• Title, Summary, Keyword: Survivors

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Prevalence, Awareness, Control, and Treatment of Hypertension and Diabetes in Korean Cancer Survivors: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Fourth and Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys

  • Choi, Kyung-Hyun;Park, Sang Min;Lee, Kiheon;Kim, Kyae Hyung;Park, Joo-Sung;Han, Seong Ho
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.12
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    • pp.7685-7692
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    • 2013
  • Background: Management of hypertension and diabetes in cancer survivors is an important issue; however, not much is known about the level of management of such chronic disease in Korea. This study therefore assessed the prevalence, awareness, control, and treatment of hypertension and diabetes in Korean cancer survivors compared to non-cancer survivors. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional design was employed, wherein data were obtained from standardized questionnaires completed by 943 cancer survivors and 41,233 non-cancer survivors who participated in the Fourth and Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2007-2011). We calculated adjusted proportions for prevalence and management of hypertension and diabetes in non-cancer survivors and cancer survivors. We also assessed the associated factors with prevalence and management of cancer survivors. Results: Cancer survivors are more likely than the general population to have higher prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension. However, diabetic management was not significantly higher in cancer survivors than in non-cancer survivors, despite their having a higher prevalence. Several factors, such as, age, drinking, years since cancer diagnosis, self-perceived health status, and specific cancer types were found to affect to management of hypertension and diabetes. Conclusions: These data suggest that cancer survivors appear to be better than non-cancer survivors at management of hypertension, but not diabetes. There is a need for healthcare providers to recognize the importance of long-term chronic disease management for cancer survivors and for the care model to be shared between primary care physicians and oncologists.

Prevalence of and Factors Associated with Osteoporosis among Korean Cancer Survivors: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Fourth and Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys

  • Choi, Kyung-Hyun;Park, Sang Min;Park, Joo-Sung;Park, Jae-Hyun;Kim, Kyae Hyung;Kim, Myung-Ju
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.8
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    • pp.4743-4750
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    • 2013
  • Background: Identifying and managing osteoporosis among cancer survivors is an important issue, yet little is known about the bone health of cancer survivors in Korea. This study was designed to measure the prevalence of osteoporosis and to assess related factors among Korean cancer survivors. Materials and Methods: This study was designed as a cross-sectional analysis. Data were obtained from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry measurement of the lumbar vertebrae and femoral neck, and from standardized questionnaires among 556 cancer survivors and 17,623 non-cancer controls who participated in the Fourth and Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2008-2011). We calculated adjusted proportions of osteoporosis in non-cancer controls vs. cancer survivors, and we performed multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: The prevalence of osteoporosis among cancer survivors was significant higher than that of the non-cancer controls after adjusting for related factors. Furthermore, osteoporosis among cancer survivors was higher in elderly subjects (60-69 years : adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 3.04, 95% CI : 1.16-8.00, ${\geq}70$ years : aOR 6.60, 95% CI 2.20-19.79), in female cancer survivors (aOR: 7.03, 95% CI: 1.88-26.28), and in a group with lower monthly income (aOR: 3.38, 95% CI: 1.31-8.71). In male cancer survivors, underweight and lower calcium intake were risk factors. Conclusions: These data suggest that the osteoporosis among cancer survivors varies according to non-oncologic and oncologic factors. Effective screening should be applied, and a sufficient and comprehensive management should be matched to individual cancer survivors early after cancer treatment.

In Whom Do Cancer Survivors Trust Online and Offline?

  • Shahrokni, Armin;Mahmoudzadeh, Sanam;Lu, Bryan Tran
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.15 no.15
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    • pp.6171-6176
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    • 2014
  • Background: In order to design effective educational intervention for cancer survivors, it is necessary to identify most-trusted sources for health-related information and the amount of attention paid to each source. Objective: The objective of our study was to explore the sources of health information used by cancer survivors according to their access to the internet and levels of trust in and attention to those information sources. Materials and Methods: We analyzed sources of health information among cancer survivors using selected questions adapted from the 2012 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). Results: Of 357 participants, 239 (67%) had internet access (online survivors) while 118 (33%) did not (offline survivors). Online survivors were younger (p<0.001), more educated (p<0.001), more non-Hispanic whites (p<0.001), had higher income (p<0.001), had more populated households (p<0.001) and better quality of life (p<0.001) compared to offline survivors. Prevalence of some disabilities was higher among offline survivors including serious difficulties with walking or climbing stairs (p<0.001), being blind or having severe visual impairment (p=0.001), problems with making decisions (p<0.001), doing errands alone (p=0.001) and dressing or bathing (p=0.001). After adjusting for socio-demographic status, cancer survivors who were non-Hispanic whites (OR= 3.49, p<0.01), younger (OR=4.10, p<0.01), more educated (OR= 2.29, p=0.02), with greater income (OR=4.43, p<0.01), and with very good to excellent quality of life (OR=2.60, p=0.01) had higher probability of having access to the internet, while those living in Midwest were less likely to have access (OR= 0.177, p<0.01). Doctors (95.5%) were the most and radio (27.8%) was the least trusted health related information source among all cancer survivors. Online survivors trusted internet much more compared to those without access (p<0.001) while offline cancer survivors trusted health-related information from religious groups and radio more than those with internet access (p<0.001 and p=0.008). Cancer survivors paid the most attention to health information on newsletters (63.8%) and internet (60.2%) and the least to radio (19.6%). More online survivors paid attention to internet than those without access (68.5% vs 39.1%, p<0.001) while more offline survivors paid attention to radio compared to those with access (26.8% vs 16.5%, p=0.03). Conclusions: Our findings emphasize the importance of improving the access and empowering the different sources of information. Considering that the internet and web technologies are continuing to develop, more attention should be paid to improve access to the internet, provide guidance and maintain the quality of accredited health information websites. Those without internet access should continue to receive health-related information via their most trusted sources.

Health-Related Quality of Life in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors: A Prospective Cohort Study

  • Kang, Danbee;Cho, Juhee;Kim, Im Ryung;Kim, Mi Kyung;Kim, Won Seog;Kim, Seok Jin
    • Cancer Research and Treatment
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    • v.50 no.4
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    • pp.1051-1063
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    • 2018
  • Purpose We evaluated health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in long-term survivors of indolent and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Materials and Methods The HRQOL was assessed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality-of-Life Questionnaire Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) at diagnosis in NHL patients between 2008 and 2011, and follow-up evaluation was conducted from June 2014 to February 2015 using EORTC QLQ-C30 and the quality of life in cancer survivors (QOL-CS) questionnaire. We used linear mixed models to compare changes in HRQOL between indolent and aggressive NHL over time. Results The HRQOL of long-term survivors with aggressive NHL improved to the similar level of indolent NHL during the follow-up survey. However, survivors of NHL were found to fear the probability of relapse and second malignancy, and the degree of fear was not different between survivors with aggressive stage I/II or III/IV NHL (p > 0.05). Furthermore, a half of survivors reported impaired sense of psychosocial well-being regardless of aggressiveness and stage during follow-up survey. More than 65% of survivors thought they did not receive sufficient support from others, and patients who had financial difficulties at diagnosis were more frequently associated with suffering from insufficient support. Impaired physical and cognitive functioning at diagnosis was significantly associated with lack of life purpose in long-term survivors. Conclusion The HRQOL of aggressive NHL survivors improved to a similar level to that of indolent NHL. However, the majority of survivors still had fear of relapse, and psychosocial well-being remained unmet needs.

Psychosocial Adjustment between Younger and Older Breast Cancer Survivors (젊은 유방암 생존자와 나이든 유방암 생존자의 심리사회적 적응)

  • Kim, Hye Young;Ko, Eun
    • Asian Oncology Nursing
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    • v.12 no.4
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    • pp.280-288
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    • 2012
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the differences in psychosocial adjustment between younger (age${\leq}50$) and older (age>50) breast cancer survivors, and to explore the role of sociodemographic and disease-related variables in predicting psychosocial adjustment between younger and older breast cancer survivors. Methods: A total of 262 women participated in this study. A self-reported questionnaire, the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale-Self Report Korean version (PAIS-SR Korean version), was used. Data were analyzed with SAS/WIN 9.1 for descriptive statistics using the t-test, ANOVA, and stepwise multiple regression. Results: The psychosocial adjustment score of younger breast cancer survivors was significantly higher than that of older breast cancer survivors. Significant predictors influencing psychosocial adjustment in younger breast cancer survivors were marital state, menopausal cause, immune therapy, and self-help group, and these predictors account for 48% of the variance in psychosocial adjustment. Significant predictors influencing psychosocial adjustment in older breast cancer survivors were stage of cancer, monthly income, marital state, and menopausal cause. These predictors accounted for 35% of the variance in psychosocial adjustment. Conclusion: The findings indicate the importance of counseling and educational programs to improve the psychosocial adjustment according to breast cancer survivors' age.

Assessing Activity Limitation Among Cancer Survivors in Korea Using Data from a Nationwide Survey

  • Oh, Myueng Guen;Han, Mi Ah;Byeon, Yu Mi;Bae, Kyung Min;Choi, Seong-Hyung
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.16 no.7
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    • pp.2739-2743
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    • 2015
  • Background: More than 1 million cancer survivors reside in Korea. We here investigated activity limitations of cancer survivors compared to controls without a history of cancer. Materials and Methods: Using the 4th and 5th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2012) data, we identified 1,155 adult cancer survivors. Activity limitations were defined as limitation in activities of daily living, experience of lying in a sickbed, and number of days lying in a sickbed during the last month. Descriptive analysis and multiple logistic regression compared these measures for survivors and controls by sex and age groups. Results: Approximately 29.4% of cancer survivors reported limitation in activities of daily living, 14.6% experienced lying in a sickbed, and 4.3% experienced more than 15 days lying in a sickbed during the last month. After controlling for demographic and health-related factors, cancer survivors were more likely to report activity limitation than controls. The associations were similar across sex and age groups. Conclusions: Cancer survivors have increased activity limitation compared to controls and these limitations persist across sex and age. Targeted interventions and improved management are essential for improving cancer survivor daily life.

Experience of 'overcoming the pain of family loss of suicide' through suicide bereavement support group: SPACE experiential model of family survivors (자조모임을 통한 자살유가족의 '고통 이겨냄' 과정: SPACE 모델)

  • Seo, Chonghee;Park, Jiyoung;Baek, Minjeong;Kim, Misook
    • 한국가족관계학회지
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    • v.22 no.3
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    • pp.73-101
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    • 2017
  • Objectives: This study is to understand the experiences of overcoming pain of loss of family survivors in Suicide Bereavement Support Group(SBSG). Method: Experiential data was collected by in-depth interview(FGI, individual) to 10 family survivors(over 19) who having an experience participating in SBSG over 5months and analyzed using qualitative methodology. Results: We drew the result that 'SPACE model' which structuralize by 5 stages of suicide survivors' experience of SBSG of time path. SPACE model configured as follow: Stage1, Space in vacuum, the time to feel a sense of overwhelming feeling like pain, fear, alienation after loss of suicide, Stage2, Probing, when to find informations and resources to help survivors themselves, Stage3, Acclimation, having experiences empathy and healing as in SBSG, Stage4, Composure, accepting SBSG meaning as a part of their lives, loss of my family by suicide, and the beginning of bereavement, Stage5, Endurance, overcoming suffering through SBSG and try to help other survivors. Conclusions: SBSG is the opportunity for family survivors to overcome the pains from loss of suicide, shock, anger, grief, etc., and to empower them to help other suicide survivors.

Relationships Between Cause of Cancer and Breast Cancer-Related Factors in Breast Cancer Survivors

  • Wang, Hsiu-Ho;Chung, Ue-Lin
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.13 no.8
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    • pp.3889-3892
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    • 2012
  • Aims: The purposes of this study were to (1) to identify the causes of cancer in breast cancer survivors in Taiwan; and (2) to investigate the influence of demographic characteristics and breast cancer-related factors on the cause of cancer. Materials and method: This study details the related investigative results on survivors with breast cancer using a descriptive and correlational design. A convenience sampling approach was employed. A structured questionnaire was used to assess the participants. Results: A total of 230 breast cancer survivors completed the questionnaire. Low-scoring cause of cancer participants were older adults (OR = 2.49, p<0.05) who were already of menopausal status (OR = 2.28, p < 0.05). Around 72% of particpants agreed high responsibility. Our breast cancer survivors felt stress had caused their breast cancer. Conclusion: These findings are helpful in understanding the relationship between cause of cancer and related factors in breast cancer survivors.

The Effects of Community-Based Mind Subtraction Meditation Program on Quality of Life, Life Satisfaction, and Expectancy of Satisfactory Life in Cancer Survivors (마음수련 명상 프로그램이 지역사회 암 생존자의 삶의 질, 삶의 만족, 삶의 기대에 미치는 효과)

  • Kim, Myoungsuk;Choi, Eun-Hi;Yun, MiRa
    • Journal of East-West Nursing Research
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    • v.22 no.2
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    • pp.87-95
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    • 2016
  • Purpose: The purposes of this study were to develop a community-based Mind Subtraction meditation program for cancer survivors and examine the effectiveness of the developed program on quality of life, life satisfaction, and expectancy of satisfactory life in cancer survivors. Methods: This study used a one group, pretest-posttest design. A 5-week community-based meditation program for cancer survivors was offered twice a week with each session up to 2 hours. 10 cancer survivors who had completed cancer treatments participated in this study. Data were collected using self-reported questionnaires and personal journals about the meditation experience from September 10 to December 11, 2015 at a health center branch in Seoul, South Korea. Results: There were statistically significant differences in physical domain of quality of life (QOL) expectancy of satisfactory life. Conclusion: This study shows that the community-based Mind Subtraction meditation program for cancer survivors can be considered as an effective nursing intervention to improve quality of life and expectancy of satisfactory life among cancer survivors in a community setting.

Review of Childhood Cancer Survivors' Health-related Need (소아암 생존자의 건강관련 요구에 대한 고찰)

  • Lim, Su-Jin
    • Journal of the Korea Convergence Society
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    • v.11 no.3
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    • pp.361-368
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    • 2020
  • The purpose of this study was to identify studies related to childhood cancer survivors' health-related needs and analyze scales for measurement of childhood cancer survivors' health-related needs. Studies related to childhood cancer survivors' health-related needs were retrieved from computerized databases using a manual search. The review included 17 studies. The main domains of childhood cancer survivors' health related needs were derived from the studies was psychosocial needs. 4 need assessment scales analyzed in this study were developed in foreign countries. scales were not suitable for the measurement of the needs of Korea childhood cancer survivors. Thus, should be developed comprehensive health related needs scale of childhood cancer survivors in future study.