• Title, Summary, Keyword: True Metabolisable Energy

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True Metabolisable Energy and True Amino Acid Availability in Chinese Varieties of Dehulled and Hulled Soybean Meals Determined with Adult Roosters

  • Wang, Jitan;Li, Defa;Gong, Limin;Xing, Jianjun;Shen, Huile;Ma, Guolong Song Fabo
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.16 no.10
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    • pp.1487-1494
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    • 2003
  • Studies were conducted with intact White Leghorn roosters to determine the true metabolisable energy (TME) and the true amino acid availability (TAAA) in five dehulled and hulled soybean meals produced in China. 60 roosters, kept in individual cages, were fasted for 48 h and then tube-fed 50 g of one of experimental feedstuffs and their excreta was then collected for the subsequent 48 h period. Two separate collection periods were used with each meal being fed to 12 roosters. The birds were given a 15-day recovery period between collection periods. An additional 12 roosters were either fasted or fed a protein-free diet in order to estimate the extent of endogenous losses of energy and amino acids in excreta. The average values per bird for nitrogen loss, endogenous energy losses (EEL) and endogenous energy losses corrected to zero-nitrogen balance ($EEL_n$) were found to be 0.74 g, 47.0 kJ and 21.5 kJ, respectively. It was found that the TME and TAAA values of dehulled soybean meal were higher than those of hulled soybean meal. The TME and nitrogen-corrected TME metabolisable energy values of dehulled soybean meal were 10.58 and 10.74 MJ/kg, respectively, while the corresponding values for hulled soybean meal were 10.03 and 10.27 MJ/kg, respectively. The average indispensable and dispensable amino acid availability of dehulled soybean meal was 92.1 and 93.5%, compared with 89.3 and 91.4% for hulled soybean meal. Dehulled soybean meal would therefore appear to be superior to hulled soybean meal as a source of protein and energy for use in poultry rations.

Effect of Chemical Composition and Dietary Enzyme Supplementation on Metabolisable Energy of Wheat Screenings

  • Mazhari, M.;Golian, A.;Kermanshahi, H.
    • Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences
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    • v.24 no.3
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    • pp.386-393
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    • 2011
  • Three trials were conducted to determine the available energy of different wheat screening varieties collected from different locations of Khorasan in Iran. In experiment 1, chemical composition and the nitrogen corrected true metabolisable energy (TMEn) were evaluated. A precision-fed rooster assay was used, in which, each wheat screening sample was tube fed to adult roosters, and the excreta were collected for 48-h. In Exp. 2 and 3, five and two wheat screening verities-based diets with or without xylanase and phytase were fed to 16-day old battery reared chicks respectively, and total feed consumption and excreta were measured during next three days. The variable nature of wheat screening varieties led to significant differences in mean TMEn values (p<0.01). The TMEn values of samples determined with adult roosters varied by ${\pm}5.03%$ of the mean value ($3,097.65{\pm}49.32\;kcal/kg$) and ranged from 2,734.90 to 3,245.12 kcal/kg. There was a significant correlation (p<0.05) between crude fiber (CF), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and acid detergent fiber (ADF) with TMEn, and the greatest correlation coefficient was observed between NDF and TMEn (r = -0.947; p<0.001). The optimal equation in terms of $R^2$ from using a single chemical analysis was obtained with NDF: TMEn = 4,152.09-27.80 NDF ($R^2$ = 0.90, p<0.0001), and the TME prediction equation was improved by the addition of the crude protein (CP) and ASH content to sequential analysis: TMEn = 3,656.97-28.65 NDF+32.54 CP+38.70 ASH ($R^2$ = 0.98, p<0.0001). The average AMEn values of 5 and 2 wheat screening varieties determined with young broiler chickens were $2,968.41{\pm}25.70\;kcal/kg$ and $2,976.38{\pm}8.34\;kcal/kg$ in Exp. 2 and Exp. 3, respectively. Addition of xylanase and phytase to wheat screenings resulted in significant (p<0.01) improvement in AMEn by 4.21 and 2.92%, respectively.