• Title, Summary, Keyword: Workflow

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A Visual Approach for Data-Intensive Workflow Validation

  • Park, Minjae;Ahn, Hyun;Kim, Kwanghoon Pio
    • Journal of Internet Computing and Services
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    • v.17 no.5
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    • pp.43-49
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    • 2016
  • This paper presents a workflow validation method for data-intensive graphical workflow models using real-time workflow tracing mode on data-intensive workflow designer. In order to model and validate workflows, we try to divide as modes have editable mode and tracing mode on data-intensive workflow designer. We could design data-intensive workflow using drag and drop in editable-mode, otherwise we could not design but view and trace workflow model in tracing mode. We would like to focus on tracing-mode for workflow validation, and describe how to use workflow tracing on data-intensive workflow model designer. Especially, it is support data centered operation about control logics and exchange variables on workflow runtime for workflow tracing.

A Taxonomy of Workflow Architectures

  • Kim, Kwang-Hoon;Paik, Su-Ki
    • Proceedings of the Korea Database Society Conference
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    • pp.525-543
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    • 1998
  • This paper proposes a conceptual taxonomy of architectures far workflow management systems. The systematic classification work is based on a framework for workflow architectures. The framework, consisting of generic-level, conceptual-level and implementation-level architectures, provides common architectural principles for designing a workflow management system. We define the taxonomy by considering the possibilities for centralization or distribution of data, control, and execution. That is, we take into account three criteria. How are the major components of a workflow model and system, like activities, roles, actors, and workcases, concretized in workflow architecture? Which of the components is represented as software modules of the workflow architecture? And how are they configured and operating in the architecture? The workflow components might be embodied, as active (processes or threads) modules or as passive (data) modules, in the software architecture of a workflow management system. One or combinations of the components might become software modules in the software architecture. Finally, they might be centralized or distributed. The distribution of the components should be broken into three: Vertically, Horizontally and Fully distributed. Through the combination of these aspects, we can conceptually generate about 64 software Architectures for a workflow management system. That is, it should be possible to comprehend and characterize all kinds of software architectures for workflow management systems including the current existing systems as well as future systems. We believe that this taxonomy is a significant contribution because it adds clarity, completeness, and "global perspective" to workflow architectural discussions. The vocabulary suggested here includes workflow levels and aspects, allowing very different architectures to be discussed, compared, and contrasted. Added clarity is obtained because similar architectures from different vendors that used different terminology and techniques can now be seen to be identical at the higher level. Much of the complexity can be removed by thinking of workflow systems. Therefore, it is used to categorize existing workflow architectures and suggest a plethora of new workflow architectures. Finally, the taxonomy can be used for sorting out gems and stones amongst the architectures possibly generated. Thus, it might be a guideline not only for characterizing the existing workflow management systems, but also for solving the long-term and short-term architectural research issues, such as dynamic changes in workflow, transactional workflow, dynamically evolving workflow, large-scale workflow, etc., that have been proposed in the literature.

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A Taxonomy of Workflow Architectures

  • Kim, Kwang-Hoon;Paik, Su-Ki
    • The Journal of Information Technology and Database
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    • v.5 no.1
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    • pp.97-108
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    • 1998
  • This paper proposes a conceptual taxonomy of architectures for workflow management systems. The systematic classification work is based on a framework for workflow architectures. The framework, consisting of generic-level, conceptual-level and implementation-level architectures, provides common architectural principles for designing a workflow management system. We define the taxonomy by considering the possibilities for centralization or distribution of data, control, and execution. That is, we take into account three criteria. How are the major components of a workflow model and system, like activities, roles, actors, and workcases, concretized in workflow architecture. Which of the components is represented as software modules of the workflow architecture\ulcorner And how are they configured and operating in the architecture\ulcorner The workflow components might be embodied, as active (processes or threads) modules or as passive (data) modules, in the software architecture of a workflow management system. One or combinations of the components might become software modules in the software architecture. Finally, they might be centralized or distributed. The distribution of the components should be broken into three: Vertically, Horizontally and Fully distributed. Through the combination of these aspects, we can conceptually generate about 64 software Architectures for a workflow management system. That is, it should be possible to comprehend and characterize all kinds of software architectures for workflow management systems including the current existing systems as well as future systems. We believe that this taxonomy is a significant contribution because it adds clarity, completeness, and global perspective to workflow architectural discussions. The vocabulary suggested here includes workflow levels and aspects, allowing very different architectures to be discussed, compared, and contrasted. Added clarity is obtained because similar architectures from different vendors that used different terminology and techniques can now be seen to be identical at the higher level. Much of the complexity can be removed by thinking of workflow systems. Therefore, it is used to categorize existing workflow architectures and suggest a plethora of new workflow architectures. Finally, the taxonomy can be used for sorting out gems and stones amongst the architectures possibly generated. Thus, it might be a guideline not only for characterizing the existing workflow management systems, but also for solving the long-term and short-term architectural research issues, such as dynamic changes in workflow, transactional workflow, dynamically evolving workflow, large-scale workflow, etc., that have been proposed in the literature.

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Predicting the popularity of TV-show through text mining of tweets: A Drama Case in South Korea

  • Kim, Do Yeon;Kim, Yoosin;Choi, Sang Hyun
    • Journal of Internet Computing and Services
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    • v.17 no.5
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    • pp.131-139
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    • 2016
  • This paper presents a workflow validation method for data-intensive graphical workflow models using real-time workflow tracing mode on data-intensive workflow designer. In order to model and validate workflows, we try to divide as modes have editable mode and tracing mode on data-intensive workflow designer. We could design data-intensive workflow using drag and drop in editable-mode, otherwise we could not design but view and trace workflow model in tracing mode. We would like to focus on tracing-mode for workflow validation, and describe how to use workflow tracing on data-intensive workflow model designer. Especially, it is support data centered operation about control logics and exchange variables on workflow runtime for workflow tracing.

A GraphML-based Visualization Framework for Workflow-Performers' Closeness Centrality Measurements

  • Kim, Min-Joon;Ahn, Hyun;Park, Minjae
    • KSII Transactions on Internet and Information Systems (TIIS)
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    • v.9 no.8
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    • pp.3216-3230
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    • 2015
  • A hot-issued research topic in the workflow intelligence arena is the emerging topic of "workflow-supported organizational social networks." These specialized social networks have been proposed to primarily represent the process-driven work-sharing and work-collaborating relationships among the workflow-performers fulfilling a series of workflow-related operations in a workflow-supported organization. We can discover those organizational social networks, and visualize its analysis results as organizational knowledge. In this paper, we are particularly interested in how to visualize the degrees of closeness centralities among workflow-performers by proposing a graphical representation schema based on the Graph Markup Language, which is named to ccWSSN-GraphML. Additionally, we expatiate on the functional expansion of the closeness centralization formulas so as for the visualization framework to handle a group of workflow procedures (or a workflow package) with organizational workflow-performers.

Defining and Discovering Cardinalities of the Temporal Workcases from XES-based Workflow Logs

  • Yun, Jaeyoung;Ahn, Hyun;Kim, Kwanghoon Pio
    • Journal of Internet Computing and Services
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    • v.20 no.3
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    • pp.77-84
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    • 2019
  • Workflow management system is a system that manages the workflow model which defines the process of work in reality. We can define the workflow process by sequencing jobs which is performed by the performers. Using the workflow management system, we can also analyze the flow of the process and revise it more efficiently. Many researches are focused on how to make the workflow process model more efficiently and manage it more easily. Recently, many researches use the workflow log files which are the execution history of the workflow process model performed by the workflow management system. Ourresearch group has many interests in making useful knowledge from the workflow event logs. In this paper we use XES log files because there are many data using this format. This papersuggests what are the cardinalities of the temporal workcases and how to get them from the workflow event logs. Cardinalities of the temporal workcases are the occurrence pattern of critical elements in the workflow process. We discover instance cardinalities, activity cardinalities and organizational resource cardinalities from several XES-based workflow event logs and visualize them. The instance cardinality defines the occurrence of the workflow process instances, the activity cardinality defines the occurrence of the activities and the organizational cardinality defines the occurrence of the organizational resources. From them, we expect to get many useful knowledge such as a patterns of the control flow of the process, frequently executed events, frequently working performer and etc. In further, we even expect to predict the original process model by only using the workflow event logs.

Workflow Mining based on Heuristic Approach using Log data (워크플로우 마이닝 : 휴리스틱 접근)

  • Lee, Myoung-Hee;Yoo, Cheol-Jung;Jang, Ok-Bae
    • Proceedings of the CALSEC Conference
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    • pp.195-200
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    • 2005
  • As the workflow systems are becoming complex and obscure, there are discrepancies between actual workflow process and designed process. Therefore, we have developed techniques for discovering workflow models. The starting point for such techniques is a so-called 'workflow log' containing information about the workflow process as it is actually being executed. This paper presents an algorithm of workflow process mining based on heuristic approach from the workflow log, which can be happen to business process system.

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An XPDL-Based Workflow Control-Structure and Data-Sequence Analyzer

  • Kim, Kwanghoon Pio
    • KSII Transactions on Internet and Information Systems (TIIS)
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    • v.13 no.3
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    • pp.1702-1721
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    • 2019
  • A workflow process (or business process) management system helps to define, execute, monitor and manage workflow models deployed on a workflow-supported enterprise, and the system is compartmentalized into a modeling subsystem and an enacting subsystem, in general. The modeling subsystem's functionality is to discover and analyze workflow models via a theoretical modeling methodology like ICN, to graphically define them via a graphical representation notation like BPMN, and to systematically deploy those graphically defined models onto the enacting subsystem by transforming into their textual models represented by a standardized workflow process definition language like XPDL. Before deploying those defined workflow models, it is very important to inspect its syntactical correctness as well as its structural properness to minimize the loss of effectiveness and the depreciation of efficiency in managing the corresponding workflow models. In this paper, we are particularly interested in verifying very large-scale and massively parallel workflow models, and so we need a sophisticated analyzer to automatically analyze those specialized and complex styles of workflow models. One of the sophisticated analyzers devised in this paper is able to analyze not only the structural complexity but also the data-sequence complexity, especially. The structural complexity is based upon combinational usages of those control-structure constructs such as subprocesses, exclusive-OR, parallel-AND and iterative-LOOP primitives with preserving matched pairing and proper nesting properties, whereas the data-sequence complexity is based upon combinational usages of those relevant data repositories such as data definition sequences and data use sequences. Through the devised and implemented analyzer in this paper, we are able eventually to achieve the systematic verifications of the syntactical correctness as well as the effective validation of the structural properness on those complicate and large-scale styles of workflow models. As an experimental study, we apply the implemented analyzer to an exemplary large-scale and massively parallel workflow process model, the Large Bank Transaction Workflow Process Model, and show the structural complexity analysis results via a series of operational screens captured from the implemented analyzer.

Workflow Specification Mining on Workflow Logs (워크플로우 로그에서 워크플로우 명세 탐사)

  • 정희택
    • Journal of the Korea Institute of Information and Communication Engineering
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    • v.6 no.8
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    • pp.1325-1335
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    • 2002
  • Workflow systems, automated business processing, have been generalized. In this paper, we propose a method to mine workflow specification on workflow logs. The method detects workflow specification considering cycle, AND and OR control flow between tasks. Also, we provide dynamic mining method to detect workflow specification in which log is generated.

A Theoretical Framework for Closeness Centralization Measurements in a Workflow-Supported Organization

  • Kim, Min-Joon;Ahn, Hyun;Park, Min-Jae
    • KSII Transactions on Internet and Information Systems (TIIS)
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    • v.9 no.9
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    • pp.3611-3634
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    • 2015
  • In this paper, we build a theoretical framework for quantitatively measuring and graphically representing the degrees of closeness centralization among performers assigned to enact a workflow procedure. The degree of closeness centralization of a workflow-performer reflects how near the performer is to the other performers in enacting a corresponding workflow model designed for workflow-supported organizational operations. The proposed framework comprises three procedural phases and four functional transformations, such as discovery, analysis, and quantitation phases, which carry out ICN-to-WsoN, WsoN-to-SocioMatrix, SocioMatrix-to-DistanceMatrix, and DistanceMatrix-to-CCV transformations. We develop a series of algorithmic formalisms for the procedural phases and their transformative functionalities, and verify the proposed framework through an operational example. Finally, we expatiate on the functional expansion of the closeness centralization formulas so as for the theoretical framework to handle a group of workflow procedures (or a workflow package) with organization-wide workflow-performers.