• Title, Summary, Keyword: Varieties

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SMOOTH HOROSPHERICAL VARIETIES OF PICARD NUMBER ONE AS LINEAR SECTIONS OF RATIONAL HOMOGENEOUS VARIETIES

  • Hong, Jaehyun
    • Journal of the Korean Mathematical Society
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    • v.53 no.2
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    • pp.433-446
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    • 2016
  • We construct projective embeddings of horospherical varieties of Picard number one by means of Fano varieties of cones over rational homogeneous varieties. Then we use them to give embeddings of smooth horospherical varieties of Picard number one as linear sections of rational homogeneous varieties.

Identification of Major Blast Resistance Genes in Korean Rice Varieties(Oryza sativa L.) Using Molecular Markers

  • Cho, Young-Chan;Kwon, Soon-Wook;Choi, Im-Soo;Lee, Sang-Kyu;Jeon, Jong-Seong;Oh, Myung-Kyu;Roh, Jae-Hwan;Hwang, Hung-Goo;Yang, Sae-June;Kim, Yeon-Gyu
    • Journal of Crop Science and Biotechnology
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    • v.10 no.4
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    • pp.265-276
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    • 2007
  • The 13 major blast resistance(R) genes against Magnaporthe grisea were screened in a number of Korean rice varieties using molecular markers. Of the 98 rice varieties tested, 28 were found to contain the Pia gene originating from Japanese japonica rice genotypes. The Pib gene from BL1 and BL7 was incorporated into 39 Korean japonica varieties, whereas this same gene from the IRRI-bred indica varieties was detected in all Tongil-type varieties. We also found that 17 of the japonica varieties contained the Pii gene. The Pii gene in Korean rice varieties originates from the Korean japonica variety Nongbaeg, and Japanese japonica varieties Hitomebore, Inabawase, and Todorokiwase. The Pi5 gene, which clusters with Pii on chromosome 9, was identified only in Taebaeg. Thirty-four varieties were found to contain alleles of the resistance gene Pita or Pita-2. The Pita gene in japonica varieties was found to be inherited from the Japanese japonica genotype Shimokita, and the Pita-2 gene was from Fuji280 and Sadominori. Seventeen japonica and one Tongil-type varieties contained the Piz gene, which in the japonica varieties originates from Fukuhikari and 54BC-68. The Piz-t gene contained in three Tongil-type varieties was derived from IRRI-bred indica rice varieties. The Pi9(t) gene locus that is present in Korean japonica and Tongil-type varieties was not inherited from the original Pi9 gene from wild rice Oryza minuta. The Pik-multiple allele genes Pik, Pik-m, and Pik-p were identified in 24 of the varieties tested. In addition, the Pit gene inherited from the indica rice K59 strain was not found in any of the Korean japonica or Tongil-type varieties tested.

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PULL-BACK MORPHISMS, CONVOLUTION PRODUCTS AND STEINBERG VARIETIES

  • Kwon, Namhee
    • Journal of the Chungcheong Mathematical Society
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    • v.24 no.3
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    • pp.427-436
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    • 2011
  • In this paper, we first show that the pull-back morphism between two K-groups of the Steinberg varieties, obtained respectively from partial flag varieties and quiver varieties of type A, is a ring homomorphism with respect to the convolution product. Then, we prove that this ring homomorphism yields a property of compatibility between two certain convolution actions.

Effect of Potassium Application on Yield-Related Characters and Contents of Starch and Hydrocyanic Acid of Cassava

  • Park Chang-Ho;Kim Kwang-Ho;Aswidinnoor Hajrial;Rumawas Fred
    • KOREAN JOURNAL OF CROP SCIENCE
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    • v.50 no.5
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    • pp.309-318
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    • 2005
  • Higher level of KCl application stimulated both leaf area index and leaf area duration in all cassava varieties, while the leaf and tuber number of the bitter varieties (high cyanide-level varieties) decreased in proportion to the level of KCl application. The root/shoot (R/S) ratio and harvest index (HI) were negatively related with the level of KCl application in all cassava varieties. The bitter varieties obtained the lowest R/S ratio at the level of 100 - 150 kg KCl $ha^{-1}$, while the sweet varieties (low cyanide-level varieties) acquired the highest values at the level of 50 - 150 kg KCl $ha^{-1}$. Also, the sweet varieties showed the lowest HI at the level of 250 kg KCl $ha^{-1}$, but the bitter varieties at the level of 150 kg KCl $ha^{-1}$. At 6 - 8 months after planting, the sweet varieties tended to obtain higher starch content of roots (tubers) at the level of 50 - 150 kg KCl $ha^{-1}$, while the bitter varieties at the level of 150 - 250 kg KCl $ha^{-1}$. Relatively lower level of 50 - 150 kg KCl $ha^{-1}$ was more appropriate for decreasing hydrocyanic acid (HCN) content of roots (tubers) in the sweet varieties at the harvest time, and the level of 250 kg KCl $ha^{-1}$ was adequate to decrease not only HCN content of leaves but also that of roots (tubers) in the bitter varieties during the growing period. To obtain higher yield and starch content of tubers, and lower HCN content of roots (tubers), it was recommended that the sweet varieties are applied with the level of 50 - 100 kg KCl $ha^{-1}$ and the bitter varieties with the level of 150 - 200 kg KCl $ha^{-1}$, respectively, in Latosol soils of Bogor areas, West Java.

Screening of Some Indigenous and Exotic Mulberry Varieties against Major Foliar Fungal and Bacterial Diseases

  • Maji M.D.;Sau H.;Das B.K.;Urs S. Raje
    • International Journal of Industrial Entomology
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    • v.12 no.1
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    • pp.35-39
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    • 2006
  • Fifty-six indigenous and twenty nine exotic mulberry varieties were screened against powdery mildew, Myrothecium leaf spot, Pseudocercospora leaf spot, sooty mold and bacterial leaf spot for a period of three years under field condition. The percent disease index (PDI) was recorded during peak season of the foliar diseases. Out of eighty-five varieties studied, ten varieties were highly resistant and eight were resistant to powdery mildew; six varieties were immune and seventy-eight varieties were highly resistant to Myrothecium leaf spot; sixty varieties were highly resistant and 21 were resistant to Pseudocercospora leaf spot; forty four varieties were highly resistant to sooty mold and two varieties were immune and fifty-eight were highly resistant to bacterial leaf spot. Lowest cumulatative disease index was observed in M. multicaulis (7.28) followed by Thailand lobed (7.85) and Italian mulberry (8.06).

A Vegetation Characteristics of Native and Introduced Kentucky bluegrass Cultivars Seeded on Cut-Slop (자생 및 도입 켄터키 블루그래스 품종의 훼손비탈면 녹화 특성)

  • Jeong, Dae-Young;Shim, Sang-Ryul;Ahn, Byung-Joon
    • Journal of the Korean Society of Environmental Restoration Technology
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    • v.12 no.1
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    • pp.82-91
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    • 2009
  • Research was initiated to investigate vegetation characteristics of native ('Pureundle' and 'Sewon') and introduced ('Brilliant' and 'Midnight') Kentucky bluegrass (KB, Poa pratensis L.) varieties by soil-seed applying system on a cut-slope in May 17, 2008. There were no statistic differences observed in soil hardness and soil moisture content while significant differences were observed in surface coverage rate, height and disease occurrence in native and introduced KB varieties. The introduced 'Brilliant' KB was highest in the surface coverage rate from the early period of seeding to August 11, 2008. The surface coverage rate of introduced varieties were high when compared to native varieties in their early growth stage. But native varieties reached to equal surface coverage rate with the introduced varieties when three months after seeding. The height of 'Pureundle' and 'Brilliant' KBs were high compared with Midnight and Sewon KBs. 'Pureundle' and 'Brilliant' KBs were damaged by disease whereas there were no disease occurrence in 'Midnight' and 'Sewon' KBs. Probably, the disease occurrence was close related with the height of KBs not with native and introduced KB varieties. These results indicate that the growth of KB on a cut-slope are statistically affected by varieties in early growth stage of this experiment but reach equal rate between native and introduced KB varieties in three months after seeding. This growth characteristics implies the huge potential of native KB varieties seeding for cut-slope vegetation. Considering that native KB varieties are adapted to a environment and have no risk of causing disturbance to the ecosystem compared to the introduced KB varieties, the use of them as native varieties for a cut-slope vegetation can be increased.

CLASSIFICATION OF SMOOTH SCHUBERT VARIETIES IN THE SYMPLECTIC GRASSMANNIANS

  • HONG, JAEHYUN
    • Journal of the Korean Mathematical Society
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    • v.52 no.5
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    • pp.1109-1122
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    • 2015
  • A Schubert variety in a rational homogeneous variety G/P is defined by the closure of an orbit of a Borel subgroup B of G. In general, Schubert varieties are singular, and it is an old problem to determine which Schubert varieties are smooth. In this paper, we classify all smooth Schubert varieties in the symplectic Grassmannians.

Varietal Variation in Antioxidative Activity of Rice Grain by DPPH and TBA Methods

  • Chung, Ill-Min;Kim, Kwang-Ho;Ahn, Joung-Kuk;Lee, Jin-Ohk
    • KOREAN JOURNAL OF CROP SCIENCE
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    • v.45 no.4
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    • pp.261-266
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    • 2000
  • This study was to investigate antioxidative activity of rice grain using 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl(DPPH) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) method and germination ability for screening rice varieties with high antioxidative activities on korean native and foreign rice varieties harvested in 1998 and 1999. The average antioxidative activity of foreign rice varieties (DPPH 63.5% and TBA 55.2%) was significantly higher than that of native rice varieties (DPPH 47.2% and TBA 45.6%) on varieties harvested in 1999. The promptness index (PI) of native rice varieties was higher in stored rices for three months (mean PI=160.7) than that of stored rices for a year (mean PI=141.6). On the other hand, the PI of foreign rice varieties was higher in stored rices stored for a year (mean PI=176.7) than that of stored rices for three months (mean PI=157.5). Varieties with high redness of hulled rice (a-value) showed significant lipid peroxidation inhibitory activity to DPPH in a stored rices for a year (r=${0.5744}^**$) and stored rices for three months (r=${0.5630}^**$) . These results indicate that the pigments of hulled rice varieties may play important antioxidative roles and colored rice varieties with higher antioxidative potentials can be developed and also may provide information with rice breeder to breed rice variety with a high antioxidative activity for a rapid screening of a small amounts of a large number of samples using color value.

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RESTRICTED AVERAGING OPERATORS IN THE FINITE FIELD SETTING

  • Koh, Doowon;Yeom, Seongjun
    • Journal of the Chungcheong Mathematical Society
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    • v.30 no.2
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    • pp.259-272
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    • 2017
  • In this paper we study the mapping properties of the finite field restricted averaging operators to various algebraic varieties. We derive necessary conditions for the boundedness of the generalized restricted averaging operator related to arbitrary algebraic varieties. It is shown that the necessary conditions are in fact sufficient in the specific case when the Fourier transform on varieties has enough decay estimates. Our work extends the known optimal result on regular varieties such as paraboloids and spheres to certain lower dimensional varieties.

Effect of Location, Season, and Variety on Yield and Quality of Forage Oat

  • Kim, J.D.;Kim, S.G.;Abue, S.J.;Kwon, C.H.;Shin, C.N.;Ko, K.H.;Park, B.G.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.19 no.7
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    • pp.970-977
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    • 2006
  • Forage oat (Avena sativa L.) is grown extensively in a double-cropping system on dairy farms. Four oat varieties ('Swan', 'Targa', 'Foothill', and 'Nugene') were evaluated for forage production and forage quality during two growing seasons (spring and autumn) at two locations (central and southern region) in South Korea. The heading stage of four oat varieties was observed during spring, but the autumn season did not produce heading until harvest time except for the 'Swan' variety (early-maturing variety). The heading stage of 'Swan' in both locations was earlier compared to other varieties. The four varieties were resistant to both foliar disease and insects. Lodging resistance was higher during autumn except in 2002 at the central region, and late-maturing varieties ('Foothill' and 'Nugene') have lower lodging resistance. Dry matter (DM) content was significantly different between varieties (p<0.001). Comparing different varieties, 'Swan', an early-maturing variety, was highest in DM content. In DM, total digestible nutrients (TDN) and crude protein (CP) yield, the yield of oat varieties in the southern region was higher than in the central region, and forage yield of the oat varieties in the spring season was higher than during the autumn season. The DM and TDN yield showed significant differences between oat varieties. The CP content of oats grown in the central region (Cheonan) was lower than oats grown in the southern region (Daegu), and the spring season produced oats with lower CP compared to the autumn season. Among the four oat varieties, the CP content of late-maturing varieties was higher than the Swan variety (early-maturing variety). The acid detergent fiber (ADF) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) contents were higher for the varieties grown in Cheonan and during the spring season. The ADF and NDF contents of late-maturing varieties were lower than the early-maturing variety. TDN and relative feed value (RFV) were higher for the varieties grown in Daegu and during the autumn season. Late-maturing variety had higher TDN and RFV than early-maturing variety. Our study showed differences in forage production and forage quality of oats grown in different locations, seasons and varieties. Forage quality as well as forage production was better in the southern region than in the central region. Forage quality was better during autumn, but forage production was better during spring. Late-maturing variety had better forage quality than the early-maturing variety. Therefore, late-maturing varieties are more suitable for use in the southern region.