• Title, Summary, Keyword: cancer survivors

Search Result 266, Processing Time 0.04 seconds

Sexual Function of Breast Cancer Survivors and Healthy Women : A Comparative Study (유방암 생존자와 정상여성의 성기능)

  • Kim, Hye-Young;So, Hyang-Sook;Chae, Myeong-Jeong
    • Asian Oncology Nursing
    • /
    • v.9 no.1
    • /
    • pp.60-66
    • /
    • 2009
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyse the level of sexual function among breast cancer survivors as compared with that among healthy women. Method: A total of 208 women participated in this study: 103 breast cancer survivors attending self-help group and 105 community-residing healthy women in G city. A self-reported questionnaire with the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was used to obtain data. Data were analyzed using the SPSS Win 14.0 $K^+$ for descriptive statistics, t-test, and two-way ANOVA. Results: The sexual function score of breast cancer survivors was significantly lower than that of healthy women, respectively $14.9{\pm}9.9$ and $20.6{\pm}11.1$ (p<0.001). The sexual function of recurrent breast cancer survivors was significantly lower than that of women without recurrence. However, there were no significant differences in the sexual function score according to the cancer stage, period since diagnosis, and types of cancer treatment modality. Conclusion: The findings indicate the importance of sex-related counseling and educational programs to improve the quality of life of breast cancer survivors.

  • PDF

Dietary Intake Status among Korean Female Breast Cancer Survivors (한국 여성 유방암 경험자의 식사섭취실태)

  • Park, Myungsook;Hwang, Eunkyung;Moon, Hyeong-Gon;Noh, Dong-Young;Lee, Jung Eun
    • Korean Journal of Community Nutrition
    • /
    • v.19 no.2
    • /
    • pp.163-175
    • /
    • 2014
  • Objectives: We aimed to evaluate dietary intake among female breast cancer survivors in a cross-sectional study. Methods: A total of 127 women who had breast cancer surgery at least 6 months before baseline were included. Dietary intake of female breast cancer survivors was assessed through self-reported 3 day-dietary records. To compare dietary intake between breast cancer survivors and general female population without cancer, we selected the 1:4 age matched women from the 2011 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). In the KNHANES, participants were asked about their dietary intake using the 24-hour dietary recalls. We also examined whether dietary intake varied by age group, cancer stage, or time since surgery among breast cancer survivors. We used the generalized linear model to compare their dietary intakes. Results: Intakes of total energy, beta-carotene, folate, vitamin C, plant iron and fruits were lower among breast cancer survivors with longer time since surgery compared to those with shorter time (p<0.05). Breast cancer patients with higher stage at diagnosis tended to consume less legumes (p=0.01) than those with lower stage. When we compared dietary intake between breast cancer survivors and the general female population without cancer, breast cancer survivors were more likely to consume most of macro- and micro-nutrients in larger quantity (p<0.05) and adhere to healthier diet characterized by higher intakes of legumes, seed and nuts, vegetables and fishes and shells than the general female population who never had been diagnosed with cancer (p<0.05). Conclusions: Our study results suggested that the intakes of nutrients and foods varied by time since surgery and cancer stage among breast cancer survivors and dietary intakes among breast cancer survivors differed from that in the general population. Further prospective studies are warranted to explore the association between dietary intakes of specific food items and survival among Korean breast cancer survivors.

Social Adjustment of Adolescent Cancer Survivors: A Concept Analysis

  • Oh, Su-Mi;Lee, Hyejung;Kim, Sue;Kim, Sanghee;Lyu, Chuhl Joo
    • Child Health Nursing Research
    • /
    • v.25 no.3
    • /
    • pp.290-302
    • /
    • 2019
  • Purpose: This study aimed to identify the attributes of social adjustment among adolescent cancer survivors using concept analysis and to propose a definition of the concept. Methods: In accordance with the hybrid model of concept analysis, this study employed a three-phase circular process comprising theoretical, fieldwork, and final analysis phases. A thorough literature review was conducted using MEDLINE, Embase, and Korean databases, followed by qualitative fieldwork with seven participants. The results derived from the theoretical and fieldwork phases were integrated into the final analysis phase. Results: Four attributes of social adjustment were found in adolescent cancer survivors: having harmonious relationships with friends, having harmonious relationships with boy/girlfriends, fulfilling their present roles, and planning for and expecting future roles. The following definition of social adjustment of adolescent cancer survivors is proposed: "the conquering of difficulties arising from the continuum of childhood cancer and the achievement of the developmental tasks of typical adolescents." Conclusion: Social adjustment of childhood cancer survivors is crucial for integrating them into society. The findings of this study provide a basis for developing an instrument to measure the social adjustment of adolescent cancer survivors and for developing of interventions that target this group.

Experiences of Self-management Support among Breast Cancer Survivors (유방암 생존자의 자가관리 지지 경험)

  • Heo, Seok-Mo;Heo, Narae
    • Korean Journal of Adult Nursing
    • /
    • v.28 no.4
    • /
    • pp.470-481
    • /
    • 2016
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore self-management support experiences among breast cancer survivors. Methods: Individual in-depth interviews were performed for survivors who had treated breast cancer after completion of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Data were collected from April 2014 to July 2014 and analyzed using phenomenological method by Colaizzi. Results: Five essential themes were found as follows: 1) Need for continuous help and support to maintain self-management, 2) Need for professional resources to carry out regular exercise, 3) Overcoming psychological difficulties through others rather than health care professionals, 4) Disappointment with time with and circumstances of health care consultation, 5) Dependence on means of media for health related information. Conclusion: The results might contribute to an understanding of self-management support experienced by breast cancer survivors in Korea. It is suggested that evidence-based program for self-management support should be developed and applied to nursing intervention for breast cancer survivors.

Supportive Care Needs of Iranian Cancer Survivors and Relationships with Social Support

  • Faghani, Safieh;Mohammadian, Robab;Rahmani, Azad;Mohajjel-Aghdam, Ali-Reza;Hassankhani, Hadi;Azadi, Arman
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.16 no.15
    • /
    • pp.6339-6345
    • /
    • 2015
  • Background: Assessment of supportive care needs of cancer survivors and identifying factors affecting such needs is important for implementation of any supportive care programs. So, the aims of present study were to investigate the supportive care needs of Iranian cancer survivors and relationships with social support. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-correlational study two hundred and fifty cancer survivors participated via convenient sampling methods. The Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-SF34) and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) were used for data collection. SPSS software was applied and univariate regression was used for examine relationships of supportive care needs with social support. Results: Participants demonstrated many unmet supportive care needs, especially in health system and information and psychological domains. In addition, participants reported that family members and significant others were their main source of support. Also, social support has a significant correlation with all domains of supportive care needs. Conclusions: There is an indispensable need for establishment of supportive care programs for Iranian cancer survivors. In addition, family members of family members of such survivors are an important resource to help develop such programs.

Health-Related Quality of Life in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors: A Prospective Cohort Study

  • Kang, Danbee;Cho, Juhee;Kim, Im Ryung;Kim, Mi Kyung;Kim, Won Seog;Kim, Seok Jin
    • Cancer Research and Treatment
    • /
    • v.50 no.4
    • /
    • pp.1051-1063
    • /
    • 2018
  • Purpose We evaluated health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in long-term survivors of indolent and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Materials and Methods The HRQOL was assessed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality-of-Life Questionnaire Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) at diagnosis in NHL patients between 2008 and 2011, and follow-up evaluation was conducted from June 2014 to February 2015 using EORTC QLQ-C30 and the quality of life in cancer survivors (QOL-CS) questionnaire. We used linear mixed models to compare changes in HRQOL between indolent and aggressive NHL over time. Results The HRQOL of long-term survivors with aggressive NHL improved to the similar level of indolent NHL during the follow-up survey. However, survivors of NHL were found to fear the probability of relapse and second malignancy, and the degree of fear was not different between survivors with aggressive stage I/II or III/IV NHL (p > 0.05). Furthermore, a half of survivors reported impaired sense of psychosocial well-being regardless of aggressiveness and stage during follow-up survey. More than 65% of survivors thought they did not receive sufficient support from others, and patients who had financial difficulties at diagnosis were more frequently associated with suffering from insufficient support. Impaired physical and cognitive functioning at diagnosis was significantly associated with lack of life purpose in long-term survivors. Conclusion The HRQOL of aggressive NHL survivors improved to a similar level to that of indolent NHL. However, the majority of survivors still had fear of relapse, and psychosocial well-being remained unmet needs.

Social Support and its Predictors Among Iranian Cancer Survivors

  • Faghani, Safieh;Rahmani, Azad;Parizad, Naser;Mohajjel-Aghdam, Ali-Reza;Hassankhani, Hadi;Mohammadpoorasl, Asghar
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.15 no.22
    • /
    • pp.9767-9771
    • /
    • 2014
  • Background: Social support is an important factor in psycho-social well-being of cancer survivors. There is little information about level of social support and its predictors among cancer survivors in Iran or other Middle Eastern countries. The aims of present study were to determine the social support and its prediction factors among Iranian cancer survivors. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-correlational study 187 cancer patients in one educational center and one private oncology office in northwest of Iran participated using a convenient sampling method. The data collection tool consisted of a researcher-prepared checklist and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support Assessment (MSPSS). Data analysis was performed using SPSS statistical software with descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analysis. Results: The total score of MSPSS was 68 from a possible score between 7 and 84. Participants believed that they received a high level of support from their family members and significant others. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that single and depressed cancer survivors and participants with lower levels of physical activity believed that they received lower levels of social support. Conclusions: Iranian cancer survivors receive high levels of social support and family members are the most important source of this support. In planning any supportive care program for Iranian cancer survivors this strength should be considered. Especially, single and depressed and patients with lower levels of physical activity need more attention.

Return to Work in Multi-ethnic Breast Cancer Survivors - A Qualitative Inquiry

  • Tan, Foo Lan;Loh, Siew Yim;Su, TinTin;Veloo, V.W.;Ng, Lee Luan
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.13 no.11
    • /
    • pp.5791-5797
    • /
    • 2012
  • Introduction: Return-to-work (RTW) can be a problematic occupational issue with detrimental impact on the quality of life of previously-employed breast cancer survivors. This study explored barriers and facilitators encountered during the RTW process in the area of cancer survivorship. Materials and Methods: Six focus groups were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide on 40 informants (employed multiethnic survivors). Survivors were stratified into three groups for successfully RTW, and another three groups of survivors who were unable to return to work. Each of the three groups was ethnically homogeneous. Thematic analysis using a constant comparative approach was aided by in vivo software. Results: Participants shared numerous barriers and facilitators which directly or interactively affect RTW. Key barriers were physical-psychological after-effects of treatment, fear of potential environment hazards, high physical job demand, intrusive negative thoughts and overprotective family. Key facilitators were social support, employer support, and regard for financial independence. Across ethnic groups, the main facilitators were financial-independence (for Chinese), and socialisation opportunity (for Malay). A key barrier was after-effects of treatment, expressed across all ethnic groups. Conclusions: Numerous barriers were identified in the non-RTW survivors. Health professionals and especially occupational therapists should be consulted to assist the increasing survivors by providing occupational rehabilitation to enhance RTW amongst employed survivors. Future research to identify prognostic factors can guide clinical efforts to restore cancer survivors to their desired level/type of occupational functioning for productivity and wellbeing.

Influence of Offspring on Quality of Life among Cancer Patients and Survivors: Results from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA), 2008-2011

  • Kim, Jae-Hyun;Park, Eun-Cheol
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
    • /
    • v.15 no.23
    • /
    • pp.10531-10537
    • /
    • 2015
  • Background: To examine whether offspring improve or reduce quality of life (QOL) among cancer patients and survivors. Materials and Methods: We used data from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA) from 2008 to 2011. There were 490 research subjects in our study: 245 cancer patients and survivors and 245 controls matched using propensity scores. Results: For cancer patients and survivors with no offspring, the QOL estimate was -2.831 lower (SE: 5.508, p-value: 0.623) than that of those with two offspring, while for those with five or more offspring, the QOL estimate was 7.336 higher (SE: 2.840, p-value: 0.036). For non-cancer patients and survivors with one child, the QOL estimate was -11.258 lower (SE: 2.430, p-value: 0.002) than that of those with two offspring, while for those with five or more offspring, the QOL estimate was -4.881 lower (SE: 2.484, p-value: 0.090). Conclusions: This article provides evidence for a beneficial effect of offspring upon QOL in cancer patients and survivors, indicating that offspring are important for them.

Psychosocial aspects of childhood cancer survivors

  • Seo, Jong-Jin
    • Clinical and Experimental Pediatrics
    • /
    • v.53 no.4
    • /
    • pp.471-476
    • /
    • 2010
  • The majority of childhood cancer survivors and their families will be psychologically healthy, but may desire and benefit from preventive care. A significant portion of the survivor population will be psychosocially distressed in various aspects by their harsh experience of long cancer treatment, and may warrant professional intervention and treatment. Pediatricians should be aware of the late psychological effects that can occur a year or 2 after treatment, possibly in many aspects of a survivor's life. Not only the cancer diagnosis, but also treatments such as chemotherapy, irradiation, and surgical intervention may exert different long-term effects on the psychosocial outcomes of survivors. Pediatricians need to be more concerned with maintaining and improving the psychological health of this growing number of childhood cancer survivors through long-term follow-up clinics, community support, or self-help groups. Research on all of the psychosocial aspects of childhood cancer survivors is important to recognize the reality and problems they face in Korea.