• Title/Summary/Keyword: Traditional abstracts

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An Analysis of Move Patterns in Abstracts of Social Sciences Research Articles

  • Kim, Eungi
    • Journal of Korean Library and Information Science Society
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    • v.45 no.2
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    • pp.283-309
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    • 2014
  • A rhetorical segment in traditional abstract displaying a sign of particular function is frequently referred to as a move. One of the most common moves is the Background, Aim, Method, Results, and Conclusion (BAMRC). The objective of this paper is to investigate the move patterns of research article abstracts in the field of social sciences based on BAMRC moves. Using the Scopus bibliographic database, a total of 467 abstracts from 298 research journals in the field of social sciences were analyzed. The result showed a wide range of move patterns. The implication of the result of this study suggests the existing traditional abstracts in social sciences might not be sufficiently "informative" due to missing moves and due to various move orders. To this end, automatically mapping moves in traditional abstracts to sub-headings in structured abstracts can be a more challenging task, requiring additional procedures to resolve these types of compatibility issues. Future studies can compare this study's result to other fields or disciplines within social sciences in order to find a more precise nature of abstracts in the field of social sciences.

Abstracts in Medical Science Journals: An Analysis of Subheadings in Structured Abstracts (의학 저널에서 사용되는 구조적 초록의 소표제들에 관한 분석)

  • Kim, Eungi
    • Journal of Korean Library and Information Science Society
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    • v.47 no.1
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    • pp.199-216
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    • 2016
  • This study aimed to investigate the current uses of subheadings that appear in medical science journal abstracts and to discuss its potential implications for medical science from the perspectives of library and information science. To conduct this study, the following nine sub-fields in medical science were selected: cancer, ethics, genetics, infectious disease, neurology, pediatrics, immunology, psychiatry, and cardiology. Random sample data were drawn based on the years 2010 to 2015 from the PubMed database. This study investigated the extent of the uses of subheadings, variants of subheadings, and common formation of subheadings with the help of a frequency analysis. The specific findings of this study are summarized as the following: 1) more traditional abstracts are used across almost all sub-fields of medical science; 2) on average, 4.1 subheadings were used in the sample dataset; and 3) the most frequently used set of subheadings is OBJECTIVES, METHODS, RESULTS, and CONCLUSIONS. This subheading set appears to be the de facto standard across all medical science journals. The analysis of subheadings in structured abstracts and the issues raised in this study can be beneficial for journal editors and other academics in medical science as well as library and information science.