• Title, Summary, Keyword: adult attachment

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The Effects of Adult Attachment on Parenting Stress in Preshooler's mothers : Marital Conflict as a Mediating Variable (유아기 자녀를 둔 어머니의 성인애착이 양육스트레스에 미치는 영향 : 부부갈등을 매개변인으로)

  • Ye, Nam-Hee;Min, Ha-Yeoung
    • Journal of Korean Home Management Association
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    • v.28 no.5
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    • pp.67-74
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    • 2010
  • This study investigates the effects of adult attachment on parenting stress using marital conflict as a mediating variable for mothers of preschoolers. The subjects were 370 mothers who lived with at least one preschooler in Daegu or Gyeongbuk Province. The collected data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation as well as single and multiple regressions that used SPSS Win 15.0. The results were as follows: (1) The adult attachment by mothers was negatively associated with parenting stress. The adult attachment level of mothers becomes lower as the perception of parenting stress increases. (2) The adult attachment by mothers was negatively associated with marital conflict. That is, the adult attachment level of mothers becomes lower as the perception of marital conflict increases. (3) The effects of adult attachment in parenting stress by mothers was reducing explanation when controlled for the marital conflict. Adult attachment which influenced the parenting stress of mothers was partially mediated by marital conflict. The results of the study imply that to reduce the parenting stress of mothers, there is a need to improve spousal relationships, in addition, there is a need for more active support to improve conjugal relations for mothers whose adult attachment was not stable.

Intergenerational Transmission of Mother-Daughter Attachment and Unmarried Adult Daughter's Ego-Resiliency (모녀애착의 세대 전수와 성인 미혼 딸의 자아탄력성)

  • Im, Kyoung-Ei;Chun, Young-Ju
    • Journal of Korean Home Management Association
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    • v.27 no.1
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    • pp.197-208
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    • 2009
  • The purpose of this study is to examine the intergenerational transmission of mother-daughter attachment across three generations, and to determine whether the mother-daughter attachment of three generations influences the adult daughter's ego-resilience. The subjects of this study were 310 unmarried adult women aged 20${\sim}$29, residing in the Busan area, and their 310 middle-aged mothers. The mothers responded to two sets of questionnaire investigating their attachment to their mothers (G1-G2) in the past and the present attachment to their adult daughters (G2-G3). Meanwhile, the adult daughters were given questionnaires regarding their attachment to their mothers and their ego-resiliency. The measurements used for this study were the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA) and the Ego-Resiliency Scale (ER). Among the distributed questionnaires, 265 sets were collected and 252 sets were actually analyzed using SPSS 12.0 after 13 sets had been excluded due to incomplete data. Basic statistics were used such as frequency analysis, Pearson's correlation and hierarchical regression analysis. The study results were as follows. First, the adult daughter-mother (G2-G3) attachment was explained mostly by mother-grandmother (G1-G2) attachment, daughter's age, and economic status of the family. The strongest factor was the mother-grandmother attachment which implies the transmission of attachment through generations. Second, among the factors that influenced the ego-resilience of an unmarried adult daughter, attachment to one's mother perceived by the daughter turned out to be the most significant. Especially, the more positive the adult daughter's emotion toward her mother and the higher the daughter's education, the stronger the ego-resilience of the adult single daughter was. It was concluded that the mother-daughter attachment remained consistent throughout three generations, which influenced the social-psychological adjustment of the adult unmarried daughter.

Determining the Relationship among Organizational Commitment, Occupational Stress, and Interpersonal Relations according to Adult Attachment Styles of Clinical Dental Hygienists

  • Choi, Mi-Hyun;Min, Hee-Hong
    • Journal of dental hygiene science
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    • v.19 no.2
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    • pp.122-132
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    • 2019
  • Background: This study aimed to identify the types of adult attachment and determine the relationship between adult attachment and job factors in dental hygienists. Ultimately, it was necessary to identify the need for a secure attachment to improve the quality of clinical dental hygienist's services. Methods: Data of 454 clinical dental hygienists working in dental hospitals or clinics were collected. The research tools consisted of items related to the general and work characteristics of dental hygienists (9 items), adult attachment styles (36 items), organizational commitments (12 items), occupational stress (15 items), and interpersonal relations (18 items). Cronbach's ${\alpha}$ of each tool was ${\geq}0.7$. Results: Most of the participants had fearful attachment styles, followed by dismissing-avoidance, security, and preoccupation. Security was the highest level of organizational commitment according to the adult attachment style, although the differences of the levels were insignificant. For occupational stress, preoccupation was the highest, followed by fearful, security, and dismissing-avoidance, and the differences were significant (p<0.001). For interpersonal relations, security was the highest, followed by preoccupation, dismissing-avoidance, and fearful in order, and the differences were significant (p<0.001). Conclusion: Job stress and interpersonal relation ability according to the adult attachment style of clinical dental hygienists had significant results. Thus, the development of attachment improvement programs by personal style, development of differentiated clinical education and its application, and improvements in the adult attachment styles of clinical dental hygienists would be required rather than simply presenting the needs to collectively improvement the working environment.

The Impact of Parents′ Marital Conflict and Adult Attachment on College Students′ Ego-Resiliency (부모간의 갈등 및 성인애착에 따른 대학생의 자아탄력성)

  • 이영미;민하영;이윤주
    • Journal of Korean Home Management Association
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    • v.22 no.4
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    • pp.63-72
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    • 2004
  • This study investigated the impact of parents' marital conflict and adult attachment on ego-resiliency among college students. The participants were three hundred sixty six undergraduate students (118 men and 248 women) enrolled in a university in Gyeongbuk Province. Survey questionnaires were used to measure parents' marital conflict perceived by the students, adult attachment, and ego-resiliency. Data were analyzed by means, standard deviations, t-tests, one-way ANOVA, Scheffe test, correlation, and multiple regressions. Results are summarized in the following: (1) Male students' ego-resiliency level was higher than lunate students'. (2) Students' ego-resiliency was higher in the group whose parents remained married than in the group whose parents did not. (3) The level of parents' marital conflict perceived by students was negatively correlated with their ego-resiliency. The level of adult attachment was positively correlated with students' ego-resiliency. (4) Regression analysis showed that adult attachment was more influential on college students' ego-resiliency than parents' marital conflict as perceived by the students.

Mother's Internal Working Model for Attachment Relationships; Adult Attachment Interview (어머니의 부모와의 애착관계에 대한 내적 실행모델 -성인애착면접(Adult Attachment Interview)을 중심으로-)

  • 장미자
    • Journal of the Korean Home Economics Association
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    • v.36 no.7
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    • pp.69-82
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    • 1998
  • The purpose of the study was to examine the adaptability of AAI(Adult Attachment Interview) in Korea. The subjects were 20 mothers who had toddlers from middle class. AAI was administrated to them. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The results showed that Korean Mothers' AAI classifications were Secure-Autonomous(F) 60%, Insecure=Dismissing(Ds) 20%, Insecure-Preoccupied(E) 5%, Insecure-Unresolved/disorganized(U/d) 15%. The classification of AAI was significantly related with mothers' education, but not mothers' age. Autonomous mothers discribed consistently in evaluation of attachment-related experiences and valued attachment. Dismissing mothers showed a incoherent discourse and dismissed attachment-related experiences and relations. Preoccupied mother sticted to past attachment relationship and perplexed with evaluation of these experiences. Unresolved mothers showed lapse during discussion of loss or abuse and were not free from past experiences. Based on the findings of the study, it was found th AAI(Adult Attachment Interview) can be used for evaluation of mother's internal working model in Korean culture.

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The Relationship Among Mothers with Adult Attachment, Anxiety, Depression, and Parenting Stress Who are Rearing Preschoolers (유아기 자녀를 둔 어머니의 성인애착과 불안, 우울 및 양육스트레스와의 관계)

  • Moon, Young-Kyung;Min, Hyun-Sook
    • Journal of Korean Home Management Association
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    • v.26 no.5
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    • pp.165-176
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    • 2008
  • The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between mother's self-reported adult attachment, anxiety, depression, and parenting stress and the rearing of preschoolers. Based on a sample of 96 young mothers, this study demonstrated the association between a mother's self-report of attachment avoidance and attachment anxiety, anxiety, depression, and parenting stress. And also, the result showed that the greatest portion of attachment classification answered by mothers was secure attachment, and the portion of preoccupied and dismissing attachment was the same. It is also shown that mother's anxiety was different depending on adult attachment classifications.

Adult Attachment Style in Mothers of Children with Selective Mutism (선택적 함구증 환아 어머니의 성인애착유형)

  • Cha Sang-Hun;Jeong Sung-Hoon;Chung Un-Sun
    • Journal of the Korean Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
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    • v.17 no.2
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    • pp.106-113
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    • 2006
  • Objectives : The purpose of this study was to investigate the adult attachment style characteristics of mothers with selective mutism children and their relations to selective mutism. Methods :The subjects of this study were 15 mothers with selective mutism children who were diagnosed by DSM-IV criteria at psychiatry outpatient department of Kyungpook National University Hospital from March 1998 to February 2005. The controls of this study were 30 mothers with normal children who are in the second grade of elementary school in Daegu. We assessed the adult attachment style characteristics of these mothers by Revised Adult Attachment Scale, and Reciprocal Attachment Questionnaire-Korean version, self-report attachment style questionnaire. Results : 1) On the self-report attachment style questionnaire, it revealed that mothers with selective mutism children had both of the secure and the dismissing-avoidant types predominantly and the tendency that mothers with selective mutism children more commonly had dismissing-avoidant type than controls did. 2) On the comparison of attachment quality of mothers, although only the anxiety subscale difference was significant, it revealed that mothers with selective mutism children had generally lower score pattern in all of closeness, dependence and anxiety subscale than controls did. It was consistent with the consequence of self-report attachment style questionnaire in this study. Conclusion : This study showed that the distribution of adult attachment style of mothers with selective mutism children was different from those of controls. The dismissing-avoidant attachment style was predominant in mothers with selective mutism children. we suppose the possibility that the dismissing-avoidant attachment style of mothers with selective mutism children has relation with selective mutism.

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Job Stress and Organizational Commitment with Regard to Adult Attachment Style of Small and Medium-sized Hospital Nurses (중소병원 간호사의 성인애착유형에 따른 직무스트레스 및 조직몰입)

  • Jeong, Eun-Sook;Kim, Jiwon;Bae, Sung-Yoon
    • Korea Journal of Hospital Management
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    • v.23 no.3
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    • pp.72-86
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    • 2018
  • This study was designed to identify the adult attachment style among hospital nurses, and to examine its effect on nurses' job stress and organizational commitment. Self-administered survey questionnaires with structured instruments were developed, and a total of 281 responses from five small to medium-sized hospitals were used for statistical analyses with SPSS Windows version 24.0 program. Major findings of the study are three fold. First, among the four styles of adult attachment, found in 30.6% of survey respondents, stability style was the most popular, followed by fear style(28.5%), disregard style(24.2%), and devotion style(17.8%). Second, according to the general characteristics of study participants, adult attachment style showed a significant difference in age($x^2=23.29$, p=.025). Third, multiple regression analyses showed that hospital nurses with the fear style among other adult attachment styles had a significantly higher job stress compared to those with the stability style. The fear style also affected the nurses' organizational commitment level in a negative way, but the effect was only marginal. Results from this study suggest that customized program based on the nurses' adult attachment style should be developed to enhance their organizational commitment while reducing job stress in small to medium-sized hospitals.

Differences in Parenting Stress, Parenting Attitudes, and Parents' Mental Health According to Parental Adult Attachment Style

  • Kim, Do Hoon;Kang, Na Ri;Kwack, Young Sook
    • Journal of the Korean Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
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    • v.30 no.1
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    • pp.17-25
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    • 2019
  • Objectives: We aimed to compare the differences in parenting stress, parenting attitudes, and parents' mental health between different adult attachment styles. Methods: Forty-four parents who completed a parental education program were enrolled in our study. They completed the Korean version of the Experience of Close Relationship Revised, Korean-Parenting Stress Index-Short Form, Maternal Behavior Research Instrument, and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. Results: The avoidant attachment score positively correlated with parenting stress. The anxious attachment score showed a positive relationship with parenting stress, hostile parenting attitude, and psychopathology, but a negative association with an affectionate parenting attitude. The secure attachment group exhibited a more autonomous, affectionate parenting style and a less hostile parenting attitude and less parenting stress than the insecure attachment group. Dismissing-avoidant attachment parents reported significantly higher parenting stress scores than secure attachment parents. Preoccupied and fearful-avoidant attachment parents displayed a more hostile parenting style than secure attachment parents. Dismissing-avoidant and preoccupied parents reported a less affectionate parenting attitude than secure attachment parents. Conclusion: There were differences in parenting stress, parenting attitudes, and parents' mental health depending on the adult attachment style. More specific education and interventions based on parental attachment type are necessary for parents.

The Adult Attachment Interview and Childhood Experience of Low Income Married and Divorced Women (저소득층 이혼 여성의 성인애착과 아동기 경험비교 : 이혼 경험을 중심으로)

  • Lee, Kyung Sook;Jin, Mi Kyoung;Jung, Young Suk
    • Korean Journal of Child Studies
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    • v.28 no.2
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    • pp.137-153
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    • 2007
  • This research studied differences in the distribution of maternal attachment representation between divorced and non-divorced low income mothers, associations between their divorce and childhood experiences, and associations between maternal attachment representation and childhood experiences. Subjects were twenty each divorced and still-married women with low socioeconomic status. The Adult Attachment Interview was used to assess their attachment representation resulting in classification by four types; autonomous (F), dismissing (Ds), preoccupied (E), or unresolved/disorganized (Ud). The divorced women had more childhood experiences of being rejected and neglected by their mothers than the non-divorced women. This indicates that maternal childhood experiences were related to maternal attachment representation and divorce.

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