• Title, Summary, Keyword: Walter benjamin

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Changgyeongwon Ya-Aeng as Modern Urban Culture - An Interpretation based on Benjamin's Phantasmagoria - (근대 도시 문화로서 창경원 야앵 - 벤야민의 '판타스마고리아'를 중심으로 -)

  • Kwon, Young-Ran;Pae, Jeong-Hann
    • Journal of the Korean Institute of Landscape Architecture
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    • v.46 no.1
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    • pp.61-71
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    • 2018
  • This study sought to interpret the Ya-Aeng (夜櫻) from the viewpoint of urban society, focusing on the occurrence of the Ya-Aeng at Changgyeongwon (昌慶苑) in the modern city of Kyungsung. When the Ya-Aeng started in the 1920s, the social aspects of Kyungsung were in a transitional period from the traditional to the modern. The social modernization of Kyungsung has had a dramatic impact on the Ya-Aeng as a part of the city culture. Using the concept of 'phantasmagoria', which was widespread in Kyungsung society and the Ya-Aeng, this study has established three implications of the Ya-Aeng. First, Kyungsung's phantasmagoria appeared in the form of crowds, spectacles, and experiences. This study suggests that such interpretation also applies to the Ya-Aeng. This means that the capitalism-controlled modern society on one hand and the Ya-Aeng on the other had the same mechanism. Therefore, the Ya-Aeng, as modern city culture, becomes a miniature version of Kyungsung and a modern commodity world in itself. Second, the fact that phantasmagoria is a major element of the landscape of the Ya-Aeng means that there is a special way of seeing. For modern subjects, the phantasmagoria of the Ya-Aeng has acted as a learning mechanism for a modern way of seeing. Third and finally, the phantasmagoria of the Ya-Aeng was an illusion to encourage the continued consumption of this culture and at the same time, forget about the capitalism-controlled urban culture. At this time, capitalism was dominated by the influence of Japanese imperialism. The significance of this study lies in that it expands the idea of the Ya-Aeng from the events inside Changgyeongwon into the urban culture, which is a projection of modern urban society. In addition, where the Ya-Aeng in the past had been regarded as a decadent and poor-quality spring celebration in comparison to the traditional spring celebration, this study proposes a new point of view for the Ya-Aeng in an urban social context.

Haptic Perception presented in Picturesque Gardens - With a Focus on Picturesque Garden in Eighteenth-Century England - (픽처레스크 정원에 나타난 촉지적 지각 - 18세기 영국 픽처레스크 정원을 중심으로 -)

  • Kim, Jin-Seob;Kim, Jin-Seon
    • Journal of the Korean Institute of Landscape Architecture
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    • v.44 no.2
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    • pp.37-51
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    • 2016
  • Modern optical mechanisms slanted toward Ocular-centrism have neglected diverse functions of vision, judged objects in abstract and binary perspectives, and organized spaces accordingly, there by neglecting the function of eyes groping objects. Recently, various experiences have been induced through communication with other senses by the complex perception beyond the binary perception system of vision. Haptic perception is dynamic vision that induces accompanying bodily experiences through interaction among the various senses; it recognizes the characteristics of material properties and various sensitive stimulations of human beings. This study elaborates on the major features of haptic perception by examining the theoretical background of this concept, which stimulates the active experience of the subject and determines how characteristics of haptic perception are displayed in picturesque gardens. In order to identify the major features of haptic perception, this study examines how Adolf Hildebrand's theory of vision is developed, expanded, and reinterpreted by Alois Riegl, Wilhelm Worringer, Walter Benjamin, Maurice Merleau Ponty, and Gilles Deleuze in the histories of philosophy and aesthetics. Based thereon, the core differences in haptic perception models and visual perception models are analyzed, and the features of haptic perception are identified. Then, classical gardens are set for visual perception and picturesque gardens are set for haptic perception so that the features from haptic perception identified previously are projected onto the picturesque gardens. The research results drawn from this study regarding features of haptic perception presented in picturesque gardens are as follows. The core differences of haptic perception in contrast to visual perception can be summarized as ambiguity and obscureness of boundaries, generation of dynamic perspectives, induction of motility by indefinite circulation, and strangeness and sublime beauty by the impossibility of perception. In picturesque gardens, the ambiguity and obscureness of boundaries are presented in the irregularity and asymmetric elements of planes and the rejection of a single view, and the generation of dynamic perspectives results from the adoption of narrative structure and overlapping of spaces through the creation of complete views, medium range views, and distant views, which the existing gardens lack. Thus, the scene composition technique is reproduced. The induction of motility by indefinite circulation is created by branching circulation, and strangeness and sublime beauty are presented through the use of various elements and the adoption of 'roughness', 'irregularity', and 'ruins' in the gardens.