• Title, Summary, Keyword: breast cancer survival

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Survival Analysis of Breast Cancer Patients in Northwest Iran

  • Ziaei, Jamal Eivazi;Sanaat, Zohreh;Asvadi, Iraj;Dastgiri, Saeed;Pourzand, Ali;Vaez, Jalil
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.1
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    • pp.39-42
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    • 2013
  • Background: Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer among Iranian women; however limited studies have been conducted to address survival rates. Objective: The objective was to examine survival rates in Tabriz (Northwest of Iran) and comparing with those of data reported from other cities and countries. Methods: Survival rates were calculated for one, three, five, seven and ten years for 271 breast cancer patients referred to one university clinic during 1997-2008. Results: Survival analysis demonstrated a lower survival rate compared to western countries. Conclusions: Survival rates for our patients are similar/better than other cities in Iran, but lower than certain European countries and the US. Further studies with a higher number of patients are now required.

Clinical Characteristics and Survival Analysis of Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes with Hepatic Metastases

  • Ge, Qi-Dong;Lv, Ning;Kong, Ya-Nan;Xie, Xin-Hua;He, Ni;Xie, Xiao-Ming;Wei, Wei-Dong
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.10
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    • pp.5081-5086
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    • 2012
  • Background: The liver is one of the most common metastatic sites of breast cancer, hepatic metastases developing in 6%-25% of patients with breast cancer and being associated with a poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to analyze the survival and clinical characteristics of patients with hepatic metastases from breast cancer of different molecular subtypes and to investigate the prognostic and predictive factors that effect clinical outcome. Methods: We retrospectively studied the charts of 104 patients with breast cancer hepatic metastases diagnosed at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center from December 1990 to June 2009. Subtypes were defined as luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) enriched, triple-negative (TN). Prognostic factor correlations with clinical features and treatment approaches were assessed at the diagnosis of hepatic metastases. Results: The median survival time was 16.0 months, and the one-, two- three-, four-, five-year survival rates were 63.5%, 31.7%, 15.6%, 10.8%, and 5.4%, respectively. Median survival periods after hepatic metastases were 19.3 months (luminal A), 13.3 months (luminal B), 18.9 months (HER2-enriched), and 16.1 months (TN, P=0.11). In multivariate analysis, a 2 year-interval from initial diagnosis to hepatic metastasis, treatment with endocrine therapy, and surgery were independent prognostic factors. Endocrine therapy could improve the survival of luminal subtypes (P=0.004) and was a favorable prognostic factor (median survival 23.4 months vs. 13.8 months, respectively, P=0.011). Luminal A group of patients treated with endocrine therapy did significantly better than the Luminal A group of patients treated without endocrine therapy (median survival of 48.9 vs. 13.8 months, P=0.003). Conclusions: Breast cancer subtypes were not associated with survival after hepatic metastases. Endocrine therapy was a significantly favorable treatment for patients with luminal subtype.

Effect of Lymphangiogenesis and Lymphovascular Invasion on the Survival Pattern of Breast Cancer Patients

  • Sahoo, Pradyumna Kumar;Jana, Debarshi;Mandal, Palash Kumar;Basak, Samindranath
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.15
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    • pp.6287-6293
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    • 2014
  • Background: Invasion of breast cancer cells into blood and lymphatic vessels is one of the most important steps for metastasis. In this study the prognostic relevance of lymphangiogenesis and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) in breast cancer patients was evaluated in terms of survival. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study concerned 518 breast cancer patients who were treated at Department of Surgical Oncology, Saroj Gupta Cancer Centre and Research Institute, Kolkata-700063, West Bengal, India, a reputed cancer centre and research institute of eastern India between January 2006 and December 2007. Results: The median overall survival and disease free survival of the patients were 60 months and 54 months respectively. As per Log-rank test, poor overall as well as disease free survival pattern was observed for LVI positive patients as compared with LVI negative patients (p<0.01). Also poor overall as well as disease free survival pattern was observed for perineural invasion (PNI) positive patients as compared to PNI negative patients (p<0.01). Conclusions: From this study it is evident that LVI and PNI are strongly associated with outcome in terms of disease free as well as overall survival in breast cancer patients. Thus LVI and PNI constitute potential targets for treatment of breast cancer patients. We advocate incorporating their status into breast cancer staging systems.

Influence of Ethnicity on Survival of Breast Cancer Patients in Turkey

  • Kuzhan, Abdurahman;Adli, Mustafa;Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.21
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    • pp.9199-9202
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    • 2014
  • Background: Kurdish women with breast cancer have more unfavorable prognostic factors than their Turkish and Arab counterparts. However, the effects of these factors on breast cancer survival among these ethnic groups remain unclear. We therefore investigated the impact of ethnicity on survival in breast cancer patients in Turkey. Materials and Methods: Ethnicity, age, stage at diagnosis, tumor characteristics, treatments given (surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone therapy), and survival times were recorded. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate the overall survival times and survival plots. Log-rank test was used to compare the survival curves.Results: Of the 723 breast cancer patients included in the study, 496 (68.7%) were Turkish, 189 (26.2%) were Kurdish, 37 (5.1%) were Arabic and 1 was Armenian. Kurdish women with breast cancer had larger tumor sizes and higher rates of hormone receptor negative tumors than Turkish and Arab patients. Mean follow-up time was 118.4 [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 95.4-141.3] months, and it was 129.9 (95% CI: 93.7-166.2), 124.2 (95% CI: 108.4-140.1) and 103.1 (95% CI: 85.9-120.4) months for Turkish, Arabic and Kurdish patients, respectively. Conclusions: Kurdish ethnicity is associated with higher rates of hormone receptor negative and triple-negative tumors and with worse survival. Clinical and epidemiological research is warranted to elucidate reasons underlying overall survival, variations in tumor biology, differences in treatment responsiveness, and effects of social factors among ethnic groups in Turkey.

Determination of a Change Point in the Age at Diagnosis of Breast Cancer Using a Survival Model

  • Abdollahi, Mahbubeh;Hajizadeh, Ebrahim;Baghestani, Ahmad Reza;Haghighat, Shahpar
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.sup3
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    • pp.5-10
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    • 2016
  • Breast cancer, the second cause of cancer-related death after lung cancer and the most common cancer in women after skin cancer, is curable if detected in early stages of clinical presentation. Knowledge as to any age cut-off points which might have significance for prognostic groups is important in screening and treatment planning. Therefore, determining a change-point could improve resource allocation. This study aimed to determine if a change point for survival might exist in the age of breast cancer diagnosis. This study included 568 cases of breast cancer that were registered in Breast Cancer Research Center, Tehran, Iran, during the period 1986-2006 and were followed up to 2012. In the presence of curable cases of breast cancer, a change point in the age of breast cancer diagnosis was estimated using a mixture survival cure model. The data were analyzed using SPSS (versions 20) and R (version 2.15.0) software. The results revealed that a change point in the age of breast cancer diagnosis was at 50 years age. Based on our estimation, 35% of the patients diagnosed with breast cancer at age less than or equal to 50 years of age were cured while the figure was 57% for those diagnosed after 50 years of age. Those in the older age group had better survival compared to their younger counterparts during 12 years of follow up. Our results suggest that it is better to estimate change points in age for cancers which are curable in early stages using survival cure models, and that the cure rate would increase with timely screening for breast cancer.

Incidence and Survival in Breast Cancer Patients and Stressful Life Events

  • Fallah, Raheleh;Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil;Azargashb, Eznollah;Khayamzadeh, E
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.sup3
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    • pp.245-252
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    • 2016
  • Due to increasing incidence of breast cancer, recognition of risk factors has become increasingly important. Over the past few decades, among risk factors of this disease, stressful life events have attracted particular attention, but their relationship with breast cancer incidence and survival remains a mystery. This study aimed to examine the relationship between severe stressful life events and incidence and survival of women with breast cancer. In this case-control study, using a structured telephone interview with 355 women with breast cancer and also with 516 women with benign breast diseases who were matched in demographic characteristics, necessary information about the experience of major stressful events in the years before the diagnosis were collected. Data were analyzed using statistical methods of ${\chi}^2$, t, and Kaplan-Meier with a significance level of <0.05. Generally, in the case and control groups, there were no significant association between experience of stressful life events and incidence of breast cancer. Regarding associations between each of the events and incidence of breast cancer only "severe interpersonal problems with spouse" was significant. In the breast cancer group, even after controlling confounding variables, there was no significant association between major stressful events and disease-free survival, or overall 5-and 10-year survival. In this study, only "severe interpersonal problems with spouse" was confirmed as a risk factor. This result can be useful in developing preventive policies. More research regarding the interactive effects of psycho-social factors in the incidence and survival of breast cancer with stressful life events is recommended.

Application of Cox and Parametric Survival Models to Assess Social Determinants of Health Affecting Three-Year Survival of Breast Cancer Patients

  • Mohseny, Maryam;Amanpour, Farzaneh;Mosavi-Jarrahi, Alireza;Jafari, Hossein;Moradi-Joo, Mohammad;Monfared, Esmat Davoudi
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.17 no.sup3
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    • pp.311-316
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    • 2016
  • Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality in Iran. Social determinants of health are among the key factors affecting the pathogenesis of diseases. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the social determinants of breast cancer survival time with parametric and semi-parametric regression models. It was conducted on male and female patients diagnosed with breast cancer presenting to the Cancer Research Center of Shohada-E-Tajrish Hospital from 2006 to 2010. The Cox proportional hazard model and parametric models including the Weibull, log normal and log-logistic models were applied to determine the social determinants of survival time of breast cancer patients. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) was used to assess the best fit. Statistical analysis was performed with STATA (version 11) software. This study was performed on 797 breast cancer patients, aged 25-93 years with a mean age of 54.7 (${\pm}11.9$) years. In both semi-parametric and parametric models, the three-year survival was related to level of education and municipal district of residence (P<0.05). The AIC suggested that log normal distribution was the best fit for the three-year survival time of breast cancer patients. Social determinants of health such as level of education and municipal district of residence affect the survival of breast cancer cases. Future studies must focus on the effect of childhood social class on the survival times of cancers, which have hitherto only been paid limited attention.

Serum Adiponectin but not Leptin at Diagnosis as a Predictor of Breast Cancer Survival

  • Lee, Sang-Ah;Sung, Hyuna;Han, Wonshik;Noh, Dong-Young;Ahn, Sei-Hyun;Kang, Daehee
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.15
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    • pp.6137-6143
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    • 2014
  • Limited numbers of epidemiological studies have examined the relationship between adipokines and breast cancer survival. Preoperative serum levels of obesity-related adipokines (leptin and adiponectin) were here measured in 370 breast cancer patients, recruited from two hospitals in Korea. We examined the association between those adipokines and disease-free survival (DFS). The TNM stage, ER status and histological grade were aslo assessed in relation to breast cancer survival. Elevated adiponectin levels were associated with reduced DFS of breast cancer ($P_{trend}=0.03$) among patients with normal body weight, predominantly in postmenopausal women. There was no association of leptin with breast cancer survival. In conclusion, our study suggests that high levels of adiponectin at diagnosis are associated with breast cancer survival among women with normal body weight.

Who are the Breast Cancer Survivors in Malaysia?

  • Ibrahim, Nor Idawaty;Dahlui, M.;Aina, E.N.;Al-Sadat, N.
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.5
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    • pp.2213-2218
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    • 2012
  • Introduction: Worldwide, breast cancer is the commonest cause of cancer death in women. However, the survival rate varies across regions at averages of 73%and 57% in the developed and developing countries, respectively. Objective: This study aimed to determine the survival rate of breast cancer among the women of Malaysia and characteristics of the survivors. Method: A retrospective cohort study was conducted on secondary data obtained from the Breast Cancer Registry and medical records of breast cancer patients admitted to Hospital Kuala Lumpur from 2005 to 2009. Survival data were validated with National Birth and Death Registry. Statistical analysis applied logistic regression, the Cox proportional hazard model, the Kaplan-Meier method and log rank test. Results: A total of 868 women were diagnosed with breast cancer between January 2005 and December 2009, comprising 58%, 25% and 17% Malays, Chinese and Indians, respectively. The overall survival rate was 43.5% (CI 0.573-0.597), with Chinese, Indians and Malays having 5 year survival rates of 48.2% (CI 0.444-0.520), 47.2% (CI 0.432-0.512) and 39.7% (CI 0.373-0.421), respectively (p<0.05). The survival rate was lower as the stages increased, with the late stages were mostly seen among the Malays (46%), followed by Chinese (36%) and Indians (34%). Size of tumor>3.0cm; lymph node involvement, ERPR, and HER 2 status, delayed presentation and involvement of both breasts were among other factors that were associated with poor survival. Conclusions: The overall survival rate of Malaysian women with breast cancer was lower than the western figures with Malays having the lowest because they presented at late stage, after a long duration of symptoms, had larger tumor size, and had more lymph nodes affected. There is an urgent need to conduct studies on why there is delay in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer women in Malaysia.

Comparison of Survival Rates between Chinese and Thai Patients with Breast Cancer

  • Che, Yanhua;You, Jing;Zhou, Shaojiang;Li, Li;Wang, Yeying;Yang, Yue;Guo, Xuejun;Ma, Sijia;Sriplung, Hutcha
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.15
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    • pp.6029-6033
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    • 2014
  • The burden and severity of a cancer can be reflected by patterns of survival. Breast cancer prognosis between two countries with a different socioeconomic status and cultural beliefs may exhibit wide variation. This study aimed to describe survival in patients with breast cancer in China and Thailand in relation to demographic and clinical prognostic information. Materials and Methods: We compared the survival of 1,504 Chinese women in Yunnan province and 929 Thai women in Songkhla with breast cancer from 2006 to 2010. Descriptive prognostic comparisons between the Chinese and Thai women were performed by relative survival analysis. A Cox regression model was used to calculate the hazard ratios of death, taking into account the age, disease stage, period of diagnosis and country. Results: The overall 5-year survival proportion for patients diagnosed with breast cancer for Yunnan province (0.72) appeared slightly better than Songkhla (0.70) without statistical significance. Thai women diagnosed with distant and regional breast cancer had poorer survival than Chinese women. Disease stage was the most important determinant of survival from the results of Cox regression model. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients in Kunming had slightly greater five-year survival rate than patients in Songkhla. Both Chinese and Thai women need improvement in prognosis, which could conceivably be attained through increased public education and awareness regarding early detection and compliance to treatment protocols.