake was significantly less during the chemotherapy than at the pre-chemotherapy. Weight, BMI, triceps skinfold were reduced more at the post- chemotherapy than the pre-chemotherapy and were recovered the nearly same but less level at the readmission time. Body fat proportion was increased at the post chemotherapy and then decreased at the readmission phase. Hemoglobin and the number of lymphocyte were below normal at the pre-chemotherapy and more reduced at the readmission time. Anorexia, nausea, and vomiting were related positively and oral intake was negatively related with nausea and vomiting. The nutritional status at the post- chemotherapy and the readmission time was explained 20% over by the side effect like anorexia, nausea, vomiting and oral intake during the chemotherapy. The significant nutrition predictors at the post- chemotherapy were vomiting and the significant predictors at the readmission time were anorexia, vomiting, and oral intake. These results indicated the patients receiving chemotherapy were continued to deteriorate the nutritional status. Therefore nurse should have knowledge how much the nutritional status can be affected and assess the nutritional status periodically and try to find out the intervention for side effects from the series of chemotherapies.

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Safety of Lienal Polypeptide Injection Combined with Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Advanced Cancer

  • Huang, Xin-En;Wang, Lin;Ji, Zhu-Qing;Liu, Meng-Yan;Qian, Ting;Li, Li
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.17
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    • pp.7837-7841
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    • 2015
  • Objective: To assess the safety of Liena polypeptide injection (produced by JILIN FSENS PHARMACEUTICAL CO.,LTD) combined with chemotherapy in treating patients with advanced cancers. Method: A consecutive cohort of patients with advanced cancers were treated with Liena polypeptide injection combined with chemotherapy. And chemotherapy for patients with advanced cancers were adopted from regimens suggested by NCCN guideline. Liena polypeptide injection was intravenously injected at a dosage of 2ml plus 100ml normal saline for continuous 7 days during chemotherapy as one course. After at least two courses of treatment, safety and side effects were evaluated. Results: There were 20 female and 14 male patients with advanced cancer recruited into this study, including 10 patients with breast, 8 patients with colorectal, 8 patients with lung, 4 patients with gastric, and 1 patient with esophageal cancer, as well as 1 patient with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 1 patient with low pharyngeal and 1 patient with urethral cancer. The median age of patients was 59 (40-82) years. Incidences of Grade 1 to 2 myelosuppression was observed in 5/34 patients, and Grade 1 to 2 elevation of hepatic enzyme was recorded in 3/34 patients. Adverse effects on the gastrointestinal tract were documented in 5/34 patients, and were Grade 1. No Grade 3-4 toxicities were diagnosed. No treatment related death was found. Conclusions: Liena polypeptide injection combined with chemotherapy was safe in treating several sites of tumors, that mainly included lung, colorectal and breast cancer. However, further study should be conducted to clarify the effectiveness of this treatment.

Impact of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Elderly Breast Patients in Taiwan, A Hospital-Based Study

  • Lee, Hsiu Chuan;Chen, Wei Yu;Huang, Wen Tsung;Cheng, Kuo Chen;Tian, Yu Feng;Ho, Chung Han;Tsao, Chao Jung;Feng, Yin Hsun
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.10
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    • pp.4591-4597
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    • 2016
  • Purpose: Decisions as to whether to provide adjuvant treatment in older breast cancer patients remains challenging. Side effects of chemotherapy have to be weighed against life expectancy, comorbidities, functional status, and frailty. To aid decision-making, we retrospectively analyzed 110 women with breast cancer treated with a curative intention from 2006 to 2012. Survival data with clinical and pathological parameters were evaluated to address the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in this study population. Method: A total of 110 elderly (>70 years) patients that received mastectomy at two hospitals in Taiwan were observed retrospectively for a medium of 51 months. After mastectomy, patients received conservative treatment or adjuvant chemotherapy, or hormone therapy following clinical guidelines or physician's preference. Data were collected from the cancer registry system. Results: Median age at diagnosis was 75.7 years. Thirty-five percent of patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, these having a significantly younger age ($mean=74.0{\pm}5.3$ vs $77.5{\pm}5.3$, p<0.001) and higher tumor staging (p=0.003) compared with their non-chemotherapy counterparts.Five-year overall survival was non-significantly higher in patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy (with chemotherapy 64.2% vs without chemotherapy 62.6%, p=0.635), while five-year recurrence free survival was non-significantly lower (with chemotherapy 64.1% vs without chemotherapy 90.5%, p=0.80). Conclusions: In this analysis, adjuvant chemotherapy tended to be given to patients with a younger age and higher tumor staging at our institute. It was not associated with any statistically significant improvement in survival and recurrence rate. Until age specific recommendations are available, physicians must use their clinical judgment and assess the tumor biology with the patient's comorbidities to make the best choice. Clinical trials focusing on this critical issue are warranted.

Transition of Symptoms and Quality of Life in Cancer Patients on Chemotherapy (항암화학요법 시행 초기 암환자의 증상 및 삶의 질 변화 양상)

  • Kim, Min-Young
    • Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing
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    • v.39 no.3
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    • pp.433-445
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    • 2009
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess changes in pain, fatigue, anorexia, anxiety and quality of life(QOL) in patients with cancer who were on chemotherapy. Methods: Symptoms and QOL were examined both before chemotherapy and after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. The participants were 76 cancer patients receiving chemotherapy in one of 7 hospitals. Results: The patients experienced a mean of 2.22-2.23 symptoms out of 4 symptoms. Patients who were female, or suffered from breast or colorectal cancer experienced more symptoms. Fatigue at present, and most severe fatigue and anorexia in the previous 3 weeks increased significantly. Anxiety and QOL decreased significantly after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Number of symptoms, anorexia at present, most severe anorexia in past 3 weeks, and anxiety had negative correlations. QOL before chemotherapy showed a positive correlation with QOL after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. In a regression analysis, anxiety, QOL at baseline, income, and the most severe pain in the past 3 weeks were significant predictors of QOL. Conclusion: Physical and psychological factors were significant predictors of both QOL and each subscale, and these factors correlated with each other. These results demonstrate the needs for early assessment and intervention from the start of chemotherapy to decrease symptoms and improve QOL.

Clinical Study on Safety and Efficacy of JiSaiXin (Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Injection Manufactured in China) for Chinese Undergoing Chemotherapy

  • Wang, Lin;Huang, Xin-En
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.1
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    • pp.299-301
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    • 2015
  • Objectives: To assess safety and efficacy of JiSaiXin (Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Injection manufactured in China, G-CSF) 150ug per day for three days and whether this regimen could reduce the incidence of febrile neutropenia caused by chemotherapy. Method: From July 2014 to December 2014 patients treated by chemotherapy in our hospital were randomly divided into two groups: Group A with prophylactic use of G-CSF (JiSaiXin) 24 hours after chemotherapy for consecutive 3 days; and Group B with G-CSF (JiSaiXin) after neutropenia. Routine blood tests were performed 7 days and 14 days after chemotherapy. Results: A total of 100 patients fulfilled study criteria, and the incidence of severe neutropenia (grade III/IV) and the incidence of febrile neutropenia in Group A were lower than those in Group B. Nine patients were found severe neutropenia (grade III/IV) in Group B, but one in Group A, three febrile neutropenia in Group B, but 0 in Group A. Conclusions: This study suggested that prophylactic use of G-CSF (JiSaiXin) 150ug per day 24 hours after chemotherapy for consecutive 3 days is safe and could be effective for preventing febrile neutropenia in patients with chemotherapy.